scottb613

Beaver Backfire ?

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Hi Folks,

I'm sure it's me and I'm probably missing something obvious - my Beaver continually backfires - complete with smoke and flame out the exhaust - anyone know how to stop it ???

Thanks...

Regards,
Scott

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The Milviz Otter does something similar if you try & take off with full throttle. Runs ok if you back off the throttle & have mixture at 85% initially.

T45

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Hi Folks,

Thanks for the answers - LOL - I'm a typical guy - we dread reading manuals - we're supposed to have this sixth sense to figure out all things mechanical - - - I guess I'm lacking... I do read when my butt is getting into a real plane though...

:tongue:

Regards,
Scott  

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The problem with that is, when you show up and ask questions that are in the manual, we have to take the time to answer them.  That time could be better used (for us) coding and dev'ing our stuff... new and old.

 

Sorry for the directness but... there's a reason why it's an actual acronym... (RTFM)....

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Snarky answers from someone in the Company, you just paid good money for their airplane, just doesn't cut it.

I personally have read the manual from cover to cover and more than once in some areas.  I also used up good ink by printing it out so I could read it while flying.  My memory is not so good any more so can't remember a lot.  Some of the areas also say not simulated in this plane. I know you have to cut back the throttle sometimes, but is there ever a time you can use full throttle without out backfiring?  I haven't found where it says you can.  If you can't then why not just limit the amount of throttle travel?

I hope this question doesn't result in another "Snarky" answer.

Tom

 

PS:  The plane so far is a lot of fun and runs fine on my computer.

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13 minutes ago, THibben said:

If you can't then why not just limit the amount of throttle travel?

Because that is how it works in the real Otter. 

Visual/sound Effects are simulated as much as possible also, within FS limitations.

Tom

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On 11/27/2017 at 5:46 AM, scottb613 said:

Hi Folks,

Thanks for the answers - LOL - I'm a typical guy - we dread reading manuals - we're supposed to have this sixth sense to figure out all things mechanical - - - I guess I'm lacking... I do read when my butt is getting into a real plane though...

:tongue:

Regards,
Scott  

Scott,

That's a good, mature attitude in the face of a crappy response, especially from someone at the company you bought a product from. That's some impressive character you've got there. I don't think I would have responded the way you did-. Shows a lot of class. 

 Glad to hear the Beaver is done so well this behavior of smoke and backfire is modeled, but I for one will remember those 2 replies you got from Milviz when it's time to flex the credit card this month. 

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Totally fine mate.  We get that a lot.  But if clients actually spent the time reading the manual, instead of asking us to answer the questions we already answered.., they'd have a LOT more fun and we'd be able to make a lot more aircraft that you could not buy.  See how that works?

Can't win here... You're going to be angry no matter what I say or do.  

Your money... your choice.

 

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Hi Colin,

Since I started this mess - it's all good - please keep in mind this is the "unofficial" MilViz forum - I wasn't really looking for or expecting an official company response and I didn't open a support ticket - I was merely looking for a tip from a fellow customer who may have experienced the same issue and knew the solution - that's all... It was asked and answered in posts 2 and 3 - we're good...

Regards,
Scott

 

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You're very welcome.

And thank you for your purchase.

 

I hope you enjoy the product we made.

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1 hour ago, Milviz said:

Totally fine mate.  We get that a lot.  But if clients actually spent the time reading the manual, instead of asking us to answer the questions we already answered.., they'd have a LOT more fun and we'd be able to make a lot more aircraft that you could not buy.  See how that works?

Can't win here... You're going to be angry no matter what I say or do.  

Your money... your choice.

 

:laugh:

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'Morning:

This is a late response to a thread I've only just found. First, a thanks to Scottb613 for holding his ground like a gentleman, then to those who responded with positive solutions. They solved an issue I've been struggling with myself. 

Having worked both as a manual writer and a tech support person, with RTFM on the office wall -- although of course never spoken to clients -- I have to say that in this case the manual doesn't cut it, and the superior attitude expressed by some seems inappropriate. 

The only way to resolve the backfire problem is to completely fly by the book, up to and including carb temperatures. How many simmers -- part-timers all -- read with that attention to detail, fly like that, or should be expected to?There's nothing in the manual, at least that I've found, that refers to backfires in flight and how to resolve them. Not only that, but in the graphic on instruments, there's no label I can see for carb temperature, the key to the issue. 

So to me it seems that Scottb613's initial query was an entirely reasonable one, and the somewhat snarky responses both inappropriate and deserving of at least a mild apology.

Cheers, G

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4 hours ago, graaant said:

Not only that, but in the graphic on instruments, there's no label I can see for carb temperature, the key to the issue.

The instruments are not labeled because they aren't in the real aircraft either.

Keep the carb  temp in the green arc:

yV3T0.png

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How dare a real aircraft manufacturer NOT label an instrument!! :huh::biggrin:

Then again, given the range of temperatures on the gauge and the green area, it clearly cannot be for engine temperature. Perhaps the gauge shows you when it's the ideal day is to go flying? LOL! :tongue:

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it does say that it's the carb heat in the manual.  It doesn't say you will PAY for it if you go over the green line.  Perhaps it should but usually that's what RED LINES mean ... no?

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When I said "labels" in my post above, I meant 'tooltips', which top designers include (yeah, of course, v. few real world panels include labels). Sorry ... lazy wording on my part.

That slip led, maybe predictably, to a few snarky and superior responses ... maybe, although I've enjoyed their models, I'm beginning to wonder about Milviz on the people side. 

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I want to say I was having this problem too.  Thanks to all who answered.  I work as a Pharmacist so to me there is no dumb questions because many people ask many dumb ones.  People seek information that is often labeled clearly on the bottle, but they trust a human response to confirm what they are seeing.  There are also many who will not listen because what you are saying is not what they want to hear.  I see both sides of this discussion, but in the end everyone worked it out.  Again thanks to all

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On ‎1‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 7:03 PM, HighBypass said:

How dare a real aircraft manufacturer NOT label an instrument!! :huh::biggrin:

Then again, given the range of temperatures on the gauge and the green area, it clearly cannot be for engine temperature. Perhaps the gauge shows you when it's the ideal day is to go flying? LOL! :tongue:

Keep in mind that this temperature is for the air entering the carburetor's venturi. When in the yellow (or lower) there is a severe risk of carburetor icing. When above the gree arc, there is a risk of pre-detonation (backfiring). When at sufficient altitude (I don't remember the precise altitude), full throttle range is possible since it will still be in the safe (green) range.

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