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Bert Pieke

First impressions

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4 hours ago, Les Parson said:

Andi, 

One question- What is a typical climb FF (GAL) per side? Thanks. 

Les, you'll find the answer on the power Setting table of my C421 checklist (last page):
climb power is: 32.5 in MP, 1900 RPM, 24.5 GPH/side (I do set 1 GPH more in reality). That's About 75 % MCP @ best power mixture.
I usually do climb at 125 to 130 KIAS.

In the sim, climb power is too low compared to full power (About 65 % instead of 75 %). I have to find a way to adjust that.

You'll also find the MP Limits by altitude. The critical altitude is higher that's why I adjusted it. Where? Wait a second...
 

Edited by AndiKunzi

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Curse you Alabeo - now I have to go buy another aircraft!!!!!!

Was reading a Kindle book in which, among other things, the author recounts stories from his 18 year experience as a corporate pilot flying a Cessna 421 when Alabeo released their new Cessna 421 Golden Eagle.  Now I HAVE to get my own.  The book includes some of the short stories you might hear recounted over a beer, nothing formal. but fasinating, like holding up Air Force One with Nixon on board while he cleared out of the way. And a detailed section about all phases of flight in a C421, including some of the author's 'cockpit procedure rules' he followed in addition to the formal checklist - stuff I've never seen mentioned elsewhere.  Hugely interesting to this fledgling sim-pilot.  He has made available, for Kindle, a digitization of the un-copywritten 1974 Cessna 421B Owner's Manual!!!!

Two Books by Hal Stoen

The Cessna 421B Owner's Manual $5.00

A Flying Life

I ofc have no financial or other involvement in this, just seeking to pay back with some good info all the excellent things I've learned here.

 

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One thing I learned from reading the experiences of a real world C421 pilot was just how very finicky the engines are, like dealing with cold shock.  Is this finickiness modeled in the Alabeo release?  I've seen a review or announcement that mentions this about the engines, but they were unclear if they were referring to the Alabeo sim or the RW C421.

By the way, in the early days there was a qwerk in the very complex fuel system where it was quite possible to flood out the engine and stop it functioning or restarting.  Following the correct procedure for in flight engine restart just made it worse.  Several C421s crashed for unknown reasons due to this flaw.  The author was the first to manage to get his aircraft onto the ground safely in a cornfield.  This gave the company a chance to identify the problem and issue modified procedures.

Not sure if I hope the Alabeo system models that flaw or not. 🙂

 

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Shock cooling is a concern, but not to the extent fear was spread in former times. As long as you don‘t just pull the throttles back from 65 % to 30 % MCP at FL250 and -30 dC and do touch the throttle with some feeling, you won‘t hurt the engine. Prop driving the engine (negative thrust) has to be avoided due to the  reduction gear.

Fuel system + flooding:

Many twin Cessnas once had fuel pressor sensor for the aux pumps. During take-off, climb and landing the aux pumps were switched on. This did not turn them on, however, until a sensor measured low fuel pressure from the (failing) engine driven fuel pump. Nice idea, but a couple of switches got faulty (at a higher rate than the engine driven pumps) and the pump went to high, flooding the engine. Well, a twin can usually be safely flown on one engine and you could switch the pump off - if you realize what is going on. Thus, the sensor was removed on almost all twin Cessnas and the logics for pump operation were changed.

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Reading further in the book and just got to the joy of icing.  Does FAX model icing, or P3D?  If yes, and which, does the Alabeo C421 model deicing?

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On 5/31/2018 at 10:47 AM, Bert Pieke said:

And.. I splurged and purchased the 800B Owners Manual on line ($10),

I've looked a bit and not found this, where did you purchase you 800B Owner's Manual?

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Many thx, my search kept taking me to places with bad English and great uneasiness.  The C421 is looking like my summer study aircraft, in between plowing up the landscape.  There is so much support for this new aircraft.

 

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Bert,

What was title of the Cessna 800B Autopilot Manual?  Cessna 800b takes me to Cessna 300B, 400B, 800B Integrated Flight Service Parts (part# D4566-13)

 

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9 hours ago, akmatov said:

Two Books by Hal Stoen
The Cessna 421B Owner's Manual $5.00

LOL, thanks for reminding me!
Reading your above post rang a bell... Browsing through my old CD collection... Presto...
A very long time ago (like 10-15 years ago) I bought a CD from Hal Stoen: "Stoenworks Aviation CD", I just found it.
It includes a scanned version of the C421 AOM

You made my day 😊


Location: Vleuten, The Netherlands, 15.7dme EHAM
System: P3D V4 - 80386 DX2 - 4MB RAM - 3dfx Voodoo5 - Windows 3.11

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"Hal Stoen: "Stoenworks Aviation CD""

Thank you for the name he was using for his products.  Sadly Mr. Stoen died in 2016 and his website is down, but I found an archive and will be checking it out.  In addition, to the two books I mentioned above I have his two books of flying VFR and IFR, which are the best I've ever seen, not massively technical, but invaluably informing for a newbie like myself.  He had a good run, but I wish he had had longer (pure selfishness, I like his books).

Archive: http://web.archive.org/web/20160512154839/http://www.stoenworks.com/Aviation home page.html

 

 

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3 hours ago, akmatov said:

"Hal Stoen: "Stoenworks Aviation CD""

Thank you for the name he was using for his products.  Sadly Mr. Stoen died in 2016 and his website is down, but I found an archive and will be checking it out.  In addition, to the two books I mentioned above I have his two books of flying VFR and IFR, which are the best I've ever seen, not massively technical, but invaluably informing for a newbie like myself.  He had a good run, but I wish he had had longer (pure selfishness, I like his books).

Archive: http://web.archive.org/web/20160512154839/http://www.stoenworks.com/Aviation home page.html

 

 

So his 421 appears to have been N1557G.  That would be a great candidate for an honoring repaint for this model.

57Ginflight.jpg


Frank Patton

Gigabyte GA-Z97X-Gaming 7 MOB; i7 4790 4.4Ghz; 16gb DDR3 2300; MSI GTX970 4gb Gaming 100ME, Coolermaster Pro 5 case, Corsair H100i

Former USAF meteorologist and ground weather school instructor; AOPA Member #07379126

There is no limit to what a man can do or where he can go if he doesn’t mind who gets the credit! - Benjamin Jowett

 

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