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Guest Paul Heaney

Check this out... why do Pirates even bother???

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How naive I am. I didn't realize they were so blatent as to have their own websites bragging about it.Your theory is well taken but I suspect many of them are unemployed kids who, for them, hacking (or whatevr they call it these days), is a hobby unto itself. The difficulty... the challenge. So whether they work on it for one hour or ten it wouldn't make much difference.One way to kill two birds with one stone would be to hire them to create the wrapper protection. Like banks who hire ex-theives to see if they can break into them.

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That is a rather nasty site. They're clever blokes though: if you click on any of the "complaint" links to see what victimized publishers wrote to them, it seems that you (apart from reading the rightful complaint) also AUTOMATICALLY send an email to the publisher with a further unkown, but undoubtedly very nasty reply! I made the mistake ('t was early in the morning and I had only one cup of coffee yet - sad grin!) to click on such a link and read the legal complaint of one of the victims of piracy, and only too late I realized that this action automatically sent a (to me unknown) reply to said victim, undoubtedly worded in very unpleasant terms, something like "fugh off", I guess.Sometimes, especially in the morning before my medication and lots of coffee, I am exceedingly stupid. Don't make the same mistake, layz 'n gem, you're dealing with some VERY nasty but also clever pirates (read: criminals) here!Well, I guess I now better run a spyware check.Jaap Verduijn (blushing shamefully with stupidity).

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The forum on that page is so blatent that it's comical. Appears these kids are trying hard.----------------------------------------------------------------John MorganReal World: KGEG, UND Aerospace Spokane Satillite, Private ASEL 141.2 hrs, 314 landings, 46 inst. apprs.Virtual: MSFS 2004"There is a feeling about an airport that no other piece of ground can have. No matter what the name of the country on whose land it lies, an airport is a place you can see and touch that leads to a reality that can only be thought and felt." - The Bridge Across Forever: A Love Story by Richard Bach

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Here's the Registrant info for that site. I can't believe they haven't blocked access to it (I even do that with my sites and I don't have anything to hide). But, then again, this may be phoney information also. Fredrik NeijBox 1206Stockholm11479SEPhone: 46.707323819FAX: 46.707323819Email:tiamo@prq.seDougEdited because I can't spel

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Sweden has rather lax IP laws...I doubt they have the legal power to block it.

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Yeah Jeroen,But not that laxed!This site is apparently dealing with hacking and pirating both wich are illegal in Sweden and reasons to close it.I would blame underfunded IT-police and utter ignorance of the governing bodies to why this site is still up.I have reported it to the swedish authorities however.Cheers,

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>How the government can allow these sites to operate is truly>beyond me. Hi Bryan, Welcome to the world of the first amendment.And while we all value freedom of speech,and expression this is terrible.To correct this you will need to get into the court system.Time $, money $,and uncertainty $, of the out come, are their allies. On a lighter side, I live in North Port Fla. All those "Girlie" requests are a fraud also. This is "The Bone yard here! Maby the author of that garbage lives here?(the Ole leach) Of course your comments are correct. I hope some honor system is alive in our FS world.I believe it is. VIN

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Sure, piracy is bad, but I think the ways in which some companies are responding to piracy are even worse. Remember Sony's recent take on "copy protection"? In their opinion it was "ok" to degrade your computer's performance permanently, cause problems with some CD drives, open your (Windows) computer up to malware and virii AND mess up your MP3 files (irregardless of their legality) if you tried to play them. That's just going too far, if you ask me.And who suffered from this form of DRM (Digital Rights Management)? Not the pirates - heck, they just worked around the protection and produced clean, high-quality digital copies of the CDs for distribution on the net. The only ones to suffer were people who actually bought the CDs and tried to listen to them on their computers. Bet they'll think twice the next time they want to "do the right thing".My point is, piracy doesn't affect just developers - it also indirectly affects those who DO want to pay for the software or media. It's the developers' responsibility to do business in ways which promote legal distribution of their products, instead of going out of their way to make things hard for those who pay them.1) Don't over-charge for your products; drop the price of older (6-12+ months old) products to profit from those who "don't want to pay for the cutting edge" (aka. "beta testing", as is the case with some developers)2) Reward returning or long-time customers and offer pick'n mix bundles. Don't force-feed people bundles you *think* they want - let them choose from a list of products they are genuinely interested in for a reduced price. After all, they might have already bought one of your bundled items and have no need to buy it a second time, while they MIGHT be interested in buying a different kind of bundle3) Offer free, life-time upgrades for the product. Don't make the customer pay for initially missing features and annoying bugs resulting from a way-too-short development cycle (or simply human error)4) Offer interactive, timely support for paying customers (on TOP of a user-friendly and up-to-date FAQ)5) Always, ALWAYS act in a professional manner and do everything you can to give a positive image to potential customers (and anyone else for that matter - remember the grapevine). "Positive" does not mean "perfect" - you don't have to get everything right, as long as you admit faults and react to them swiftly (in ways which benefit the customer, that is)6) Don't make it hard to find facts about your products and allow people to critisize your products (on your own forums, for example), to find this critique (no registration required to READ said forums) and - more importantly - your reactions to them7) Offer money-back guarantee or at the very least full in-store credit for people who are for whatever reason not satisfied with your product8) Most importantly, don't punish the customer for paying you. You do not have the right to slip anything onto the customer's computer without informing them of it IN ADVANCE - that means BEFORE they have paid you (and no, mentioning this in the EULA is not sufficient either - the EULA has been proven not to be a binding contract)Please note that I don't mean to sound critical of any specific developer with the above. It's just that the whole Sony DRM fiasco served as a real eye-opener for many consumers and it SHOULD be a wake-up call for many developers / distributors / producers / whatnot, too.Unfortunately this is not the case everywhere. Apparently media companies in France are trying to ram through legislation which would make many things illegal - including all downloads and freeware as we know it. The whole thing is beyond ridiculous and I for one didn't expect this level of stupidity to emerge so soon after the Sony deal:http://eucd.info/index.php?English-readersIt's so nice to know these guys have their (and everyone else's) customers' best interests in mind .. not. This thing's even worse than the version of EUCD which recently passed here in Finland.

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Check out this link:http://thepiratebay.org/details.php?id=3409075As the developer of the program these guys are trying so hard to steal, this makes me sick. If you have the skills to crack software, then why don't you use your skills to do something more productive like produce your own software? What an utter waste of talent.They haven't cracked my (Flight1) license system yet, but no doubt in time they eventually will.What I find odd though is people who download cracked software will often spend hours and hours trying to get the cracked software to work properly.If you do the math it's not worth it. Let's say you're a minimum wage worker and you make $10 hour.While trying to get your pirated software to download and work, you waste maybe 5 hours. That's $50 worth of time, and there's still an excellent chance at the end of it all that your software will still not work properly because in the process of cracking the software the code often gets damaged.Now, you could have just spent half that amount time (25 dollars worth) and actually bought the product, and you would have been further ahead, not to mention you would have software that works properly, you could show your face on the support forum, and you would be helping ensure that more software gets developed in the future. As for the "I like to try the product first argument before buying it" -that's why Flight1 products have one the best refund policies in the business. That argument just doesn't work.How the government can allow these sites to operate is truly beyond me.Bryan

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The registrar is www.idotz.net based in San Francisco. Maybe a complaint to those guys at least would lock him out from renewing the registration.Most of the registrant information seems to be fake though:Phone and fax numbers goes to a swedish cell phone. The domain prq.se in the email address does not exist.Mr Neij (Probably fake as Nej means No in swedish) hides behind a post office box address.It's sad to see,

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It is against ICAN rules to fake registration information. If indeed his data is fake, a simple email to ICAN challenging the registration would be all that it takes.

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Ah, all the old arguments defending piracy put together in a single posts together with the old tired disclaimer that you don't think piracy is a good thing "but"...Why don't you just admit that you think piracy is 1337 k3w1?

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"Ah, all the old arguments defending piracy put together in a single posts together with the old tired disclaimer that you don't think piracy is a good thing "but"..."I agree with your observation Jeroen. One pet peeve of mine--whether someone raises the issue of piracy, 9/11, crime, etc... is someone using that as an opening for posting of counterpoint or an agenda. Piracy isn't a platform for discussion of DRM or the transgressions of big business. If someone opens a thread on crime, and someone says "crime is a problem but food should be freely given to the poor", maybe it would be more apparent. Or perhaps this--near where I live, some street punks walked into a Subway and literally executed the clerks working there. I would dare anyone to walk into the forums that our community paper has on the issue, and say "yep, that's bad but kids need more to do". It isn't about an agenda, it's about the crime at hand--be it piracy, theft, or terrorism. People who use these threads as openings for a laundry list of issues should think better of it. Little children always like to play the game--you confront them with stealing candy, and they say "yeah, but I had a hard day at school and the teacher was mean to me and Mikey threw water on my bear and my tummy was growling and...." It's cute with children, but with adults it gives me pause.The thread is about a pirate site and a blatant one at that, which appears to be subsidized by porn to boot. Leave the other agendas out of the discussion.-John

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>Yeah Jeroen,>>But not that laxed!>This site is apparently dealing with hacking and pirating both>wich are illegal in Sweden and reasons to close it.>>I would blame underfunded IT-police and utter ignorance of the>governing bodies to why this site is still up.>>I have reported it to the swedish authorities however.>>Cheers,I suspect it is legal. The guy from Uppsala University also admits this. Did not find any indication about hacking, and the stuff about email being send when you read the site doesn't make any sense.You really should try to convince the politicians to change the law, instead of trying to stop people from taking advantage of it.Please do however notice it is not as simple as it might appear. The site does NOT host any copyrighted information, it links to it - but I am quite sure the same can be said about Google. You have to write a law that will outlaw this site, but not Google without mentioning any of the by name. And if providing links allowing people to download copyrighted material should be illegal, then what about links to pages with links to allow download - how far should we go (if you think the copyright holders will only prosecute where it makes sense you are na

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Comparing copyright infringement to terror is nothing but ridiculous. Actually it is a disgusting thing to do as it gives the impression that what the terrorist are doing is nothing worse than copying a few music numbers.

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Please seize and desist from suggesting what I "really" wanted to say. I meant what I wrote and nothing more, there was no "but".Thank you for your co-operation.EDIT:Let me re-phrase that before some smart-aleck comes along and points out that the word "but" did infact appear in my post:"There was no 'but' in my post in the form you implied."There, much better :)

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>How the government can allow these sites to operate is truly>beyond me.Are you talking about the same government that is burned at the stake whenever they try to regulate the internet? :-newburn Cheers!Paul

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It's pretty galling that they would include a link for "donations"

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I really like how you think your dictates on how a developer should go about his business as a means of stopping thieves! That's hog wash..[h4]Randy J. Smith[/h4]AMD 64 4000+|ASUS K8V DELUXE|SAPPHIRE ATI X800XT PE|MUNCHKIN 3200|80 gig SATA|DELL 1905FP 19" LCD|TRACKir PRO|PFC JEPPESEN MOONEY YOKE|CH PRO PEDALS|

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"Comparing copyright infringement to terror is nothing but ridiculous. Actually it is a disgusting thing to do as it gives the impression that what the terrorist are doing is nothing worse than copying a few music numbers."I am not comparing it to terror--I am comparing the behavior of linking an agenda to something that is wrong since it presents a venue for attention. Second, I work in the software industry. Pirates are stealing from me just as much as the thief who points a gun at my head and says "give me your money". No, not just from me. They are stealing from my wife, my daughter, and everyone I am in charge of caring for. It's not "copying a few music numbers". It's cyber thievery, and some companies have gone bankrupt and some families left on the street because of it.-John

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>"Comparing copyright infringement to terror is nothing but>ridiculous. Actually it is a disgusting thing to do as it>gives the impression that what the terrorist are doing is>nothing worse than copying a few music numbers.">>I am not comparing it to terror--I am comparing the behavior>of linking an agenda to something that is wrong since it>presents a venue for attention. Yes, it is discusting when people make that kind of links to something wrong because it presents a venue for attention. We completely agree. But are you aware you just wrote "piracy, 9/11, crime, etc" which to me present a rather obvious attempt to link your agenda to terror. It might not be intended, but the fact is that this is how it looks to me. I can't say if I am the only one seeing it this way, but I somehow doubt it>>Second, I work in the software industry. Pirates are stealing>from me just as much as the thief who points a gun at my head>and says "give me your money". No, not just from me. They>are stealing from my wife, my daughter, and everyone I am in>charge of caring for. It's not "copying a few music numbers".> It's cyber thievery, and some companies have gone bankrupt>and some families left on the street because of it.Copyright infringement is bad. I have never said anything else so trying to make your point by telling me is bad is kind of ridiculous - of course it is. But it is not theft - it is copyright infringement. Please read the appropriate laws if you have any problems understanding the difference. Again, I am not saying it is "better or worse" than theft so no point arguing it - I probably won't disagree (guess what, I'm a software developer) - it's simply another crime, just the same way as murder is not theft (and by the way, your example with a gun, would that not be rubbery?)

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I think you stated your point well and I did not mean to offend in my comments. But in a broader sense what it comes down to is all of these things are crimes, and sometimes we can't imagine one having the degree of impact that it can. People can't fathom cyber crime hurting anyone. It does. It ruins lives. It also destroys potential lives in terms of the intelligent kids and young adults who are duped into wasting their talents. -John

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Bryan, I really thought you were smarter than this. If anyone didn't know about the Pirate Bay, then they do so now, thanks to your post. It never seises to amaze me, how people make these posts complaining, giving would be downloaders access to where to find the software you are trying to protect.

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Hi Paul,I thought about that before posting, but I figure you either buy software or you don't. Exposing Pirate Bay won't make a difference to that. Besides, they haven't cracked the ATR yet :-)Bryan

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> I really like how you think your dictates on how a developer> should go about his business as a means of stopping thieves!> That's hog wash..Then you'll be glad to hear that I said no such thing, Mr. Smith. Honestly.. I shouldn't need to repeat myself when my first post was so clear, but here goes:> It's the developers' responsibility to do business in ways > which PROMOTE LEGAL DISTRIBUTION OF THEIR PRODUCTS, instead > of going out of their way to make things hard for those who > pay them.Where does it say that the developers should STOP THIEVES by being nice? My whole POST was about how the developers should be doing their best to make legal purchase of their products more appealing (and many do).You're likely never going to win over the people who are pre-disposed towards piracy, or as "jwenting" so eloquently put it, think it's "1337 k3w1". They do it for reasons other than their personal opinion of the developer. However, people who for some reason have formed a negative opinion of the developer and therefore illegally copy their products CAN be brought back to line (or more importantly, prevented from resorting to piracy in the first place) by doing the things I listed. As Bryan from FS2Crew wrote in his latest post, people either buy software or they don't; it's as simple as that. By making the legal option more appealing you reach that portion of the populace who are willing to depart with their money in the first place. The other type couldn't care less either way.I hope this helps you and others see my point, which is very much pro-legal.

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