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Doesn't say much... and for some reason I can't get to the downloads page.

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No, it surely doesn't say much! Unless one has the compiler tool mentioned and the sample.asm files, it's pretty worthless. :(

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I'm not surprised. ESP is only available under the Microsoft Volume Licencing Program. It's not intended for casual individual users.http://www.microsoft.com/esp/how_to_buy.htm I don't know what the cheapest licence would be. I guess several hundred dollars.

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>I'm not surprised. ESP is only available under the Microsoft>Volume Licencing Program. It's not intended for casual>individual users.Well, that's not entirely true. Those who have an MSDN Subscription can simply download both ESP and the SDK......of course, an MSDN Subscription isn't cheap either! *:-*

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According to Microsoft:"Microsoft ESP v1.0 client and the Microsoft ESP SDK are available through the Microsoft Volume Licensing program only."My emphasis.

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>According to Microsoft:>>"Microsoft ESP v1.0 client and the Microsoft ESP SDK are>available through the Microsoft Volume Licensing program>only.">>>My emphasis. Yep... Bill's lying and Microsoft's right. ;)

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>According to Microsoft:>>"Microsoft ESP v1.0 client and the Microsoft ESP SDK are>available through the Microsoft Volume Licensing program>only.">>>My emphasis. Developers are the only one's who're likely to have an MSDN (Microsoft Developers Network) subscription. Developers also have no need for five copies of the runtimes.http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/default.aspxhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MSDN"MSDN has historically offered a subscription package whereby developers have access and licenses to use nearly all Microsoft software that has ever been released to the public. Subscriptions are sold on an annual basis, and cost up to $10,939 USD per year per subscription, as it is offered in several tiers. Holders of such subscriptions (except the lowest library-only levels) receive new Microsoft software on DVDs or via downloads every few weeks or months. The software generally comes on specially marked MSDN discs, but contains the identical retail or volume-license software as it is released to the public."My emphasis.I don't know whether an MSDN Subscription is available yet that would be ESP/only, but if not available yet, it will be. There are many developers who's full-time employers have a full MSDN Subscription who've already received the ESP runtime package as well as the SDK.However, it should be noted that -at this juncture at least- the user content and developer tools that may be used in ESPv1.0 are identical to that used by FSX SDK SP2, so no developer actually HAS to have ESPv1.0 themselves to create an end product.

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The purpose of mny post was merely to give a reference to spport my statement abount the Volume Licencing Program.Your second reference is interesting because I did not know that "the MSDN end-user license agreement[1] prohibits use of the software in a business production environment....Such a package provides a single computer enthusiast with access to nearly everything Microsoft offers. However, a business caught with an office full of PC's and servers running the software included in an MSDN subscription without the appropriate non-MSDN licenses for those machines would be treated no differently in a compliance audit than if the software were pirated off the Internet" This would appear to mean that MSDN versions of ESP cannot be used by commercial developers?

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>Your second reference is interesting because I did not know>that "the MSDN end-user license agreement[1] prohibits use>of the software in a business production environment....Such a>package provides a single computer enthusiast with access to>nearly everything Microsoft offers. However, a business caught>with an office full of PC's and servers running the software>included in an MSDN subscription without the appropriate>non-MSDN licenses for those machines would be treated no>differently in a compliance audit than if the software were>pirated off the Internet" >>This would appear to mean that MSDN versions of ESP cannot be>used by commercial developers?The restriction would prevent a "Solution Provider" from using their MSDN License from selling their complete "Solution* (which necessarily includes the ESP runtimes and support modules)."It does not however prevent them from using their MSDN License to develop their "Solution" internally. More to the point though, is that the MSDN License provided ESP software would primarily be used by those who're responsible for creating/testing the content used in any given "Solution."For example, were I to contract with a third-party "Solutions Provider" to create a specific aircraft model or scenery model, it might be to my advantage to purchase an MSDN Subscription so I could receive a single copy of ESP for development purposes. For a one-off project however, it would be overkill, since I could just as easily develop the same content using the FSX SDK SP2 tools. I simply wouldn't be able to test that content in the "Solution Provider's" specific ESP package, and would have to rely on feedback from them regarding any problems.* Note: in this case the term "Solution" is synonymous with a complete user package such as "FSX." A "Solution" should be considered a complete, stand-alone application that an end user would install and run.

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http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/aa948864.aspxI believe that the MSDN licenses prohibit the use of the software in a PRODUCTION environment. The purpose of MSDN is for development and testing purposes, and is specific to the MSDN subscriber. For example, an MSDN license of Office allows a developer to test Office extensions, but the user is not authorized to use Office for business use. From what I read, the same should apply with ESP.Etienne

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Well Etienne, that really is still a bit of a gray area at the moment. This Q&A seems to imply the opposite:"Can I use Visual Studio included in my MSDN subscription to create an executable file and distribute this file for sale?Yes. Applications, utilities, and executables you develop using Visual Studio, Access, or Office Developer can be distributed to customers royalty-free, pursuant to the terms of the corresponding End-User License Agreement (EULA). In addition, there are many redistributable components included with Visual Studio, which you are welcome to incorporate into your applications and distribute pursuant to the terms of the Visual Studio EULA."Especially given that the MSDN ESP release is similar in purpose to that of Visual Studio, that is a means to produce "applications, utilities and executables..."

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Ok... production: This means you're using it for business/personal purposes outside of actual development.Thus if you grab the ESP installation and use it to run an application developed by someone else... you're in violation. If you use ESP to test/develop your own application... you're not in violation.

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