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svezir

CPU Cooler

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In order to get ready for NGX, I am putting together a new system and plan on using i7 930 and overclock it to 3.8 GHz. Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated on air cooled CPU Fan / Cooler combination that can be used to achieve this goal.


Sam Vezir

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The best standard air coolers are the Prolimatech Megahalems and the Thermalright True 120 or the new Venomous X. The Noctua NH-D14 is actually better than the aforementioned ones but its huge size blocks the RAM slots if your DIMMs are above a certain height. (ie, Corsair Dominator with the tall heatsinks)I'm using a Cooler Master Hyper 212+ on my machine, it isn't the best in the world (costs just $30) but it's good enough to do 3.8 @ 1.35v on my i7 860 with HyperThreading off. If you got one of the higher end ones I mentioned, you'll get to 3.8 with HT on easily, and probably 4.2+ with HT off. HT does nothing for FSX (or most any game) anyway, so I'd recommend keeping it off, it generates a ton of heat and limits your total OC. RAW speed on the cores is what's important for gaming, not having the extra 4 virtual threads.


Ryan Maziarz
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I am using the Prolimatech Megahalem and running my 920 at 4.0 ghz. the cpu temps stay well bellow 40c when running normal operations, then when i run flight sim, it get up to around 42-45. so thats what i recommend. denis ndregjoni

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I have a Noctua NH-U12P on my i7 920 running 4 ghz and it works great!Jeff Calder


Jeff Calder

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Thermalright Venomous X/Scythe Ultra Kaze 3000rpm. Keeps my i7 920 @ 4.3Ghz cool.


Shane Gavin

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guys people that are using these coolers, can u give us some of your temperature references?CheersAlex


Alex Ridge

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I just wanted to give a couple tips for people that are new to cooler upgrades and even to some that think they're getting the most from their setup.Bare in mind that one persons temps don't guarantee the same performance because just like our FS installs and addons may vary so do many other important aspects that deal with airflow and heat transfer. There are still several other laws of simple science/physics at play. I have seen systems built by people who I respected highly as builders not pay any attention to the actual airflow of their systems. In other words have 4 fans all blowing into their comp and none blowing out. I've ssen friends and family get cpu coolers and just toss them on, thinking this is the best I'll get out of it which is rarely the case.Airflow:Keep in mind that air tumbles, and air can become stagnant and trapped by other air moving around it. So in example you can have air flow moving around the outside edges of the case beautifully but then have their state of the art CPU cooler blowing the same heated air through the heat sink and have a case that just accumulates the heat and pushes it forward into the top right (when facing the working side of a PC where the front would be to your right) into what is normally the CD/DVD drive bays and normally that corner of a case is a dead end so just accumulates heat. Most coolers blow directly down on the heatsink/cpu and in some "Cases" this can be fine since most cases airflow can be adequate for continuing the heat removal process. It's that aspect I think most people don't think about (Continuing the heat removal process). Most case fans allow for easy removal with just clips holding them in place. If you have the time, I strongly recommend paying attention to which fan is doing what and trying to balance a good flow, keeping air not only moving but getting OUT of your case with no hot spots. Also, never expect even the most well known PC Gaming rig ($5,000+) to have done this, especially not what would be considered as normal/average consumer computers such as Sony, HP/Compaq, Dell etc...Cases: If you're upgrading a comp or building a new one, I strongly recommend a case with lower PSU mounting and ceiling fan. As for CPU cooler, I prefer the one I have or at least the type that the fan is mounted on the side (nearest the ram) so it blows the heat directly into my rare case fan and out of the case and get 0 heat build up.Thermal Grease: In a lot of cases replacing the CPU fan is the biggest tech savvy thing some people will ever do and can be a huge event if you have to take out the motherboard. Since you're already going to order a fan and take on such a task do yourself a favor and get a thermal compound worthy of your efforts. I recommend Arctic 5, it is the premium thermal compound and does make a difference. Some manufacturers still use mercury based grease, which is not only bad for you but doesn't give the heat transfer that a silver or ceramic based compound will. I always use a credit card or license and first scrape off what exists and normally comes preformed and applied to most coolers then apply the same thickness (or less) directly to the CPU, using a credit card or such to spread it evenly. Just a thin coat, not nickle or dime thickness crap. Too little or too much is an important factor as anything else.Balance: Keep your case off the wall and out of desks that have cubby holes with doors to hide your pc in. It's really a balance of what you prefer. I well cooled PC or a quiet one, but those desks are normally pushed fairly close to the wall and have terrible airflow that can increase your case temps insanely.Hope this helps. For the record I am using this cooler and this case. My case is crammed with tons of hadware and cables but my airflow is excellent and temps are normally low 40c's.


i9 10920x @ 4.8 ~ MSI Creator x299 ~ 256 Gb 3600 G.Skill Trident Z Royal ~ EVGA RTX 2080ti ~ Sim drive = M.2  2-TB ~ OS drive = M.2 is 512-gb ~ 5 other Samsung Pro/Evo mix SSD's ~ EVGA 1600w ~ Win 10 Pro

Dan Prunier

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people that are using these coolers, can u give us some of your temperature references?
See sig for cooler and approx temp. Temps need to be compared with came method of measuring/reporting - TrueTemp seems to be used a lot.I second Turbine77's tip on flow and application of thermal grease. In my Antec 902 case, I turned off the top large fan (220mm if I recall correctly) since it was hindering flow from front to rear, and temps went down a few degrees C.If I was to rebuild today, it would be with the Prolimatech Megahalem. Hope this helps.

Cheers, Scott Ball

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I turned off the top large fan (220mm if I recall correctly) since it was hindering flow from front to rear, and temps
This is a great point in regard to airflow and system specifics. Not many people would think that disabling a case fan could help with overall airflow but it can. I remember when I started PC builds and my first having about 9 fans. Since then I have more than doubled my airflow by reducing my fans and paying more attention to the actual flow.

i9 10920x @ 4.8 ~ MSI Creator x299 ~ 256 Gb 3600 G.Skill Trident Z Royal ~ EVGA RTX 2080ti ~ Sim drive = M.2  2-TB ~ OS drive = M.2 is 512-gb ~ 5 other Samsung Pro/Evo mix SSD's ~ EVGA 1600w ~ Win 10 Pro

Dan Prunier

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Thermal Grease: In a lot of cases replacing the CPU fan is the biggest tech savvy thing some people will ever do and can be a huge event if you have to take out the motherboard. Since you're already going to order a fan and take on such a task do yourself a favor and get a thermal compound worthy of your efforts. I recommend Arctic 5, it is the premium thermal compound and does make a difference. Some manufacturers still use mercury based grease, which is not only bad for you but doesn't give the heat transfer that a silver or ceramic based compound will. I always use a credit card or license and first scrape off what exists and normally comes preformed and applied to most coolers then apply the same thickness (or less) directly to the CPU, using a credit card or such to spread it evenly. Just a thin coat, not nickle or dime thickness crap. Too little or too much is an important factor as anything else.
Regarding thermal compound application, this article is basically the gold standard on OCing sites and forums:http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?opti...0&Itemid=38Using their method on my Hyper 212+ (filing in the vertical gaps between the direct touch heatpipes and the base) lowered the temps pretty drastically vs. not doing it.A lot of people recommend compound other than Arctic Silver 5 too btw - it was tops back in the day, but there's several other compounds now like OCZ Freeze, Arctic Cooling MX-2 (not the same brand as Arctic Silver) and a couple others that perform better consistently in temp benchmarks. I used OCZ Freeze on mine - has the added bonus of being much easier to deal with than the AS5 as far as spreading and cleaning it too.

Ryan Maziarz
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Well, I don't feel like arguing but just trying to help, but I do disagree. At least with "A lot of people recommend compound other than Arctic Silver 5 too btw" I really don't care that a lot of people recommend anything. I have experience enough with hardware (More than most) and gave good advice. I get my data from working with the different types and AC5 I actually prefer mostly because how it performs all around (Much better dexterity, longevity and ease of spreading than OCZ's). Anywho, I still perfer AS5 but either are fine even if your the geekiest of geeks I would be surprised if you see a single degree difference. Comparing the two against each other is pointless and the key points I think I covered, the main thing if you're going through the trouble of replacing a cpu cooler, you might as well also invest in a good compound. My write up was also all you'll need to know to greatly improve aspects some might (and often do) over look. No need to study, or read links unless of course you're really getting into it. You will find though from what I said there will be no links that can argue or dispute any of it, just preference if anything.Also and "BTW" if all you want to do is try and insult whatever I have to say Ryan, then kick my @$$ out of your forum. All I ever do is attempt to help others and if that bothers you in some way then I guess I'll just stfu. For those that want to improve their cooling without the need to have to learn more than they might not want to, read what I said in my 1st post. It was meant to educate and not to belittle any other posts.


i9 10920x @ 4.8 ~ MSI Creator x299 ~ 256 Gb 3600 G.Skill Trident Z Royal ~ EVGA RTX 2080ti ~ Sim drive = M.2  2-TB ~ OS drive = M.2 is 512-gb ~ 5 other Samsung Pro/Evo mix SSD's ~ EVGA 1600w ~ Win 10 Pro

Dan Prunier

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Me, I am going for a I7 980X with an Artic Freezer Pro 7.6 Cores and multi-threading.--John Veldthuis


John Veldthuis

Specs: ASUS X79-DELUXE | Intel Core i7-5960X Extreme @ 4.2Ghz | Gigabyte GeForce GTX980 | 32GB Ram | Cooler Master HAF 932 case | ASUS PB279Q, 4K UHD, 27" Monitor | Windows 8.1 | Segate 2x2TB 7200rpm drives, SanDisk 2x256GB SSD| Corsair Hydro Series H105, Watercooling kit

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My i7 tops out at 70c after an hour of OCCT Linpack, which is designed to really push the heat. Prime95 only pushes it to around 62c.


Shane Gavin

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