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linux731

Flying as First Officer

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Has anyone here tried flying the NGX from the FO view? It's so hard! Especially taking off... You lose sense of the centerline.

 

I can't imagine what First Officers feel when they move on to being Captains... :LMAO:

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Has anyone here tried flying the NGX from the FO view? It's so hard! Especially taking off... You lose sense of the centerline.

 

I can't imagine what First Officers feel when they move on to being Captains... :LMAO:

 

A Delta 777 FO was once a Delta 737 Captain. The only time that I can see a Captain having diffculty getting used to the left seat is if he never flew from the left seat (i.e. ink on the license is still wet).

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(i.e. ink on the license is still wet).

 

:LMAO: :LMAO: :LMAO:

 

I see what you're saying, though.

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As I was told a long time ago while transitioning from single engine jets to transports, "Put the centerline right between your legs." It is human nature to want to correct for the perceived offset since you are sitting off of the centerline in either the left or right seat. But maybe six inches off of the centerline? Not far enough to matter.

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If the runway is fitted with centerline lighting, a lot of crew will deliberately offset the aircraft from the centerline slightly to avoid the 'ba-dumph ba-dumph ba-dumph" sound as the nosewheel hits the light fittings.

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If the runway is fitted with centerline lighting, a lot of crew will deliberately offset the aircraft from the centerline slightly to avoid the 'ba-dumph ba-dumph ba-dumph" sound as the nosewheel hits the light fittings.

Oh really? I didn't know! I thought the lights were actually underground, and the top was just a glass piece so that the lights can hold the weight of the airplane.

 

 

EDIT:

 

I was thinking it was something like this:

 

adventures.1234864980.lights-in-ground-with-random-things-inside.jpg

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Oh really? I didn't know! I thought the lights were actually underground, and the top was just a glass piece so that the lights can hold the weight of the airplane.

 

I think that most runway centerline lights are like the lights on interstate highways to mark lane dividers. They're not exactly flat...

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Now you have a feeling of what it's like to transition into CFI training from the Commercial Rating. That sucks!

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It is pretty different flying from the FO side I must say, however yeh shoot me down this might be sad but until I'm Captain with the VA I'm with, I will be flying from the FO side, its actually pretty cool once you get used to it :D

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Now you have a feeling of what it's like to transition into CFI training from the Commercial Rating. That sucks!

 

Zach, you'll get used to it in no time, it'll just kick in and become normal. You'll actually learn more about landing as a CFI, since you'll have to be recovering your new students from bouncing down the runway, flaring too early, etc.. Make sure you learn how to recover from a spin during all types of stalls and during Minimum Controllable Airspeed. I had a couple students back in the day during MCA who spun the plane and they never set foot in an aircraft again..

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The biggest change is right and left seat in an Airbus. Getting used to using only left or right hand on the side stick takes some time!

 

Guess thats almost the same in Boeings, especially with manual thrust. The F/O uses right hand on the control collum, and left on the thrustlevers. The captain is just oposite

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EDIT:

 

I was thinking it was something like this:

 

adventures.1234864980.lights-in-ground-with-random-things-inside.jpg

Edited by linux731, Today, 12:43 PM.

 

If only I was that starfish.

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The biggest change is right and left seat in an Airbus. Getting used to using only left or right hand on the side stick takes some time!

Oh wow, Airbuses do look hard! It would be even worse if the co pilot was a lefty. After all, those planes pilot themselves.

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In my experience it doesn't feel any different whether you fly with the left or right hand on a control stick (same thing with driving a car for that matter). Or, if you fly Airbus, it doesn't matter which hand you use to push the buttons :-)

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The airbus shouldn't be anyharder than the conventional yoke setup. As you use one hand on the throttles and another on the yoke/sidestick/whatevercontrollsystemyoucouldpossiblycomeupwith!

 

From my experience it really only takes a few minutes to get used to the switched sides.

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In my experience it doesn't feel any different whether you fly with the left or right hand on a control stick (same thing with driving a car for that matter). Or, if you fly Airbus, it doesn't matter which hand you use to push the buttons :-)

lol didnt know cars came with control sticks must be a new design that came out recently :)

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lol didnt know cars came with control sticks must be a new design that came out recently :)

 

 

yes, Airbus is looking into new markets with the development of the groundbreaking "Groundbus G320". It has drive by wire which prevents the driver from taking any wrong turns.

 

Obviously my point was when you drive a car it doesn't matter if it is a left or right-hand traffic system car, you can steer with either hand. Just remember which way to enter a roundabout ;-)

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you can steer with either hand

we are taught to drive with 2 hands unless you have only one arm than you have a speciall licence for that:)

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we are taught to drive with 2 hands

 

so are we [clears throat, whistles innocently] :-)

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I've been flying exclusively from the right seat since i bought the NGX. I'm still an F.O. in the 73 for DeltaVA and plan to be until I have time to sit, watch, and read the manuals, and videos from AOA until i understand the airplane like the back of my hand. I've played around flying from the skipper's side before and i find it just as awkward as you did flying on the right side Diego.

 

Big%20Grin.gif

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The airbus shouldn't be anyharder than the conventional yoke setup. As you use one hand on the throttles and another on the yoke/sidestick/whatevercontrollsystemyoucouldpossiblycomeupwith!

 

From my experience it really only takes a few minutes to get used to the switched sides.

 

Your hand isn't on a throttle that often since you are almost always using auto-throttle.

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Both hands on yoke, Throttle, MCP, Radios and Flight Director selections controlled by the force. Jedi Pilots FTW!

 

:LMAO:

 

All these "Airbus is bad because it's all automated and we like both hands on yokes and we use Autothrottle till 50ft/after touchdown in flare mode".

 

The mind boggles.

 

One hand on Stick/Sidestick/Yoke/Bike Handles, the other hand on throttle/avionics. Or are you saying Airbus aircraft are better suited for manual flight than Boeing/Embraier/McDD/BAE aircraft? Or that you have one pilot handle the yoke and a different person handling the throttles or you have Telekenetic mind control?

 

Remember, those footpedals are Rudders, not Throttles. An Airplane isn't a car.

 

Also, it does matter which hand you use, If you decide to have your hands crossing over your body with your arms crossed, your just being stupid, and are limiting your control strength. If (as per captains seat) your right hand is near the throttle and your left hand is up near the outboard window, you use the left hand on the yoke/stick. You don't get your left hand and cross it over to the right side of the body to hold the throttle (if you can even reach over that far).

 

Trent Hopkinson

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Your hand isn't on a throttle that often since you are almost always using auto-throttle.

 

Rather have a PF backing up the thrust levers than just saying that the computers will never let you down.

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