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Kepti

Vamos a la playa! | NAX41Q | ESSA-GCLP | B738

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Hey and welcome back to my series of different, high realism aiming, stories!

 

This one is actually 6 months old already, presented first in a Finnish simulator discussions. The pictures are not as wide as they're in my previous story (check the URL below), but I'm just sure you can still enjoy it. Please forgive my english, I'm not a native speaker. Anyways, let's get into the business!

 

http://forum.avsim.n...rp-blx472-b738/

 

Today you will be travelling with captain Lindén from Stockholm, Sweden to another highly tourist populated destinations, the Canary Islands. Las Palmas is the biggest island in the Canaries, and it gets it's income mainly from the tourists. We will make sure that the people will get their money in the future as well. The weather in Las Palmas is beneficial for a Scandinavian tourist - it's always warm and an ideal place for burning your skin. So you can prove to your family and friends that you didn't just lie in your hotel room.

 

So prepare your sunglasses and sun lotios, we are leaving towards to Las Palmas now!

 

It was cold day in last December when my duty list was filled with this flight to Las Palmas. I was excited to leave the cold and snowy Sweden towards to the warm Canary. The flight number is DY 4241, departing from Arlanda to Las Palmas. To ensure that the ATC would understand us, our callsign is called "Norshuttle" 4-1-Quebec. Our plane is a Boeing 737-800, precisely it's registration is LN-DYS, which is actually only 6 months old. It's equipped with a ROW44 -system, which gives the passengers an opportunity to surf the internet during the flight via the WiFi system for free. The planes also has a advanced lighting system, which is changing it's colour all the time, so the passengers don't get bored to the decoration during the 6 hour flight.

What tickles us the most is the carbon brakes, automated probeheat system, and a little bit more advanced FMC software.

Our flight is scheduled to leave at 1000Z, which is 1100 o'clock in the blue and yellow time (read: swedish time). The weather in Arlanda is gray and rainy and our plane is looking for us at the stand number 64. Before getting into our plane, we will go to the briefing and check the plane documents, navlog, weather, notams, charts, etc...

We will also receive our flightplan, which we will agree and send it to the Eurocontrol.

 

It looks like this:

 

(FPL-NAX41Q-IS

-B738/M-HSIPRWXYJ/S

-ESSA1000

-N0450F360 NOSLI N850 BAGOS/N0449F350 UN850 MIC UZ707

KOMOT/N0453F370 UZ707 BSN UZ912 PON UN872 RALUS DCT

BAROK/N0445F390 UN873 SAMAR

-GCLP0536 GCTS

-EET/EKDK0044 EDVV0057 EDGG0138 EBBU0139 EHAA0139 LFFF0147

LFRR0219 LECM0259 LPPC0323 GMMM0411 GCCC0500 REG/LNDYS

SEL/BEDF DAT/V RVR/200 DOF/111217)

 

So our route starts today from an intersection called NOSLI, towards to south. We are passing the cities of Copenhagen, Hamburg, Paris. Eventually we will hit the Bay of Biscay and then fly over the Spanish airspace, which after we will hit the Portugal towards the Atlantic Ocean and Las Palmas. Estimated flight time is five ours and 36 minutes today, and the alternative airport is Teneriffa South.

 

There is a jetstream blowing over the Spanish airspace at FL370 towards to east, which might cause us a little bit lower airspeeds during that peak. Otherwise, there is a light headwind all the way down to the Las Palmas. We are expecting to have a cloudy flight all the way, and no turbulence expected.

 

Now we can head towards to terminal two with our crew, and seek for the gate number 64. The first officer will be going to the cockpit, I will wear a safety vest and go make the exterior walk around.

 

aloitus.jpg

 

Stepping inside the low cockpit door I can see my office for the following six hours. The ground crew has left ground power on, and the external air is making the air flow in the cabin and cockpit. It's necessary to maintain air inside 24/7, otherwise the temperatures will fall during the night.

1.jpg

 

The day will begin by making the cockpit flows. In this picture I'm looking for the overhead after the first officer has pressed the light test, which has to be completed before the first flight of the day. Every lights seem to be working with a quick look. Also the switches are in the right positions for this part of the flight. The most important is fuel pumps off, ground power selected, windows heated, hydraulics off, air conditing on, and so on....

 

2.jpg

 

After moving down with me flow check, we are performing a fire system test, which is making a funny sound while doing it. Luckily this is done before the passengers take their seats. :Liar:

 

3.jpg

 

The following part is my favourite, filling up the flight computers. FMC will be filled up with a route, weight, balance, performance and wind information. Without this device the flight would be a little more challenging to us, not impossible though!

4.jpg

 

So the plane starts to be ready to go. Now we will be thinking about the performance numbers and I will state the takeoff briefing.

 

5.jpg

 

There is 148 passengers onboard, and together with the cargo it makes 13 100 kilograms of payload.

So the zero fuel weight is 56 300 kilograms today.

We will be taking a fuel load of 16 500 kilograms:

 

 

TRIP: 13.6t (5h 36min)

CF: 0.7t

TAXI: 0.2t

FRES: 1.1t (30min)

ALT: 1.0t (19min)

_______________

REQ: 16.5t (6h 25min)

 

ZFW of 56.3t and a fuel load of 16.5t makes the takeoff mass 72 700 kilograms.

 

 

The weather in Arlanda during the departure is the following:

ESSA 170950Z 03014KT 7000 -SNRA OVC006 02/01 Q0985 R88/2901095 TEMPO SNRA 3000

 

The wind is 030 degrees and 14 knots, visibility is 7 kilometers. Light snow-rain and an overcast located 600ft above the ground level. Temperature is 2 degrees, dewpoint one degree. The snowing rain might get worser eventually and the visibility can drop all the way down to 3000 meters.

We will be given the runway 08, and the cross wind component in that case is around 10 knots. It will be tight takeoff.

 

After putting the previous numbers to the EFB (electronic flight bag), it gives us the following performance for runway 08:

 

We will takeoff with a full thrust of 26K (because of the slush in the runway) with bleeds and engine anti-ice on. Engine N1 is around 90%:

 

FLAPS 10

V1 134

VR 142

V2 149

 

STOP MARGIN 566 METERS

 

Then I will read you the takeoff briefing:

 

We will be taxiing from stand 64 to a holding point X2 runway 08, via UB, U, Y, X taxiways. So just follow the red line I made for you.

 

essaground.jpg

Then we will perform a takeoff from runway 08 with the previous vlues. If there will be a failure during the takeoff roll before 80 knots, I will be shouting "stopping" and we will make the plane stop. If there is something between 80 knots to V1, such as engine failure or other major failure, I will either call "stopping" or "continue". After V1 we will be getting airborne, no matter what will happen. If there is an engine failure after takeoff, we will be continuing straight ahead to 1700 feet, which after a right hand turn to TEB VOR hold.

 

After getting airborne normally, what we of course expect, we will be flying a NOSLI 4L -departure routing. It will be done like the chart below says. So we will fly straight ahead to SA412 -intersection, which after a left hand turn maintaining 205 knots to intersection SA414, which after to the NOSLI. We will maintain 250 knots below FL100, transition altitude is 5000 feet and we're not going higher than that without the ATC instruction. We have selected Arlanda VOR 116.0 and Dunker VOR 116.8 to our NAV radios.

 

essadep.jpg

 

Briefing is completed and all the passengers are onboard. We are starting the APU and reading the before start checklist. Doors and windows closed, cockpit door locked, beacon is on, transponder standby.

 

The engine start procedure is familiar already; starting the ignition and when the turbine is at 25% we will be putting the fuel in. So here goes engine number two!

 

6.jpg

 

Fuel to the engine!

 

7.jpg

 

And now we are ready taxi via the same route I brieffed before. Flaps will be selected to 10 followed by after start checklist. At the same time the ground crew is removing the pushback truck.

 

8.jpg

 

Leaving terminal two behind. Bye Stockholm!

 

9.jpg

 

X2 is approaching and the snow rain is getting worser, as expected in the metar. It's time to call "cabin crew, seats for takeoff!"- to the cabin and turn the transponder active with strobelights on.

 

10.jpg

 

And off we go. The time is 10:14Z, which is almost 15 minutes "late" of our original schedule. I'm arming the autothrottle, increasing 40% of thrust and shouting "takeoff!". Like this the takeoff thrust is going up itself.

 

11.jpg

 

V1, Rotate! Slowly lightening the nose gear and pulling the plane to the sky.

 

12.jpg

 

Positive, gear up!

 

13.jpg

 

It's a company procedure to turn the LNAV on at 400ft AGL, and after throttle reduction we are selecting the level change -mode, at the same time taking the flaps in. At 3000 feet the VNAV will be given the comand.

 

14.jpg

 

Through the overcast to the clear sky.

 

15.jpg

 

Passing FL100, lights, signs, engine start switches.....

 

16.jpg

 

And so we are in the clear sky towards to our initial cleared flight level 350. Sunglasses on again, gentemen!

 

17.jpg

 

Here we are, at flight level 340, which is two thousand feet below the planned flight level. We had to do this because of the other traffic above us. Great controlling in IVAO Sweden.

 

18.jpg

 

Terrible art of our contrail.

 

19.jpg

 

A lot of traffic in German airspace.

 

20.jpg

 

First step to FL370 and a artistic viewpoint.

 

21.jpg

 

You are able to see the shape of the earth from this altitude. You might be also wondering, why the IAS is so high. This is because the Norwegian is using cost index of 200 when flying to Canary Islands, don't ask me why!

 

22.jpg

 

And the last step to FL390 in the Spanish airspace, which is the final altitude of ours today. We will be looking at the earth from here a couple of hours longer.

 

23.jpg

 

Then it's time for our approach briefing. Five hours of flying time behind us.

 

The weather in Las Palmas is expected to be the following:

GCLP 171500Z 01021KT 330V030 9999 SCT030 21/12 Q1026 NOSIG

 

So the wind is a typical Canarywind, blowing from north with a strenght of 21 knots. Visibility is over 10 kilometrs, temperature is the same with wind strenght. QNH 1026.

We will use runway 03L today, with a minor cross wind.

 

Landing mass is 58 200 kilograms. It is giving the following performance to our landing with our EFB:

 

We will use flaps 30

VREF 138

VAPP 138 + 10 (headwind component / 2) = 148

 

We will use autobrake setting number three, which will give a landing distance of 1400 meters with reverse thrust and spoilers. We have also checked the brake temperature charts, and we are able to cool them down during the turnaround.

 

Then the routing itself. We will be flying a SAMAR 1Z arrival route, which is again marked with red. From SAMAR we will fly direct to ISORU -intersection, followed by COLON and Gran Canaria VOR. 250 knots below flight level 150.

 

gclparr.jpg

 

Whichafter we will be flying a ILS Z -approach for runway 03L. After getting to LPC VOR, where we should be at 5000 feet, we are making a offset racetrack. First we will be flying to a heading 177 for 9 nautical miles, descenting to 3800 feet at the same time. After 9nm we are flying inbound course of 027 and capturing the localizer followed by the glide slope. The glide will start from 8 nautical miles before the VOR, minimum of 350 feet.

If we have a go around, we will follow the red marked route.

So it's a pretty typical day at work, the only difference is the slightly strong wind.

 

gclpils.jpg

 

This is how the previous plan looks like in ND display.

 

24.jpg

 

Inserting the wind data to the wormbox before descenting.

 

26.jpg

 

So here we go again after a five hour flight. Straight down to 5000 feet, you can see the island up ahead already. At this time we are asking for the passengers to sit down, so the cabin crew can prepare the cabin for approach already.

 

27.jpg

 

Scattered clouds while going down...

 

28.jpg

 

The action starts now. We've just passed the VOR and we will be performing the manouvers to get the plane to the localizer. Speed is going down to 210 knots, which has to be achieved before the racetrack.

 

29.jpg

 

After nine nautical miles we're making a right turn to establish the localizer. Good view to the shore.

 

30.jpg

 

And localizer established! Trying our best to get the speed down to 160 knots and adding the flaps at the same time.

 

31.jpg

 

And off we go to the glide, gear down, "cabin crew, seats for landing, please!". At this time the wind started to shake the plane from left to right, so I decided to maintain the autopilot on until it would be safer to fly myself.

 

32.jpg

 

We've passed the minimums, and only the flare and we're ready!

 

33.jpg

 

After 1400 meters vacating the runway to the left via foxtrot. Flying time is precisely five hours and 36 minutes, as we calculated. Good job!

 

34.jpg

 

Taxiing in front of the terminal, engines shutoff, seatbelts off, hydraulics off, fuel pumps off, air conditioning off, IRS realign, ......

 

35.jpg

 

The last passengers saw some ATRs while leaving the plane.

 

36.jpg

 

I really hope you enjoyed this story as well. I really like making these, and hopefully you can comment and give me suggestions to the future development.

 

Best regards,

 

Aleksi


PMDG & MAJESTIC SOFTWARE BETA

CPL (A) + ME/IR

Aleksi Lindén

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Another entertaining and interesting read. Thanks for taking the time to post them! :)


Danny Welsh

 

 

PMDG_ngx_T7_sig.jpg

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Very niceeeeeeeee i like it :)

 

i waiting the next fly with impatience :)


Bizzy dee

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Thank you guys!

 

Alberto; I'm sure to try these when I go there next time!

 

Alex; sorry I didn't catch your point? What do you mean by this?

 

Regards,


PMDG & MAJESTIC SOFTWARE BETA

CPL (A) + ME/IR

Aleksi Lindén

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Wow!!

 

That was excellently put together and good fun!

 

Well done and thanks for sharing your story!


Chris Howard
 

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Thank you guys!

 

Alberto; I'm sure to try these when I go there next time!

 

Alex; sorry I didn't catch your point? What do you mean by this?

 

Regards,

 

Ok. You can watch a video someone else uploaded to youtube: [media=]

[/media]

 

Alberto Sánchez

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Looks like your planned alternate was the atlantic ocean...

LOL

 

Thank you guys!

 

Alberto; I'm sure to try these when I go there next time!

 

Alex; sorry I didn't catch your point? What do you mean by this?

 

Regards,

That's because your fuel quantity indicators are yellow...it means you are low fuel.

fs2crew_linepilot.png

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Guys, I'm still running 1600 kilograms of fuel while on blocks. That is precisely the amount planned as you can see in the beginning lf the story where I present the weight and fuel calculations!


PMDG & MAJESTIC SOFTWARE BETA

CPL (A) + ME/IR

Aleksi Lindén

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Hi,

 

Nice story.Norwegian are using 40 as a CI for the Canary Islands withh the pilots allowed to increase the CI if delayed.


Norman Bowman

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Hi,

 

Nice story.Norwegian are using 40 as a CI for the Canary Islands withh the pilots allowed to increase the CI if delayed.

 

Hey and thanks, Norman! By the time of this flight (December, 2011) Norwegian used CI200 for this flight. A close friend in a company...


PMDG & MAJESTIC SOFTWARE BETA

CPL (A) + ME/IR

Aleksi Lindén

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Enjoyed the read and the photos


"I am the Master of the Fist!" -Akuma
 

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