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TechguyMaxC

Ivy Bridge Pictorial De-lidding Guide

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This thread is included as a convenience only and does not constitute endorsement by AVSIM. By de-lidding your CPU you WILL void your warranty and could accidentally damage your processor. AVSIM does not recommend any process or equipment alterations which do not adhere to the original equipment manufacturers specifications or operating procedures. If you follow the de-lidding procedure outlined here, you do so at your own risk. Avsim is not liable for any damage.

 

What's this de-lidding business?

De-lidding is a procedure used by overclockers/modders to remove the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS) from their CPU. It is best accomplished with a bare razor blade or an exacto knife. It is being performed by overclockers of Ivy Bridge chips (Intel 3xxx line, excluding the 38xx and 39xx chips) and should not/cannot be performed on any other modern Intel chips.

 

Background/theory:

So Ivy Bridge runs hot when you overclock, specifically when you overvolt. This is due to a manufacturing decision Intel made with Ivy Bridge to use a Thermal Interface Material (TIM) between the CPU die and the IHS, rather than a fluxless solder as has been used traditionally. The TIM Intel chose is of extremely poor quality, as well as being a very thick layer. TIM does not conduct heat as well as metal, nowhere near as well in fact and so a TIM which is of poor quality to begin with, and is slathered on in a very thick layer will produce the ridiculously high temperatures that Ivy Bridge reaches when overclocked unless one performs this modification.

 

In order to get the most out of a CPU overclock, you have to overvolt, some chips more than others. For example, I have to run a staggering 1.5V on my chip to hit 4.9GHz with a 2.6GHz RAM speed. That is with extremely good water cooling and the best TIM money can buy, (Coollaboratory Liquid Pro) in addition to flat mating surfaces achieved via lapping (sanding down to flat). Lower temperatures means your chip will need lower voltage so in theory a chip at say 0 degrees C operating temperature will require a lower voltage (Vcore) to hit say 5GHz than one running at 80 degrees C.

 

Necessary equipment:

Razor blade/exacto knife

rubbing alcohol

aftermarket TIM

 

Time for procedure:

5-15 minutes

 

 

Procedure:

Take your razor blade and gently slide it in under the IHS at any corner of the CPU like so:

 

 

 

You then want to work the blade side-to-side:

 

 

 

Once you have done this you will feel the blade can now be pushed in further, go ahead and do so now using your thumb like this. You can continue pushing until about this point, be careful not to go in too far or you may contact the CPU die and potentially damage it. If you push the blade in and feel resistance, STOP!

 

 

 

 

 

Next you will want to "sweep" along the edges, working the blade in on the sides rather than the corners, using each "cleared" corner as a starting point to sweep the edges. This is what a "cleared" corner should look like:

 

 

 

Repeat this procedure at all 4 corners. Once you are done, clearing the corners and sweeping the sides it may be necessary to further sweep the sides as seen here:

 

 

 

 

 

When done you will be able to simply lift off the IHS like this:

 

 

 

The next step is to clean off the thermal paste with some rubbing alcohol and a paper towel. No special instructions here. The next step is to remove the epoxy from the CPU package. You can simply use your fingernail to scrape away the black epoxy all around the edge of the CPU package. This will help to ensure the IHS sits as close to the CPU die as possible and allow us to use the least amount of TIM. When done it will look like this:

 

 

 

The final step is to apply your choice of TIM. I recommend using a liquid metal TIM such as Coollaboratory Liquid Pro or Liquid Ultra, Phobya Liquid Metal is a good option as well. In my testing, temperature drops by 20-30 degrees C over the stock thermal paste with the use of any liquid metal TIM when applied properly. Note: it may be necessary to apply some liquid metal to the underside of the IHS. You can check this by placing the IHS on the CPU die (simply let it rest, no force required, no need to use any adhesive to re-attach either) and placing the CPU back in the socket on the motherboard. You then use the CPU retention mechanism to hold it in place. Remove the CPU from the socket and the lid from the CPU to check the contact of the TIM. If you don't see a nice even splotch of TIM on the underside of the IHS go ahead and apply a thin layer of TIM to the underside of the IHS and then reinstall the CPU in the socket as described above.

 

For further temperature reduction one can lap their IHS (top side only!) and heatsink/waterblock base.

 

Good luck, and happy overclocking!

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Is your computer experiencing Blue screen errors? Download BlueScreenView and post a screenshot of the error.
BSODs related to overclocking and their solutions can be found in this thread @ Xtremesystems.
Intel desktop CPU de-lidding tutorial: right here at Avsim

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Thank you TechguyMaxC for this step by step guide.

 

I will pin it and hope that anyone who attempts doing this procedure can benefit from your expertise. For all those who intend to follow this procedure, please read the AVSIM disclaimer on the first post of this thread.

 

Happy flying!

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Indeed thank you very much for this procedure description, and thanks to Stephen for pinning this, otherwise I wouldn't have found it!

 

So the question I have in relation to the de-lidding is that, when the whole procedure is over and you go and mount your main heatsink (water or fan), should you apply more liquid TIM on top of that metal 'lid'? Or should we use some other thermal paste, maybe ones they supplied?

 

Thanks in advance


Brendan Chen

 

Learning to use and getting use to FSX!

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Indeed thank you very much for this procedure description, and thanks to Stephen for pinning this, otherwise I wouldn't have found it!

 

So the question I have in relation to the de-lidding is that, when the whole procedure is over and you go and mount your main heatsink (water or fan), should you apply more liquid TIM on top of that metal 'lid'? Or should we use some other thermal paste, maybe ones they supplied?

 

Thanks in advance

 

You definitely need to apply TIM on the top (outer) portion of the lid. It should resemble something like this:

 

CPU DIE -> TIM -> LID -> TIM -> HEATSINK/WATERBLOCK

 

As for TIM, you should use the same for both. Like Tech states, Coollaboratory Pro is the best, though I use the Ultra variant and have zero problems with it.

 

Recommendation... If you or anyone is going to go through the trouble of de-lidding, go ahead and lap your lid and heatsink too! Gives you peace of mind knowing you did everything possible you could to get the best temps for your OC.

 

Trust me, if you don't, you will always to wondering if you could squeeze an extra C degrees off. This leads to disassembling and re-assembling which leads to problems in the long run. Do it all and right from the start.


Regards,

Efrain Ruiz
LiveDISPATCH @ http://www.livedispatch.org (CLOSED) ☹️

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Against my better judgement, I delidded my IB over the weekend and this is what I got so far:

 

i7-3770k - 4.7 OC 1.29v (CPU-Z)

 

Core Temp readings:

 

Idle = mid 20s ,so far so good. Previously mid to high 30s.

 

Under load IBT = 90C+ :shok: .Previously low 80s.

 

I think my CPU is psychotic.


Bert dela Merced

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Against my better judgement, I delidded my IB over the weekend and this is what I got so far:

 

i7-3770k - 4.7 OC 1.29v (CPU-Z)

 

Core Temp readings:

 

Idle = mid 20s ,so far so good. Previously mid to high 30s.

 

Under load IBT = 90C+ :shok: .Previously low 80s.

 

I think my CPU is psychotic.

 

Try re-seating the heatsink and make sure to tighten it evenly. If it's not properly seated, you will get higher temps especially under full load.


Regards,

Efrain Ruiz
LiveDISPATCH @ http://www.livedispatch.org (CLOSED) ☹️

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I still have my SB chip, however, this is an interesting post. Once you have cleaned off the thermal paste, and applied the new paste (would be interested in your technique to get correct thickness), how do you re-secure the lid again? Just it just sit on or do you need more epoxy?


Mark W   CYYZ      

My Simhttps://goo.gl/photos/oic45LSoaHKEgU8E9

My Concorde Tutorial Videos available here:  https://www.youtube.com/user/UPS1000
 

 

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Against my better judgement, I delidded my IB over the weekend and this is what I got so far:

 

i7-3770k - 4.7 OC 1.29v (CPU-Z)

 

Core Temp readings:

 

Idle = mid 20s ,so far so good. Previously mid to high 30s.

 

Under load IBT = 90C+ :shok: .Previously low 80s.

 

I think my CPU is psychotic.

 

I'll quote myself here, as I'm fairly certain this will help you, specifically the bold part:

 

The final step is to apply your choice of TIM. I recommend using a liquid metal TIM such as Coollaboratory Liquid Pro or Liquid Ultra, Phobya Liquid Metal is a good option as well. In my testing, temperature drops by 20-30 degrees C over the stock thermal paste with the use of any liquid metal TIM when applied properly. Note: it may be necessary to apply some liquid metal to the underside of the IHS. You can check this by placing the IHS on the CPU die (simply let it rest, no force required, no need to use any adhesive to re-attach either) and placing the CPU back in the socket on the motherboard. You then use the CPU retention mechanism to hold it in place. Remove the CPU from the socket and the lid from the CPU to check the contact of the TIM. If you don't see a nice even splotch of TIM on the underside of the IHS go ahead and apply a thin layer of TIM to the underside of the IHS and then reinstall the CPU in the socket as described above.

Is your computer experiencing Blue screen errors? Download BlueScreenView and post a screenshot of the error.
BSODs related to overclocking and their solutions can be found in this thread @ Xtremesystems.
Intel desktop CPU de-lidding tutorial: right here at Avsim

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One side of the IHS came off the CPU bracket. :Thinking:

 

I've reset it and doing a quick IBT. Current temps are low 70s with some spikes into the 80s so far. Keeping my fingers crossed.


Bert dela Merced

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I have de-liddet my CPU since a few hours...

And wow, my temps are around 20C° lower... (before I deliddet around 80C° and now around 60C° - all temps at stock clock)

Thank you!!!


regards Patrick

NAX3301.png

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Is this coolaboratory a solder? is it a permanently fixed?

 

i read that this should also be used between hsf and the ihs, so surely it cant "weld" itself.

 

Paul


Paul Westcott

 

pmdg_trijet.jpg

flight1.jpg

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how do you re-secure the lid again?

 

you can experiment... trying something like Permatex silicone adhesive

 

or you can just let it slide around (a bit) until securing with the cpu retention bracket

 

You really don't want a certain thickness (as far as I can tell from reading)... it seems the big problem is not the paste, but the gap between the cpu and IHS. More paste = more heat.

 

One side of the IHS came off the CPU bracket.

 

While gently securing the cpu bracket... I used a plastic razor blade. Could use a (clean) popsicle stick or toothpick

 

Is this coolaboratory a solder? is it a permanently fixed?

 

no and no.

 

There's youtube vid of it (appying)... very easy but you need very little. The BimmerCop has describe how tiny the amounts somewhere in this forum.

 

i read that this should also be used between hsf and the ihs, so surely it cant "weld" itself.

 

Dunno if "should" is correct. BimmerCop did and was happy with the results. It can stain the surfaces (if you have to pull apart for some reason) but I don't think that affects temps (much anyway). Most of it seems to come off when needing to reapply (i am referring to the cpu / ihs as I used a Timtronics tim btwn the ihs and hsf).

 

Note: it may be necessary to apply some liquid metal to the underside of the IHS.

 

Yeah after doing the cpu with a minimum amount to cover... I think this a good idea... again using a tiny amount just to paint the surface contact area. It should all be brushed on... no standing "puddles" imo.

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Thanks as ever rob.

I just seen a vid on y/t, of it being applied, - it may have been coolaboratory themselves.

 

 

Paul


Paul Westcott

 

pmdg_trijet.jpg

flight1.jpg

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Thank you TechguyMaxC,

did it with Coolaboratory, now I wish that my MSI Z77A G43 would give me more V´s, I could go higher than 4.8 Ghz (HT off) !

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