Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
captain420

How to set up basic flight plan on Garmin GNS 530?

Recommended Posts

I know how to setup flight plans on FMC on Boeings, does it work the same way on the Garmin GNS 530? For planes like the realair lancair legacy, can I program it to land on ILS runways, so that it can autoland and intercept the loc and gs? I'm not sure if these planes equipped with the 530 can use CATIII runways to autoland. Which method do I use or rather what instrument approach chart do I refer to when flying these planes? RNAV GPS, VOR, ILS, etc?

 

I'd appreciate if someone can help me create a simple flight plan from Honolulu (PHNL) to Dillingham Airfield (PHDH) using the GNS 530. 


ASUS ROG Maximus Hero XII ▪︎ Intel i9-10900K ▪︎ NVIDIA RTX 3090 FE ▪︎ 64GB Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro ▪︎ Windows 10 Pro (21H1) ▪︎ Samsung 970 EVO Pro 1TB NVME SSD (OS Drive) ▪︎ Samsung 860 EVO 2TB SATA SSD ▪︎ Seagate 4TB SATA HDD ▪︎ Corsair RMx 850W PSU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before I can help you, are you using a 530 which is based off the default, or an aftermarket addon such as the RealityXP 530W?

 

... and autoland has nothing to do with the GPS unit fitted in the aircraft. The aircraft itself must be fitted with autoland(completely independent of any GPS/navigation system), and provided it has this all it needs is dual ils receivers and a few other redundancy systems to make it meet the requirements of the regulators.


Regards,
James White

 

Aerosoft (Airbus X Extended/Twin Otter Extended/PFPX) & Majestic Q400 Beta Team
blueaerosofta320extbeta.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am using an aftermarket RealityXP unit. 


ASUS ROG Maximus Hero XII ▪︎ Intel i9-10900K ▪︎ NVIDIA RTX 3090 FE ▪︎ 64GB Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro ▪︎ Windows 10 Pro (21H1) ▪︎ Samsung 970 EVO Pro 1TB NVME SSD (OS Drive) ▪︎ Samsung 860 EVO 2TB SATA SSD ▪︎ Seagate 4TB SATA HDD ▪︎ Corsair RMx 850W PSU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Autoland?....no

 

In the flight plan page, enter the ICAO code of the departure airport, then add in the corresponding fixes of your flight plan, note here that there is not airway entry like the FMS that your used too. Then the last airport you put in will be your destination.

 

Cheers

 

Lee


 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought the reality XP 530 recently.  There is a comprehensive manual (read the real thing - manual) available as part of the install and it explains everything in pain staking detail.


Bryan Wallis aka "fltsimguy"

Maple Bay, British Columbia

Near CAM3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And an excellent You Tube video (from Garmin themselves I think) - well worth watching.


UK P3DV5 and Xplane 11 Simmer
PilotEdge I11, CAT11, A-Z (ZLA), A-Z (WUS)

System details: Gigabyte P57v7 CF2 17.3" laptop. Kaby Lake i7 7700HQ CPU (averaging 3.4mhz). NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 8mb (laptop version), 16 GB of DDR4-2400 RAM, SSD - Samsung 970 Evo  500GB M.2 NVMe, 1TB HDD 7200.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep and select PROC to add STARS and SIDS.

 

Reference the airway stuff - yes you manually have to enter a route. Check out skyvector.com and see where the airway bends and just put those points in your flight plan.


| FAA ZMP |
| PPL ASEL |
| Windows 11 | MSI Z690 Tomahawk | 12700K 4.7GHz | MSI RTX 4080 | 32GB 5600 MHz DDR5 | 500GB Samsung 860 Evo SSD | 2x 2TB Samsung 970 Evo M.2 | EVGA 850W Gold | Corsair 5000X | HP G2 (VR) / LG 27" 1440p |

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay I've watched several videos on youtube. Now a few questions regarding approaches. Which is the most automated type: GPS, LOC or VOR? I'm assuming it goes in this order from most automated to least:

 

1) GPS

2) LOC

3) VOR

 

Will all these approach type take my plane down to the runway automatically or do I have to manually control it?


ASUS ROG Maximus Hero XII ▪︎ Intel i9-10900K ▪︎ NVIDIA RTX 3090 FE ▪︎ 64GB Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro ▪︎ Windows 10 Pro (21H1) ▪︎ Samsung 970 EVO Pro 1TB NVME SSD (OS Drive) ▪︎ Samsung 860 EVO 2TB SATA SSD ▪︎ Seagate 4TB SATA HDD ▪︎ Corsair RMx 850W PSU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can allow it to fly you to MDA then you will need to take over. There is no glideslope with localizer or vor so you must step down manually.

 

Those you listed are non-precision approaches which means no autoland. Only a CAT 2 or 3 can fly you down to the runway.


Sean Green

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Only a CAT 2 or 3 can fly you down to the runway.

 

And only if you have an airplane that's capable of doing those kind of landings. Usually planes in which you can fit a GNS530 aren't. ^_^

 

BTW Not all GPS approaches will take you to MDA (or DH) because not all of those approaches come with vertical guidance! But also not all GPS approaches are non-precision! So Aaron would first have to check what kind of approach it is before he selects it!

 

EDIT

I think the list should look something like this (in order from most automated to least). Please feel free to correct me because those GPS approaches (officially called RNAV) are still confusing me a little (also because afaik Garmin has its own naming...)

 

ILS (precision approach: localizer plus glideslope)

EDIT Type of ILS approaches from most precision to least precision: CAT III C - CAT III B - CAT III A - CAT II - CAT I)

 

LPV (precision approach: lateral and vertical guidance) EDIT officially non-precision

LNAV/VNAV (or L/VNAV) (precision approach: lateral and vertical guidance) EDIT officially non-precision

LNAV+V (non-precision approach: lateral and advisory vertical guidance)

LNAV (non-precision approach: only lateral guidance)

 

LOC (non-precision approach: only lateral guidance)

 

VOR (non-precision approach: only lateral guidance towards the runway, not necessarily in line with it)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are all non precision approaches - none will allow auto land. Even though some RNAV (GPS) approaches have 200 ft minimums (similar to CAT1 ILS), they are still considered non precision approaches.

 

ILS cat 3 is auto land from what I know. An ILS approach is a precision approach.

 

Google navigation tutorial there's a few good links out there.

 

Here's one : http://www.navfltsm.addr.com/


| FAA ZMP |
| PPL ASEL |
| Windows 11 | MSI Z690 Tomahawk | 12700K 4.7GHz | MSI RTX 4080 | 32GB 5600 MHz DDR5 | 500GB Samsung 860 Evo SSD | 2x 2TB Samsung 970 Evo M.2 | EVGA 850W Gold | Corsair 5000X | HP G2 (VR) / LG 27" 1440p |

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a Major Difference between ILS and Autoland.

 

The ILS will guide your plane, on the Glideslope and the Localizer to the runway, and if you do not take over before the runway, it will slam you into the runway, at your 3 deg decent angle, with no flare, no engine control, etc etc.

 

Autoland, is what it says. It will control the flare, the attitude during the flare, airspeed, etc etc... and actually perform an acceptable landing, onto the runway.

 

ie There is a lot more to AUTOLAND than just redundant ILS receivers in the plane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Even though some RNAV (GPS) approaches have 200 ft minimums (similar to CAT1 ILS), they are still considered non precision approaches.

 

Er... I think you are wrong there. LPV are definitely precision approaches. (I get confused a little when it comes to LNAV/VNAV though, although I do think they are also precision.)

 

EDIT

Did some more reading: it seems that although LPV can officially be flown and used as an precision approach, it officially, so on paper, isn't one. For some odd reason. Will probably be the same for LNAV/VNAV.

 

Anyway, that doesn't change the order of the approaches when it comes to precision, I think. I edited my previous post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It maybe among the pilot world (I still don't think it is...yet) it's definitely not in the air traffic world.

 

Honesty a lot of the older controllers don't even know about LPV minimums.

 

Good thing is you can fly waas with LPV guidance using RXP yay


| FAA ZMP |
| PPL ASEL |
| Windows 11 | MSI Z690 Tomahawk | 12700K 4.7GHz | MSI RTX 4080 | 32GB 5600 MHz DDR5 | 500GB Samsung 860 Evo SSD | 2x 2TB Samsung 970 Evo M.2 | EVGA 850W Gold | Corsair 5000X | HP G2 (VR) / LG 27" 1440p |

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Tom Allensworth,
    Founder of AVSIM Online


  • Flight Simulation's Premier Resource!

    AVSIM is a free service to the flight simulation community. AVSIM is staffed completely by volunteers and all funds donated to AVSIM go directly back to supporting the community. Your donation here helps to pay our bandwidth costs, emergency funding, and other general costs that crop up from time to time. Thank you for your support!

    Click here for more information and to see all donations year to date.
×
×
  • Create New...