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antonmorse

Flight Level 100 ?

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Hi,

I have been thoroughly enjoying Radar Contact, thanks to JD and everyone involved in its making and upkeep.

 

I have been practising my flying procedures by carrying out numerous flights in a default 737 between KLAS and KRNO, and have gradually progressed from scathing feedback to mostly 'excellent, you'll put fisdu out of business'.

 

However, I have just decided to test the B747-400 (with an addon freeware  virtual cockpit), from Farnborough to Manchester.

I have been given an initial altitude of FL60, and then as I switched to departure, I was given FL100 !

 

Can anyone please assist me as to why this would happen? I am not an expert, but I believe my 747 can only do FL41 to 45, and FL100 must be just about in orbit lol,

 

Anyway, I am now off to continue the flight, but will attempt to ask for a lower cruise alt.

 

regards

Keith

 

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FL100 doesn't exist, its equivalent to 10,000 feet at 29.92. The exception is if the transition altitude is FL100.

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FL100 doesn't exist, its equivalent to 10,000 feet at 29.92. The exception is if the transition altitude is FL100.

In that particular area of the UK the transition altitude is 6000ft.

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk, so my spelling maybe complete rubbish.

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Haha, thank you all, I said I was no expert !

So far I have only done 13000ft trips between Reno and Vegas, so Flight Level speak has not arisen,, now it makes sense thanks.

 

Sorry if this is another silly question, but another first was the 'QNH' announcement, is there a way to convert this (to millibars?) or do I just use the auto altimeter button?

 

Thanks all.

Keith

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FL100 doesn't exist, its equivalent to 10,000 feet at 29.92. The exception is if the transition altitude is FL100.

 

nonsense. FL100 exist as well as any other FL.

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Haha, thank you all, I said I was no expert !

So far I have only done 13000ft trips between Reno and Vegas, so Flight Level speak has not arisen,, now it makes sense thanks.

 

Sorry if this is another silly question, but another first was the 'QNH' announcement, is there a way to convert this (to millibars?) or do I just use the auto altimeter button?

 

Thanks all.

Keith

 

There are conversion tables and multipliers - so you better hit 'B'!!!   :lol:

 

nonsense. FL100 exist as well as any other FL.

 

Be gentle, he's U.S. American - TA 18.000 ft all around ...   :P

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Sorry if this is another silly question, but another first was the 'QNH' announcement, is there a way to convert this (to millibars?) or do I just use the auto altimeter button?

 

Keith,

 

Be aware that the Transition Level is different all over Europe and the UK. When you hear "QNH" in any advisory from ATC that means switch from STD pressure to local, or QNH as it's referred to and then dial in your new altitude. I would advise you not to press B or whatever the auto altimeter button is. That only works correctly in the US with an 18,000ft transition level.

 

Get used to switching from QNH to STD and back again using the correct controls on your aircraft panel. If you don't you'll get yelled at. :wink:

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Thanks for that information Ray,

I'm trying to use the correct methods so I will avoid using B, (I should say 'we', as I often have to ask my MultiCrewExp co-pilot to change some of the instrument settings or I can't keep up otherwise).

 

Thanks again to all,

Keith

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The RC controller page preflight shows several bits of information for your departure and arrival airports.

 

One item is the transition altitude for each if you wish to be aware of that preflight.

 

Regarding FLs, here is a brief summary:

 

An FL is altitude in feet divided by 100.

 

If RC commands a change in altitude by FL then set your altimeter to the standard pressure of 29.92 in. or 1013 mb. If RC commands a change in altitude in feet then set your altimeter to local QNH announced by the controller when the change out of an FL. It will be in inches or millibars depending on location. RC issues QNH (sea level referenced pressure) several times as needed as monitored from FS when not in the flight levels.

 

As Ray noted, forget the "B" key in FS as it is hard coded for the FAA standard of the transition altitude of 18,000 feet.

 

RC has a feature where a copilot's voice will announce as you need to change to standard or QNH pressure using the phrase "altimeter check".

 

Some advanced aircraft panels have a convenient switch to change from standard to baro pressure. I use this feature to preset the anticipated QNH once I am in the flight levels so I will be near the setting and not have to make a radical adjustment at the busy time during descent. On the PMDG and similar Boeing models of the 737NG and up I think clicking the center BARO button does it if I recall correctly. On the Boeing PFD there are two pressure readings. One is what you have set as QNH and the other is STD off or on. This allows the preset method I referred to. The Active Sky weather app I use if I load the flight plan will print out METARs for departure and arrival and that is what I use to estimate the arrival QNH. (I use archived weather for the departure time for the whole flight.)

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thanks ronzie.

until this conversation I had not even been aware that I could switch between the two. I now see in the B747 (default) that the standby dial in fact has both units displayed, so I have inserted it into a custom panel that is easier to see when adjusting.

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Hi All

 

I've always used the "B" key to set QNH without any problem (as I thought) It seems to set it correctly sat at the gate at EGLL and at 6000ft transition or have I got hold of the wrong end of the stick......?

 

Regards

 

Alan

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Hi All

 

I've always used the "B" key to set QNH without any problem (as I thought) It seems to set it correctly sat at the gate at EGLL and at 6000ft transition or have I got hold of the wrong end of the stick......?

 

Regards

 

Alan

 

The "B" key fails only when you are at or above the local transition altitude. At EGLL surface to 6,000 feet it will work. Above At and above 6,000 feet it will still set QNH where it should set standard pressure.

 

RC has a fixed table of transition altitudes by airport.

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Ahh got it! :rolleyes: Have to admit I always set standard on the switch

 

Thanks Ronzie

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FL100 doesn't exist, its equivalent to 10,000 feet at 29.92. The exception is if the transition altitude is FL100.

 

Typical American thinking! A TL of 18000 feet doesn't apply everywhere, especially in Europe. The TL at all the main London airports is 6000 feet.

 

Iain Smith

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