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MDF86

Learning resources for VFR/GA flying?

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Hi Guys

 

At the risk of opening myself up to ridicule, I have spent my entire FSX "career" flying IFR in airliners - learning to program the FMC, performing ILS approaches etc...and I've never been even slightly interested in flying small aircraft 'low and slow'.

 

Since discovering the world of ORBX I now want to start learning to do this very different type of flying to enjoy my surroundings, but I don't really know where to start!

 

I can get a 777 halfway round the world via an FMC but I would have no idea how to do a realistic flight in a Cessna with regards to flight planning, navigation, procedures etc!

 

This probably sounds very silly, like a grown man who has learned to jump before mastering walking :lol:

 

Can anyone point me in the direction of some useful resources?

 

Many thanks!

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Hi MDF86,

 

you're lacking the basics but can fly around the world in a 777, with the FMC doing all the work.....too easy...lol....

 

I can tell you that flying VFR is very rewarding as well, and a lot of fun too. Same thing goes for flying a Cessna certified for IFR flights, and planning your route.

 

I assume you know all about NDB and VOR navigation, triangulation, reading VFR charts, building by hand your own flight plan. If your answer is no, then start form here, the basics. If these are all well mastered, then just jump in a single prop aircraft, and start flying around with charts on your lap, or on a laptop nex to you. This "reverse learning process" is quite the norm, we see it all the time on IVAO, where a 777 pilot will refuse to fly a non published holding procedure because it is not in the FMC database. Or they can't track a specific QDM for an NDB, because they don't even know what it is.

 

So, it all depends on what you know and don't know. Useful resources: the basics lessons from Ron Machado in FSX at first will do. The best resource:study on your own, where you'll learn all there is to know, from the concept of max efficiency speed to the proper way to lean the mixture, or to test a magneto before take off, or the difference between a fixed and variable pitch propeller, and on and on...it is not uncommon to get lost in VFR, but if you know how to navigate, you'll find your way. As you see, there is no definite answer to your question, it all depends on how much you want to learn, and that requires some studying, and flying in VFR.

 

Enrico

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Enrico

 

You're not wrong, it is too easy! And that's the trouble. You can do that stuff having essentially skipped over all of the basics of flight, because as long as you can program the computer to do what you want, it will do it!

 

I blame my father. He took my brother and I to London Heathrow many times as children (back when you could actually get close to the aircraft without getting arrested!) and ever since then I was hooked on the big jets, so I had absolutely no interest in flying little aircraft whilst in the simulator!

 

Now I have matured with age and want to take things a bit slower, cruising around beautiful ORBX land, taking in the scenery with a cup of

coffee!

 

Previously I had no interest at all in flying the little aircraft but the more beautiful scenery I see being developed for FSX, the more I think I am totally missing out on a lot by only flying airliners at high altitudes.

 

So basically I would say my knowledge of the basics is very poor. But I am prepared to put in plenty of study and flying practice!

 

There is a book on Amazon "Flight Simulator X for Pilots : Real World Training" which looks excellent. It's a huge thick book which seems to cover all of the information you could possibly need. It's probably a little too in depth for my quite basic needs but seems like a good resource to get stuck into (lost in!).

 

And whilst there are GA flyers in my thread...does anyone have any recommendations for a good first payware GA aircraft for a beginner like me? I must admit I have been spoiled by the likes of PMDG and can't imagine the thought of using the default GA aircraft! The main priority for me is good quality visuals in the VC as well as good realistic flight dynamics. I was looking at the Carenado Cessna 172 which seems like a sensible choice for a beginner?

 

Thanks!

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And whilst there are GA flyers in my thread...does anyone have any recommendations for a good first payware GA aircraft for a beginner like me? I must admit I have been spoiled by the likes of PMDG and can't imagine the thought of using the default GA aircraft! The main priority for me is good quality visuals in the VC as well as good realistic flight dynamics. I was looking at the Carenado Cessna 172 which seems like a sensible choice for a beginner?

 

Thanks!

 

If you're looking for a single engine plane get the A2A C172 or PA-28 depending on whether you like high or low wing. If you prefer multi engine check out the RealAir Dukes.

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Obviously the A2A Cessna or Cherokee

Realair Scout/Decathlon (a little dated but very good comes with amphib version too)

Realair Legacy (very fast)

Baytower RV7

Carenado C337

Flight1 T182

Alabeo products

 

For learning consider pilotedge workshops (VFR near the bottom)

http://www.pilotedge.net/workshops

 

These are USA based

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There is a book on Amazon "Flight Simulator X for Pilots : Real World Training" which looks excellent.

 

Believe it or not, that is the very first book I read when I started with flight simulation, a few years ago. That could be a good start, although it is not what you need if you want to learn VFR, but it is decent when it comes to IFR radionavigation. From there, any good VFR book will do, you can get them on the internet, there are so many nowdays.

As for the aircraft, as some already suggested, go with the Cessna from A2A, or the Cherokee, again form A2A, which just came out. Low and slow especially now that we are approaching summer, is a very good alternative from the liners. There are also some very good add ons in photoreal, that you can enjoy while flying with a single prop.

 

Enrico

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I would also suggest that you take Rod Machado's flying lessons, which can be found in the FSX Learning Center. Some can be pretty boring, but you get a quite good understanding of how things are done, and why they work.

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I would also suggest that you take Rod Machado's flying lessons, which can be found in the FSX Learning Center. Some can be pretty boring, but you get a quite good understanding of how things are done, and why they work.

I have to agree and you already have it. As opposed to something you might think you need to understand VFR flying. Once you get through the lessons, you can concentrate on where you need more help.

 

As far as planes, I like Lionheart Creation's Avelina. It's a strange electric single prop, great for doing the low and slow with no engine noise to disturb the tranquility.

__

Jerry

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As others have mentioned, the A2A C-172 and Cherokee are excellent, they, along with the Aerosoft Kantana simulate full preflight/maintenance/aircraft ownership aspect of GA flying and are probably the most in depth.

 

A2A is kind of like the PMDG of the GA and Warbird field, especially if you are looking at it from a training point of view.

 

For a training in the pure basics of flight, the A2A J-3 is about as true to pure flight as you can find...just don't expect to go anywhere in a hurry lol.  

 

If you want speed and complexity, the A2A Civil P-51 is pretty much the fastest piston GA out there.  That plane will keep you on your toes.

 

Aerosoft has a lot of great in depth planes, they are generally a little more Euro-centric with their fleet, but still many excellent choices.

 

As Ryan mentioned, anything from RealAir is fantastic. a nice variety of aircraft performance levels from bush plane to warbird.  The Legacy is a great 'middle ground' aircraft.

 

The Baytower RV is a nice jack of all trades plane that does a lot of things well...STOL, X-country, aerobatics..etc.

 

Carenado and Alabeo stuff is very nice visually and many have good flight dynamics, they tend to lack system depth.

 

 

For flying resources, I frequently use www.skyvector.com for flight planning.  They have a global sectional/enroute chart network, a flight planner, links to weather, airport info, instrument approaches (US airports only)

 

I have a dual monitor set up so I frequently have skyvector's sectional or enroute chart up while I am flying.

 

Cheers

TJ

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