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ryanbatcund

Who's Still Running Sandy Bridge?

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Seems like a lot of people upgrade often. But I've still got my 2500K. Anyway my OC fails every so often and I have to notch down because it won't let me raise the vcore anymore.

 

I started at 4.4GHz and I'm at 4.2 now.

 

I'm wondering if this happens to anyone else after three years of Sandy Bridge?

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Rock solid 4.5ghz for 2.5 years. 

Simming constantly and a lot of gaming as well.  Thats on the 2600K with Asus P8P67pro Rev 3.1 board.  I`ve upgraded to a GTX770 and an SSD for the OS.  Never felt the need to upgrade yet :)

 

Doogie

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Yeah I knew I had a poor OCer when I bought it. I have had to run 44x multi with auto vcore (I know NOT recommended) for 2 years. I'm not positive but I fear after my son touched my case in last years Winter the static discharge started wrecking my components.

 

I was hoping to not change my case but I don't trust the 650D anymore.

 

Anyway I'm sure I'll have to drop the OC down again. I can definetly tell the difference between stock and 4.4 hehe. I was thinking that new 4790.. But not yet!

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2600k here, but very soft 4.3-4.4 overclock. I will probably upgrade to Haswell-E on the new X99 chipset.

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Yeah I knew I had a poor OCer when I bought it. I have had to run 44x multi with auto vcore (I know NOT recommended) for 2 years. I'm not positive but I fear after my son touched my case in last years Winter the static discharge started wrecking my components.

 

I was hoping to not change my case but I don't trust the 650D anymore.

 

Anyway I'm sure I'll have to drop the OC down again. I can definetly tell the difference between stock and 4.4 hehe. I was thinking that new 4790.. But not yet!

I doubt it was that. Over time CPU's degrade if above stock voltage which is why you want to set the voltage yourself  so you know what it is . For example at 4.5ghz my 4790k needs 1.14v to be stable Intel says anything over 1.3v will degrade a cpu. What happens when a CPU degrades is that it will need more voltage to be stable at the same clock speed and when you add more voltage the degradation happens that much faster till the CPU can't even hold stock clock speeds and is toast.

 

It goes like this not exact

CPU degradation

1.5V less than 1 year

1.4v 1- 2 years

1.3v  2-3 years

1.2V safe

1.1v safe.

When you get a new CPU try getting the vcore as low as you can there is no need to run prime95 for 24 hours to prove stability. I ran OCCT for 5 min and to me that was good enough and my system is very stable no BSODs and I've had the system running for about a month now.

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My i5 2500K is still going strong, I had it conservatively overlocked at 4.3 GHz with a very modest Vcore but I did a BIOS reset a while ago (didn't solve my problem, turns out the HDD I/O chip was a duffer) so at the moment I am running stock clock.

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When I built this SB rig it was my first build.  I was very new to overclocking and had no clue what I was doing.  I stuck it on an  auto overclock and TBH the results were the same as what  can get doing it manually. 

I have pushed it to 4.6 but I was not happy with the volts I was feeding through the chip.  The Auto tuning ASUS suite hit 4.5 so I just copied the numbers from there and added them manually to the BIOS.  Apart from having to re do them after a BIOS upgrade it has never missed a beat.

 

I will probably upgrade at the end of the year, keep the 770 and stick the ASUS board and SB chip into a home server at stock  clock.  It should be good for a few years yet ;)

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doog79 and I are running basically the same setup. I have a 2600K@ 4.6 GHZ. My major upgrade recently has been a GTX770 4GB video card. I've contemplated going to the latest and greatest CPU but most of what I read said the performance boost for flight sim won't justify the increase in cost. I'll stay with what's working until the 2600k gives up the ghost or something is produced that knocks my socks off.

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I was looking up Intel road maps - is that a Q4 2014 product?

 

Haswell-E maybe be out to "the masses" as soon as next month ... worst case will be sept/oct ... main hold up is the motherboard manufacturers and getting DDR4 RAM ready to roll.

 

I'm using a Sandy Bridge E  (3960X) without issue and I'm running some aggressive voltage.  I'd suggest you check your RAM specs and make sure you are providing the correct CPU VCCSA Voltage and have all the timings correctly set.

 

Cheers, Rob.

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2500k rock solid for 2.5 yrs at 4.6gz on air cooling. Asus z77 sabertooth mobo on mostly auto settings. OC using asus ai tool. Paired with evga gtx 770. Debating upgrading to ivy bridge. The sandy bridge runs cool.

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Ivybridge typically runs hotter than Sandybridge because of the smaller die size; it puts out the same heat across a smaller surface area.

 

Sandybridge was a very good architecture to overclock with, probably the most OC friendly in the last 10 years.

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Good to hear all!

About my voltage - if I set the exact vcore as it runs on auto it will BSOD ... Funny but this is the issue I run into. And it's without logic ...

A lot if guys (you) were able to go above 4.5 with ease - I tried all the OC help links at the time and simply put nothing would work. I've since settled at a high 1.32v for 4.2 ( used to be 4.4)

 

I also think I chose poorly on my mobo... it was only a average board....  it seems like a lot of guys spend 200-300 on boards... at the time I spent 160 on my P67A UD4 board.

 

I think I'd have to spend at least 1000 bucks to get a decent upgrade.

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1.14 volts to run your 4790 at 4.5 GHZ?  Must be a lot different than the Sandy Bridge, because I doubt that a Sandy Bridge will even run stock speeds on that kind of voltage.  My Sandy requires 1.47 to run at 4.8.  That's definitely not a 24/7 type of voltage, but I'm not worried one bit.  If the processor degrades in a year or two, which I doubt, given my usage patterns, then I'll just replace the chip, or I'll take that as a signal to go to Haswell or beyond.  No point in babying it.  Like a racehorse, when it can't run competitively anymore, you can always put it out to pasture, where it can live a long life as a non-overclocked and very useful office machine to surf the internet and do mundane computing tasks like Photoshop and Word.

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2600k here, OC'd to 4.3 for about 2 years, but also can get up to 5ghz with everything stable EXCEPT P3D, which seems to freeze on doing from fullscreen to windowed if I'm OC'd that high. Plus it probably kills the life of the CPU a bit.

 

I use a CoolerMaster Hyper 212 and a Coolmaster HAF case. Honestly the best cooling around.

 

The overclocking was done with ASUSs system on the P8P67_DELUXE, which is basically automatic.

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I was running my i5 2500k @ 4.3Ghz quite happily for nearly three years......until last Friday night. I suffered a motherboard and GPU failure, and decided to take the opportunity to purchase a completely new PC. However, I would have been quite happy to carry on using the Sandy Bridge system for another two years if that had not happened.

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Another 2500k OC to 4.5  basic coolmaster. Could easy go higher but just to hot n humid here in Thailand

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And another one: 2500k at 4.5 for more than two years. I also have a very basic motherboard (Gygabyte PA67 D3 B3) Cooled with Hyper 212 EVO. My first self-built rig. Only bummer is the combination of the Gygabyte MB and the Hyper cooler only allows for 2 ram modules. Still, right now I see no reason to change to something more "modern"

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With certain programs taking advantage of, or soon to take advantage of SLI and DX11, I see the Sandy Bridge remaining relavent for quite a while now.   There are some LGA1155 mobos that only allow a 16x/8x/ SLI configuration, but then there are some that have the Nividia NF200 chip that will allow 16x/16x/, so I think if you've got one of those, then you're definitely doing pretty good for a bit longer.

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haha .... you should ask me who is using motherboard older than sandybridge ..... I am....

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1.14 volts to run your 4790 at 4.5 GHZ? Must be a lot different than the Sandy Bridge, because I doubt that a Sandy Bridge will even run stock speeds on that kind of voltage. My Sandy requires 1.47 to run at 4.8.

 

That not what I have found. To get my 4790K stable 4.7 I have to use 1.309 VCC. but, chips vary.

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I'm still running my i7-2700K after close to 3 years.  Recently had to reduce to 4.8 GHz from 5.0 GHz due to occasional instability (was stable at 5.0 GHz until about 3 months ago).  I'm using an old AS Rock Fatality Performance P67 MB, which was inexpensive, but very stable and very easy to overclock.  In it's time, it was a solid MB for sandy bridge, at only$99 US. They have a turbo mode for 4.8 GHz in the BIOS that runs the i7-2700K very stable.  I let the MB manage core voltage automatically, which has worked extremely well (even better than manually setting the voltage), even when clocked to 5.0 GHz.

 

I'll be looking at either a Haswell-E or Devils Canyon upgrade later in the year once the GTX 800 series cards have been released.  Probably stick with an AS Rock MB, or ASUS.  I will likely move to P3D at the same time, so I may set up two video cards in SLI, if fully supported by P3D.

 

Gerald

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2500K still running like new at 5.0 on the original ASUS P8P67 Deluxe .....yeah, the SATA 3 ports are gone and have been for awhile, but I've made do without them.

 

I actually bought a Haswell kit several months ago ...it's still in the box.

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1.14 volts to run your 4790 at 4.5 GHZ?  Must be a lot different than the Sandy Bridge, because I doubt that a Sandy Bridge will even run stock speeds on that kind of voltage.  My Sandy requires 1.47 to run at 4.8.  That's definitely not a 24/7 type of voltage, but I'm not worried one bit.  If the processor degrades in a year or two, which I doubt, given my usage patterns, then I'll just replace the chip, or I'll take that as a signal to go to Haswell or beyond.  No point in babying it.  Like a racehorse, when it can't run competitively anymore, you can always put it out to pasture, where it can live a long life as a non-overclocked and very useful office machine to surf the internet and do mundane computing tasks like Photoshop and Word.

I think I won the silicon lottery as they call it with my chip but devils canyon seems to need a lot of voltage to get past 4.6ghz

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