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HamSammich

4K In P3Dv3 - It Kinda Rocks

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A huge thank you to Rob Ainscough and others for blazing the trail on this. They helped get me here.

 

I had been considering the move but wasn't sure the system could handle it. Having heard the pros and cons, and having briefly considered a 21:9 1440P setup, I took the 4K plunge:

 

BenQ 32" added to my X99 setup. 5820K running at 4.5GHz on Swiftech AIO. A GTX-980 ti. Windows 10. P3D 3.0, ORBX scenery and Majestic's Q400.

 

.02 FTFF

2048 or 4096 texture. 4X MSAA and 16X anisotropic.

An affinity mask leaving the first core and a logical on the second open.

Sliders mostly maxed, with the exception of cloud shadows and reflections

Cloud draw at 80. Cloud cover medium

 

Bottom line: KSFO in Flightbeam HD, Runway 28R, P3D's Fair Weather skies.

 

40FPS.

 

All I can say is wow, wow, wow! That and thanks for all the tips and trick I've picked up along the way.

 

Marshall

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Yeah... I can totally imagine it from the text description... :rolleyes:

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No SGSS in NVI? How's the AA looking on the 4K screen?

The higher the resolution the less AA you need because the pixels are smaller in most cases.

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The AA looks totally nice, and I'm a nitpicker. Fine at KSFO. My torture test is KMRY--the approach lights from the west and the small terminal details and distant marina, when sitting on 28L. Will try that out--as soon as my video finishes rendering.

 

Bear in mind that any detail, at some resolution, will produce aliasing. It's the nature of a sampled digital system--Shannon's Law.

 

However, as the previous poster said, increasing the resolution moves that limit (the sampling frequency) farther and farther out until, eventually, the eye cannot perceive it. This is not just computer displays, though: Just look at a telephone wire in the distance through a window-screen and you can get the same effect. It's a phenomenon of nature.

 

Marshall

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Interesting post! I thought about going 4K myself with a Samsung 48'' curved TV (UE48JU6550).

 

One question though: Does the higher resolution increase the simulated field of view? So do I see more "suround" then what I currently see in my 1920 x1080 setup?

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Cross check the tv output online ..some tv advertises 120hz but u dont get past 30hz..its ok with flight sim but if u plan to use it apart from flight sim it becomes a pain with mouse lag..even 980ti wont help there..this was my wxperience with vizio..i returned it back..a 4k monitor is a different thing as it would support display port 1.2..

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Interesting post! I thought about going 4K myself with a Samsung 48'' curved TV (UE48JU6550).

 

One question though: Does the higher resolution increase the simulated field of view? So do I see more "suround" then what I currently see in my 1920 x1080 setup?

Yes. That's the main reason to do it. The idea is to trade-off field-of-view and DPI. The smaller the 4K screen, the higher the DPI and smaller the gauges and markings are. The bigger the screen, the lower the DPI. However, because the pixel dimensions stay the same--1920x1080, 2560x1440, 3840x216 or whatever--the field-of-view does, too. IOW, 4K is always a wider FOV than 1440P or 1080P, regardless of the physical size of your monitor 

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I believe all Samsung Curved UHD 4K tv's support 60hz through high speed HDMI 2.0

 

My 78" when I got it a year a ago, didn't support 60hz, but a firmware update a few months later seemed to fix that.

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The higher the resolution the less AA you need because the pixels are smaller in most cases.

The higher the resolution the more taxing on the graphics card...

A little lower resolution + working AA looks almost the same at is much easier for the card.

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>>A little lower resolution + working AA looks almost the same at is much easier for the card.<<

 

True enough. What you give up, though, is horizontal and vertical field-of-view. I went 4K for that. The AA benefits, for me, were incidental, and in any case would disappear on a screen big enough to have an equivalent PPI to lower-res.

 

Everything's a tradeoff. Still. And probably, in the FS world, always.

 

Best,

 

Marshall 

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The higher the resolution the more taxing on the graphics card...

A little lower resolution + working AA looks almost the same at is much easier for the card.

 

But on the other hand running a modern flat panel display at any resolution other than the "native" often results in a blurry picture or a picture that is non symmetrical or has black bars to make it fit the display. 

 

Pick your poison. :)

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I'm using dsr to achieve 4k and now I dont have to use NI or in game AA and it looks great and I get really good performance even in bad weather

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I'm using dsr to achieve 4k and now I dont have to use NI or in game AA and it looks great and I get really good performance even in bad weather

 

What DSR setting will give u 4K, I've been messing around with AA all week and I've found nothing that looks good and works good. Cheers!

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Glad you are enjoying 4K Marshall.

 

Some information to consider for those thinking about going 4K:

 

1.  Make sure whatever 4K monitor you get looks as good at 30Hz as it does at 60Hz 

2.  AA is actually a filter ... the fewer filters used the better, as we move to 8K even less AA will be need with the goal of removing AA completely.  AA is often mistakenly suggested it "sharpens" the image ... it actually doesn't, if anything it will have a tendency to blur the image (even SGSS AA).

3.  DSR is another method of AA, your native resolution doesn't really change ... if 1080p is native then your monitor physically only has 1920 x 1080 pixels (light points) ... rendering of the image is done at higher resolutions but then down sampled to lower 1080p.  The benefit with DSR is that it allows you to have odd sized render resolutions, you don't have to stick to 2X, 4X which allows one have more control over performance impact.

 

By 2020 or sooner I think many of us will be sporting 8K monitors as the "norm".  8K is available today, but it's expensive and missing an infrastructure to make it a mass market item (8K cameras for example are still experimental but Sony and RDCC are making them).

 

Here is a YouTube video that is 8K: 

 

 

I can watch it in 8K but it's not going to look right, looks great in 4K.  It's a 4min clip and they compressed the HECK out of it to be only 740MB in 8K.

 

Future looks good for flight/globe simulators.

 

Cheers, Rob.

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