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bartgast

Advice on a new PC for Prepar3d V3

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Hi all,

 

I'm looking to buy a new PC to get a better simming experience using Prepar3d V3 and the usual add-ons (PMDG aircraft, OrbX scenery,REX Soft Clouds, Active sky Next and airport scenery). I am thinking of buying a PC with these specs:

 

Geforce GTX 750 TI GPU

I5 4690K CPU

8GB DDR3 RAM

500 GB Sata2 Harddisk

Gigabyte H81M Motherboard

550 Watt PSU

Cooler master 342 Case

 

(I'm not able to overclock because my dad doesn't allow it)

 

This is pretty much the limit of my budget (because I'm only 15). Do you think this is the best I can get for my budget or do I need to downgrade something to upgrade something else?

 

I hope you can help me.

 

Best wishes,

Bart

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Are you capable of building a PC from scratch? If so consider buying second hand components, you can purchases parts that were high end 18 months - 2 years ago that would stomp all over the specs of that new build you've listed.

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Are you capable of building a PC from scratch? If so consider buying second hand components, you can purchases parts that were high end 18 months - 2 years ago that would stomp all over the specs of that new build you've listed.

 

Yes I'm letting it to be build from scratch, the problem is that my dad won't allow me to build it myself. He wants it to be build by someone professional so I can't use second handed parts...

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The CPU is ok, although you really should be overclocking it. With a decent cooler overclocking is perfectly safe if you follow a reliable guide online (tell your dad to chill!!)

 

The only part that is not really up to scratch for P3D is the 750Ti; it's quite a low performance card with only 2Gb VRAM.

 

You will have to be realistic with your expectations of what performance you can achieve with this level of system; it will certainly run P3Dv3 but you will have to be careful with the extra visual options such as shadows, HDR and reflections as these push the GPU hard.

 

What is your total budget and where do you live? Perhaps somebody can find a better system for the money you have?

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The CPU is ok, although you really should be overclocking it. With a decent cooler overclocking is perfectly safe if you follow a reliable guide online (tell your dad to chill!!)

 

The only part that is not really up to scratch for P3D is the 750Ti; it's quite a low performance card with only 2Gb VRAM.

 

You will have to be realistic with your expectations of what performance you can achieve with this level of system; it will certainly run P3Dv3 but you will have to be careful with the extra visual options such as shadows, HDR and reflections as these push the GPU hard.

 

What is your total budget and where do you live? Perhaps somebody can find a better system for the money you have?

 

I live in the Netherlands and my budget is €750,-. Thanks for the advice, do you think I could get it running at 20+ fps with medium to high settings? (Not max)

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I live in the Netherlands and my budget is €750,-. Thanks for the advice, do you think I could get it running at 20+ fps with medium to high settings? (Not max)

Honestly with that gpu I don't think so. I would want a gtx670 gtx770 minimum.

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Honestly with that gpu I don't think so. I would want a gtx670 gtx770 minimum.

Do you think I could get a cheaper CPU and a somewhat better GPU?

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Do you think I could get a cheaper CPU and a somewhat better GPU?

 

Yes.

 

Even an old 2500k overclocked runs P3D great.

 

Gotta have a great GPU though, and the 750ti isn't it. If you were in the US, I'd say get a 970 4GB, as they are about the best bang for the buck card out there (you can get them used under $300 all day). But I'm not sure what those cost in Europe.

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Do you think I could get a cheaper CPU and a somewhat better GPU?

No I would stay with that cpu. Maybe upgrade your gpu down the road when budget allows. Or find an used gpu. Did u check out the classified section?

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No I would stay with that cpu. Maybe upgrade your gpu down the road when budget allows. Or find an used gpu. Did u check out the classified section?

Thanks, I didn't check there yet

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Honestly with that gpu I don't think so. I would want a gtx670 gtx770 minimum.

Did you mean a 970 with a 770 minimum? The 670 is a lesser card.

 

Do you think I could get a cheaper CPU and a somewhat better GPU?

It's a balancing game - too little CPU and the "good" GPU can bottleneck it. And vice versa.

 

When you say your Dad won't allow you to clock the cpu - is he talking about the built in Turbo mode that some cpui's have also?

 

The closer you can get to 4ghz, the better off you will be.

 

That said - *IF* you get your settings in a good balance with the system specs you have, you should be able to get a smooth 20fps.

 

I run my system at a smooth 20 and it's perfect - some people can't get it smooth at 20 and have to go higher. Whatever system you get, shoot for the LOWEST FPS you can get with a SMOOTH operation - that will free up your system a tad - no point using up resources chasing FPS if you are already smooth.

 

Vic

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Yes.

 

Even an old 2500k overclocked runs P3D great.

 

Gotta have a great GPU though, and the 750ti isn't it. If you were in the US, I'd say get a 970 4GB, as they are about the best bang for the buck card out there (you can get them used under $300 all day). But I'm not sure what those cost in Europe.

Thanks, I'll check it out

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Did you mean a 970 with a 770 minimum? The 670 is a lesser card.It's a balancing game - too little CPU and the "good" GPU can bottleneck it. And vice versa.When you say your Dad won't allow you to clock the cpu - is he talking about the built in Turbo mode that some cpui's have also?The closer you can get to 4ghz, the better off you will be.That said - *IF* you get your settings in a good balance with the system specs you have, you should be able to get a smooth 20fps.I run my system at a smooth 20 and it's perfect - some people can't get it smooth at 20 and have to go higher. Whatever system you get, shoot for the LOWEST FPS you can get with a SMOOTH operation - that will free up your system a tad - no point using up resources chasing FPS if you are already smooth.Vic

I meant the 670 or 770 minimum. I just upgraded from the 670 and it ran p3d good if u were easy on the AA and shadow settings.

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Did you mean a 970 with a 770 minimum? The 670 is a lesser card.It's a balancing game - too little CPU and the "good" GPU can bottleneck it. And vice versa.When you say your Dad won't allow you to clock the cpu - is he talking about the built in Turbo mode that some cpui's have also?The closer you can get to 4ghz, the better off you will be.That said - *IF* you get your settings in a good balance with the system specs you have, you should be able to get a smooth 20fps.I run my system at a smooth 20 and it's perfect - some people can't get it smooth at 20 and have to go higher. Whatever system you get, shoot for the LOWEST FPS you can get with a SMOOTH operation - that will free up your system a tad - no point using up resources chasing FPS if you are already smooth.Vic

Thanks for the reply,

 

He doesn't want me to change the settings in a way that it affects the hardware too much, which is a shame. Do you think I will be able to have add-on scenery running on it like FlyTampa or not?

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Your spec is similar to mine and you should be able to run P3D well enough with mid range settings. One thing in your favour is that LM consider performance to be a key consideration and have show it by making performance fixes in each release. It's not the case that you need more power as each new version come out like in the FS days. 3.1 runs better than v2 did for me and that's key as your machine does not give you any headroom.

 

Addons are a different matter and I don't think you can throw too many at it but i think your spec looks okay if you are on a budget.

 

I seen people with the latest and greatest PCs complaining about performance. It's all about what is acceptable to you. Have fun

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Your spec is similar to mine and you should be able to run P3D well enough with mid range settings. One thing in your favour is that LM consider performance to be a key consideration and have show it by making performance fixes in each release. It's not the case that you need more power as each new version come out like in the FS days. 3.1 runs better than v2 did for me and that's key as your machine does not give you any headroom.

Addons are a different matter and I don't think you can throw too many at it but i think your spec looks okay if you are on a budget.

I seen people with the latest and greatest PCs complaining about performance. It's all about what is acceptable to you. Have fun

Thank you for the wise words! :)

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Thanks for the reply,

 

He doesn't want me to change the settings in a way that it affects the hardware too much, which is a shame. Do you think I will be able to have add-on scenery running on it like FlyTampa or not?

If it's the 4690K it is easily overclockable within built in limits that would give you a boost but not harm your system. Pushing the boundaries is where you get into trouble.

 

With trade off settings you should be able to run most of the new stuff - possibly not all at the same time. For example, ruinning a PMDG aircraft over Fly Tampa scenery using ASN weather with 5 cloud layers in heavy TStorms with high AA would be a BIG problem. :) But with modest settings - you should be fine.

 

Vic

I meant the 670 or 770 minimum. I just upgraded from the 670 and it ran p3d good if u were easy on the AA and shadow settings.

ok, got confused - since he is going with a GTX750TI I didn't understand your recommending a 670 which is a significantly lesser card that the 750.

 

EDIT: I revisited the benchmarks and you are correct - the GTX670 outperforms the GTX750TI by a large margin!

 

 

 

Vic

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I wouldn't skimp on the GPU.

 

Even if you have to buy an old used 680, do that. 770 4GB is a good card as well and cheap used.

 

Anything under the -70 series of the different generations is not what you want (yes, I realize some make it work, but it's not ideal).

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If it's the 4690K it is easily overclockable within built in limits that would give you a boost but not harm your system. Pushing the boundaries is where you get into trouble.With trade off settings you should be able to run most of the new stuff - possibly not all at the same time. For example, ruinning a PMDG aircraft over Fly Tampa scenery using ASN weather with 5 cloud layers in heavy TStorms with high AA would be a BIG problem. :) But with modest settings - you should be fine.Vicok, got confused - since he is going with a GTX750TI I didn't understand your recommending a 670 which is a significantly lesser card that the 750.EDIT: I revisited the benchmarks and you are correct - the GTX670 outperforms the GTX750TI by a large margin!Vic

Thanks!

I wouldn't skimp on the GPU.

 

Even if you have to buy an old used 680, do that. 770 4GB is a good card as well and cheap used.

 

Anything under the -70 series of the different generations is not what you want (yes, I realize some make it work, but it's not ideal).

Thanks I will look into it!

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Overclocking with bclk is ofter unstable, at some point. However, not the case here with 4690K

 

I second what has been said, a reasonable OC on a -K series, only done with the internal multiplier, is totally safe.

Provided that you mount a good cooler (air or liquid, just get the higher-end stuff that you can afford, for example Noctua for air-based cooling).

Since you're not gonna build the machine yourself, your assembler is probably able to do that in a professional manner, and have it tested and proven totally safe.

 

Rememer that K CPUs (and to the extent, most modern CPUs) are purposedly _designed_ for OC.

OCing is not breaching any rules  (Apart Dad's own) :-)

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Overclocking with bclk is ofter unstable, at some point. However, not the case here with 4690K

 

I second what has been said, a reasonable OC on a -K series, only done with the internal multiplier, is totally safe.

Provided that you mount a good cooler (air or liquid, just get the higher-end stuff that you can afford, for example Noctua for air-based cooling).

Since you're not gonna build the machine yourself, your assembler is probably able to do that in a professional manner, and have it tested and proven totally safe.

 

Rememer that K CPUs (and to the extent, most modern CPUs) are purposedly _designed_ for OC.

OCing is not breaching any rules  (Apart Dad's own) :-)

Thanks for the answer,

 

I'm totally fine with OCing but, as you said, my dad isn't

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I have an ASrock motherboard. It has an "quick" overclocking ability where you literally just select a preset (it goes up to 4.6ghz for my 2500k, which is really high). I don't use it as it generally uses more voltage then it needs (which is still totally safe, but I did it manually to get the absolute lowest voltages and temps).

The point is, you don't have to set voltages, multipliers, deal with pci voltages, set step voltage, etc. and can do a light overclock with zero work or risk.

 

Just about every motherboard maker has the same functionality within the BIOS these days.

 

Maybe if you show your dad exactly what it entails, he'll change his mind. -K series processors are made to be overclocked and they all use speed step so they do not run at high clocks unless they are under load.

 

Either way, I use a $25 Coolermaster single fan cooler on my 2500k and run at 4.7ghz. No heat issues at all. You don't need liquid cooling unless you are going to go extremely toward the limits (which for a 2500k is about 5.0ghz).

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I have an ASrock motherboard. It has an "quick" overclocking ability where you literally just select a preset (it goes up to 4.6ghz for my 2500k, which is really high). I don't use it as it generally uses more voltage then it needs (which is still totally safe, but I did it manually to get the absolute lowest voltages and temps).

The point is, you don't have to set voltages, multipliers, deal with pci voltages, set step voltage, etc. and can do a light overclock with zero work or risk.

 

Just about every motherboard maker has the same functionality within the BIOS these days.

 

Maybe if you show your dad exactly what it entails, he'll change his mind. -K series processors are made to be overclocked and they all use speed step so they do not run at high clocks unless they are under load.

 

Either way, I use a $25 Coolermaster single fan cooler on my 2500k and run at 4.7ghz. No heat issues at all. You don't need liquid cooling unless you are going to go extremely toward the limits (which for a 2500k is about 5.0ghz).

Thanks, maybe this can convince my dad!

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Thanks, maybe this can convince my dad!

If he'd like to post his concerns, have him use your account and ask and we'll be glad to answer his questions.

 

The modern CPU's are DESIGNED to be overclocked and have a built in process to do so. Staying within the built in limits is no more dangerous than simply turning the computer on. Over clocking OUTSIDE of the built in speeds requires more care. I agree, if you're having a "pro" build it for you, he should be able to do a modest clock that will benefit you and not harm the system.

 

Vic

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If he'd like to post his concerns, have him use your account and ask and we'll be glad to answer his questions.The modern CPU's are DESIGNED to be overclocked and have a built in process to do so. Staying within the built in limits is no more dangerous than simply turning the computer on. Over clocking OUTSIDE of the built in speeds requires more care. I agree, if you're having a "pro" build it for you, he should be able to do a modest clock that will benefit you and not harm the system.Vic

Thanks I will ask him :)

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