Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ray Proudfoot

Does P3D need an HDR display to look its best?

Recommended Posts

HDR Lighting was a lifeline for me in P3D. I hated the "inside a supernova" brightness in broad daylight of FSX and standard lighting in P3D. In fact, it restricted me to short flights close to dawn or dusk, simply because I couldn't stand looking at the super bright landscape at any other time of the day. I now have the brightness in P3D v3.3.5 dialled back to only 0.40, and can finally start flying at other times of the day.

There are numerous areas of VFR Photographic Scenery England and Wales where the colours are rather over saturated, and these "stick out like a sore thumb" in broad daylight. However, they are much less obvious when the brightness is significantly reduced, and it makes a MASSIVE difference to my enjoyment of VFR flight.


Christopher Low

UK2000 Beta Tester

FSBetaTesters3.png

Share this post


Link to post

Christopher, I'm not seeing supernova brightness. Just normal. That's why I don't need HDR switching on.

What graphics card, monitor and cable connections do you use?


Ray (Cheshire, England).
System: P3D v5.3HF2 & v3.4, Intel i7-8086K o/c to 5.0Ghz, Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti 11Gb, Samsung 970 EVO M.2 SSD, 1Tb Samsung 860 EVO SSD, Asus Prime Z370-A mobo, 32Gb G.Skill DDR4 3000Mhz RAM, Win 10 Pro 64-bit, BenQ PD3200U 32” monitor, Fulcrum One yoke.
Cheadle Hulme Weather

Share this post


Link to post

2GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 770

24" 1920x1080 Asus VS247HR widescreen

DVI or HDMI (will need to check when I get home)


Christopher Low

UK2000 Beta Tester

FSBetaTesters3.png

Share this post


Link to post
8 minutes ago, Christopher Low said:

2GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 770

24" 1920x1080 Asus VS247HR widescreen

DVI or HDMI (will need to check when I get home)

Thanks. I wonder why I see such a different image to you?


Ray (Cheshire, England).
System: P3D v5.3HF2 & v3.4, Intel i7-8086K o/c to 5.0Ghz, Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti 11Gb, Samsung 970 EVO M.2 SSD, 1Tb Samsung 860 EVO SSD, Asus Prime Z370-A mobo, 32Gb G.Skill DDR4 3000Mhz RAM, Win 10 Pro 64-bit, BenQ PD3200U 32” monitor, Fulcrum One yoke.
Cheadle Hulme Weather

Share this post


Link to post

When I say "supernova" brightness, I am exaggerating to a certain extent. It is more probable that I just have a low tolerance for brightness levels. I am the kind of person who prefers a handful of lamps on in the living room rather than the bright main light in the centre, so that may be an indication of my requirements :smile:


Christopher Low

UK2000 Beta Tester

FSBetaTesters3.png

Share this post


Link to post

Understood Christopher. All my flying is done in daylight hours so that might explain why I prefer a brighter image. If you do yours in subdued light then HDR will probably be fine.


Ray (Cheshire, England).
System: P3D v5.3HF2 & v3.4, Intel i7-8086K o/c to 5.0Ghz, Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti 11Gb, Samsung 970 EVO M.2 SSD, 1Tb Samsung 860 EVO SSD, Asus Prime Z370-A mobo, 32Gb G.Skill DDR4 3000Mhz RAM, Win 10 Pro 64-bit, BenQ PD3200U 32” monitor, Fulcrum One yoke.
Cheadle Hulme Weather

Share this post


Link to post

I'm revisiting this topic because a lot has changed since my original post 22 months ago.

I now have a new system and a new monitor which replaced a Sony 32" Full HD TV. I've had to stay with P3D v3 for FSL Concorde until such time as a 64-bit version is released.

I decided to have another crack at HDR figuring L-M wouldn't have added it unless there were tangible benefits. I still have more tweaking to do but overall it does add another dimension to the lighting effects. I need to check some tutorials on YT to get the best out of it.

Needless to say when I load up P3D v4 I'll certainly be turning it on. I can only assume the graphics card and especially the monitor play a major part in making it look good. My Sony TV clearly wasn't up to the task.

It's all the more impressive when I'm having to run a UHD monitor at 1920*1080 too. With the extra contrast it does help give the gauges that extra clarity.


Ray (Cheshire, England).
System: P3D v5.3HF2 & v3.4, Intel i7-8086K o/c to 5.0Ghz, Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti 11Gb, Samsung 970 EVO M.2 SSD, 1Tb Samsung 860 EVO SSD, Asus Prime Z370-A mobo, 32Gb G.Skill DDR4 3000Mhz RAM, Win 10 Pro 64-bit, BenQ PD3200U 32” monitor, Fulcrum One yoke.
Cheadle Hulme Weather

Share this post


Link to post
On 4/20/2017 at 2:04 PM, Ray Proudfoot said:

Thanks Jim. It is mighty confusing they're using the same naming convention as genuine HDR.

Perhaps a discussion as to what HDR is is warranted.  HDR means high dynamic range. All it means is that unlike regular photography, HDR photography can show detail in dark and light areas simultaneously. If you've ever taken pictures with a regular camera you know you have to choose what you're exposing the picture for - the shadows or the light areas. And whichever you choose, the other one isn't going to be as visible.

HDR purports to eliminate that issue by sampling at multiple exposure levels simultaneously.

So you don't need an "HDR monitor" to display HDR photography, because if your monitor can display this photo:

 

low-light-photography-570x379.jpg

 

and also display this photo:

 

telephoto-aperture-priority.png

 

then it's capable of the dynamic range you need - all it needs is to get HDR imagery.

 

In the old days some LCD monitors had poor dynamic range because they were backlit by a couple of fluorescent bulbs and had to do all of the contrast work by darkening pixels, which was only partly successful. So you'd, for instance, have a picture where anything that should have been black was actually grey. But these days the backlighting is much more discrete and so really, almost all of them can display an HDR image.

 

As evidence, if this picture looks good:

 

arch-landscape.jpg

 

then your monitor can already display HDR imagery (a normally-exposed photo would either show the sunlight properly while the arch would be dark, or it would show the arch properly while the sunlight would be blown out).

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
10 minutes ago, eslader said:

Perhaps a discussion as to what HDR is is warranted.  HDR means high dynamic range. All it means is that unlike regular photography, HDR photography can show detail in dark and light areas simultaneously. If you've ever taken pictures with a regular camera you know you have to choose what you're exposing the picture for - the shadows or the light areas. And whichever you choose, the other one isn't going to be as visible.

HDR purports to eliminate that issue by sampling at multiple exposure levels simultaneously.

So you don't need an "HDR monitor" to display HDR photography, because if your monitor can display this photo:

Thanks Charles. I had discovered that HDR in P3D is quite different to HDR when applied to TVs.

What HDR in P3D is giving me is far greater brightness where the sun is shining into the cockpit. Just as in real life I guess. And the better the monitor the better the results. It definitely gives a more lifelike image. Whether the same applies at night is immaterial to me as I rarely fly after dark.


Ray (Cheshire, England).
System: P3D v5.3HF2 & v3.4, Intel i7-8086K o/c to 5.0Ghz, Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti 11Gb, Samsung 970 EVO M.2 SSD, 1Tb Samsung 860 EVO SSD, Asus Prime Z370-A mobo, 32Gb G.Skill DDR4 3000Mhz RAM, Win 10 Pro 64-bit, BenQ PD3200U 32” monitor, Fulcrum One yoke.
Cheadle Hulme Weather

Share this post


Link to post

From what I think I understand that HDR in P3D is not the same as HDR on a TV or monitor. Its like a placebo effect that P3D uses to its graphic engine to give you more color control.


CPU: Intel i9-11900K @5.2 / RAM: 32GB DDR4 3200 / GPU: 3080 10GB /

Share this post


Link to post
1 minute ago, FreeBird(Josh) said:

From what I think I understand that HDR in P3D is not the same as HDR on a TV or monitor. Its like a placebo effect that P3D uses to its graphic engine to give you more color control.

I agree it's different. It's not just colour control though. It's changing the brightness levels in an intelligent way. Things in sunshine are brighter than shade by a greater degree than without HDR enabled.

And it's not a placebo effect. You can see the difference. :wink:

 


Ray (Cheshire, England).
System: P3D v5.3HF2 & v3.4, Intel i7-8086K o/c to 5.0Ghz, Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti 11Gb, Samsung 970 EVO M.2 SSD, 1Tb Samsung 860 EVO SSD, Asus Prime Z370-A mobo, 32Gb G.Skill DDR4 3000Mhz RAM, Win 10 Pro 64-bit, BenQ PD3200U 32” monitor, Fulcrum One yoke.
Cheadle Hulme Weather

Share this post


Link to post
30 minutes ago, Ray Proudfoot said:

I agree it's different. It's not just colour control though. It's changing the brightness levels in an intelligent way. Things in sunshine are brighter than shade by a greater degree than without HDR enabled.

And it's not a placebo effect. You can see the difference. :wink:

 

I used the wrong words. What you said is a better description.

  • Upvote 1

CPU: Intel i9-11900K @5.2 / RAM: 32GB DDR4 3200 / GPU: 3080 10GB /

Share this post


Link to post

From what I can tell it's a somewhat clunky brightness/contrast boost. This is, I suspect, why if you have back-lit buttons in the cockpit, the text on them can appear blurry, where if you turn HDR off it does not.

Share this post


Link to post

Love the HDR in P3D.

I think it does help if your monitor/TV can make full use of it though.

Got my settings dialled in just right for my 65" Sony 4K


MSFS & XP11 - Aviatek G1000 Complex Desktop Trainer - Fulcrum One Yoke - TPR Rudder Pedals - VF TQ6 Throttle - LG 55" OLED Display

Share this post


Link to post

While the HDR on my 55" 4k Sony tv shows an improvement in contrast/lighting over my 38" Dell I wouldn't say it was earth shattering in P3D.

Now if your talking movies, The Sony 4k is the way to go. The X1 processor allows for fast motion with ZERO motion blur, like a plasma. You will never look at a samsung again without grinning. In the end the 55" was too big for a computer monitor and I chose the 38". I still stand by that choice, but I was surprised the 38 was not a brighter display w/ HDR. especially at the price point it was at. But give it a few years.

 


Flight Simulator's - Prepar3d V5.3/MSFS2020 | Operating System - WIN 10 | Main Board - GIGABYTE Z390 AORUS PRO | CPU - INTEL 9700k (5.0Ghz) | RAM - VIPER 32Gig DDR4 4000Mhz | Video Card - EVGA RTX3090 FTW3 ULTRA Monitor - DELL 38" ULTRAWIDE | Case - CORSAIR 750D FULL TOWER | CPU Cooling - CORSAIR H150i Elite Push/Pull | Power Supply - EVGA 1000 G+ 

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
  • Tom Allensworth,
    Founder of AVSIM Online


  • Flight Simulation's Premier Resource!

    AVSIM is a free service to the flight simulation community. AVSIM is staffed completely by volunteers and all funds donated to AVSIM go directly back to supporting the community. Your donation here helps to pay our bandwidth costs, emergency funding, and other general costs that crop up from time to time. Thank you for your support!

    Click here for more information and to see all donations year to date.
×
×
  • Create New...