Sign in to follow this  
BobK

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Daytona Wiped Out!

Recommended Posts

This is enough to make me cry... :'( :'( :'( :'(Here are pictures of the ERAU-DAY planes. Forty aircraft weredestroyed, and $50 million in damage was done to them and otherproperty during the 12/24/06 tornadoes. Unbelievable! :-eekThis sure isn't going to help insurance rates... ;( http://img176.imageshack.us/img176/9047/erau1jz2.jpghttp://img237.imageshack.us/img237/2941/erau2he8.jpghttp://img237.imageshack.us/img237/5210/erau3pl8.jpghttp://img216.imageshack.us/img216/4271/erau4un6.jpghttp://img142.imageshack.us/img142/1408/erau5jm6.jpghttp://img167.imageshack.us/img167/8361/erau6ay6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

Ouch. Lets hope they were well insured. Hope no one was hurt.

Share this post


Link to post

I always wonder why pilots when then know abut incoming storm simply fly those planes hundreds of miles away to safer locations. The nature of storms is that they are relatively slow moving and the worst that could happen is that you flew those planes unnecessarily. Current weather forecasts are not yet absolutely perfect but they are good enough to see that probablity of damage might be high enough and warrant a simple 'escape' tactic. Perhpas insurance companies should start questioning pilot-owners whether they even lifted a finger to save their aircraft.Embry Riddle could have offered their student pilots free 'repositioning' flights.Michael J.

Share this post


Link to post

Having lived in the Midwest and lived thru several tornados, and also having been in a Florida tornado, if I were to move my plane every time a threat came near I'd go broke. Tornadic storms aren't easy to predict and can be very fast moving--one moved through North Platte NE back in '75 abreast a squall line that moved through at 40 kts with clear air ahead of it. I was caught outside in another F1 twister in '80, and the reason I was caught is five minutes before, not a cloud in the sky. The atmosphere just exploded in an unpredicted event of instability. The F1 twister was strong enough to topple 50 foot pine trees and tear off metal roofs and would have destroyed any plane it came across. And it developed and vanished so quickly, the NWS couldn't confirm it by radar--only those of us caught in it could testify it hit. I was digging dust out of my hair and skin for days afterwards.I agree that storms such as hurricanes which can be tracked and with a certain outcome--get the aircraft out. But fronts come through Florida all the time, any one of which might set up conditions for a Tornado, or might not. That's one area of weather prediction we still haven't gotten to a science.-John

Share this post


Link to post

John,Thanks for the insights. I actually am a westerner and have little real life experience with hurricanes, tornados, twisters, etc. More with the earthquakes ;)Michael J.

Share this post


Link to post

I wonder if anyone living in the area would have a chance to buy one of the cockpits from the insurance company? And, if they did, whether their better half would allow it in the rumpus room? ;)

Share this post


Link to post

Wow, breaks my heart, I've learned to fly just next door (Delta Aviation Academy in Sanford, FL). I wonder why they didn't fly them to safer grounds?! Anytime we had anticipated bad weather all flight instructors had to line up to fly North, the whole fleet.Cheers,Petehttp://members.aol.com/pzsoulman/myhomepage/logo.gifGIGABYTE Light 3D Galaxy II Liquid CoolingENERMAX Galaxy EGA850EWL ATX 850W Power SupplyNVIDIA nForce 680i SLI ATX Intel MoboCore 2 Duo E6700 1066MHz FSB 4M shared L2 Cache LGA 775CORSAIR XMS2 2GB SDRAM DDR2 800GeForce 8800GTX 768MB 384-bit GDDR3 PCI ExpressSBlaster X-Fi XtremeMusic 7.12 x Western Digital Raptor 150GB 10000 RPM 16MB Cache SATA Raid01 Seagate Barracuda 320GB 7200RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/sWinXP Home SP2CH Yoke/Pedals

Share this post


Link to post

It was winter break at the school so it would be difficult to gather up enough pilots to ferry 50+ airplanes hundreds of miles in a few hours.

Share this post


Link to post

It was a TORNADO, not a hurricane. A tornado gives you what, 15, 20 minutes to prepare? Even if all the students and instructors were on campus, it would take more than a few HOURS to organize the pilots, pre-flight the airplanes, start up, taxi out and take off. How any of you can say that they should have flown the airplanes to safety is beyond me. In all reality, the airplanes were in the safest place they could be under the circumstances; tied down, with no pilots flying them. This was a MAJOR storm system, extending hundreds of miles to the north and south of the airport. If any of them had taken off, chances are pretty good that one, if not more, would have crashed in the storm. I'd rather have 50 mangled airplanes on the ramp than 1 crashed airplane and 1 dead instructor. Watch the video on www.wesh.com and pay close attention to the part that the guy talks about how hurricanes compare to tornadoes.

Share this post


Link to post

If you are interested in an old cockpit - google for "Air Salvage"There are many companies in the business and probably one near you.Your biggest cost will be that the metal scrap value might be higher than you are willing to pay, but air salvage folks are mostly pilots and aviation enthusiasts like us flight simmers - and understand the joys of flight.One large company at KLNC has been very supportive when I've talked with them about obtaining a cocipit.However the second half of the question above is currently a major obstacle.

Share this post


Link to post

Yeah that is what I was wondering too. All the aviation sites I visit say they could've easily flown them to safety. What are these people thinking? At the most I think the warning would be a hook echo from the radar and I think that is only 30 minutes before the storm. I don't know how Embry-Riddle checks out their airplanes to their students but at the college I am at it would take forever to get everyone preflighted and out of the runup area and into the air. Plus even if you are going to have everyone already in the airplanes and running are you really going to launch an inexperienced pilot (1000 hours and less) into a system that has tornadic activity?

Share this post


Link to post

ERAU isn't exactly liked where I go to school because they were very cocky and what not at nationals last year. I wasn't there, but from what I was told they weren't the friendliest people. However, this is really a terrible thing and I hope all Riddle students and faculty are okay and things recover soon.

Share this post


Link to post

>Yeah that is what I was wondering too. All the aviation sites>I visit say they could've easily flown them to safety. What>are these people thinking? At the most I think the warning>would be a hook echo from the radar and I think that is only>30 minutes before the storm. I don't know how Embry-Riddle>checks out their airplanes to their students but at the>college I am at it would take forever to get everyone>preflighted and out of the runup area and into the air. Plus>even if you are going to have everyone already in the>airplanes and running are you really going to launch an>inexperienced pilot (1000 hours and less) into a system that>has tornadic activity?You don't consider someone experienced enough until 1000 hours? Here I am wondering if I will ever get to 40 hours :)

Share this post


Link to post

>Wow, breaks my heart, I've learned to fly just next door>(Delta Aviation Academy in Sanford, FL). I wonder why they>didn't fly them to safer grounds?! >>Anytime we had anticipated bad weather all flight instructors>had to line up to fly North, the whole fleet.>Sure, if you have a wide-area storm like a hurricane coming. But those tornados can form in 5 minutes, and really there's no defense against them.I guess that's the best reason to carry insurance. Hope rates don't go up for other aircraft owners.RhettAMD 3700+ (@2530 mhz), eVGA 7800GT 256 (Guru3D 93.71), ASUS A8N-E, PC Power 510 SLI, 2 GB Corsair XMS 3-3-3-8, WD 250 gig 7200 rpm SATA2, CoolerMaster Praetorian

Share this post


Link to post

>You don't consider someone experienced enough until 1000>hours? Here I am wondering if I will ever get to 40 hours :)Not experienced enough to fly into a storm that has the energy to produce this large of a tornado.

Share this post


Link to post

Having lived in west central Alabama for a number of years prior to moving to Florida, I can vouch for the lack of warning a tornado gives. The only thing certain during tornado season is that the threat exists every day. I've been in high school when the entire roof departed the building, complete with a bus spinning in the air, I've been under a spawning tornado that dropped a hundred foot interstate service station sign like a wet dishrag and scattered debris from an obliterated Holiday Inn from Tuscaloosa to Birmingham. We've lost acquaintances in tornadoes - I even had an old CFI of mine hit directly on final with a student and thrown into a hangar roof (which they somehow survived)- just to mention a few. At the beginning of each season we even had a week of tornado awareness training at the U of A. You are completely defenseless against the wrath of a tornado, aside from taking whatever shelter you have.However, as stated above hurricanes are a different critter all together. If and when reasonable threat of a hit in central Florida is identified I fly mine back up to my Dad's place in Alabama - which is generally past the worst of tornado season. Incidentally, that paid off the first time I vacated Lakeland as we took the eye of - I think it was Jean - which pushed in our hangar doors. Ironically, I had taken it up there at the threat of Ivan, which then by-passed us and drew a line on our place up there (all was well though). I'll leave it there usually until the season wanes and then retrieve it.As an interesting note - try showing up at the airline counter having purchased a one-way ticket a couple of hours prior with a flight-bag carrying enough stuff to fly their airplane just about anywhere in the continental US. Then try explaining how you had just flown a plane out of harm's way etc., etc., - then you head on over to the guys behind the screen for the secondary body search.Regards,Leon

Share this post


Link to post

Great post, very informative for some of us who don't live in the 'tornado alley'.Michael J.

Share this post


Link to post

Thanks Michael,When we moved to Florida we thought we'd left the tornados behind, but as we've seen over the last decade or so even here we're at risk. Ironically, a few years back we took a hit from a smaller one here in Lakeland that peeled about half of our shingles off and carried the kid's trampoline a few yards down. It was time for a roof anyway.Welcome back, by the way. I haven't seen you post in a while.Regards,Leon

Share this post


Link to post

Even up here in Washington State we are not out of the dangers of tornadoes. We had a crazy one develop the first week of flying this year. Luckily it was at the far west end of one of the practice areas and no one was close enough to be bothered by it.

Share this post


Link to post

I bet it dosn't break the heart of Embry-Riddle. They'be probably been developing a strategy for a while for replacing their older analog gauge trainers with the new glass cockpit trainers that Diamond and others are building and now they have an instant solution to what was going to be a long and costly process. You can be sure there are a lot of smiles in the Embry-Riddle boardroom. billg

Share this post


Link to post

>I bet it dosn't break the heart of Embry-Riddle. They'be>probably been developing a strategy for a while for replacing>their older analog gauge trainers with the new glass cockpit>trainers that Diamond and others are building and now they>have an instant solution to what was going to be a long and>costly process. You can be sure there are a lot of smiles in>the Embry-Riddle boardroom. Perhaps so... although, checking the ownership of the a/c shown in the pictures shows that they are - without exception - owned by a leasing company. Depending on the terms of the long-term lease agreement, getting rid of the "steam fleet" might not have been all that expensive a process...

Share this post


Link to post

I don't know how they do it at E-R but it is way too easy to practice instrument flight in a glass cockpit. So most flight schools keep the steam gauges for instrument training.

Share this post


Link to post

>it is way too easy to>practice instrument flight in a glass cockpit.Sorry, I don't buy it. Glass cockpit has proven to be 'easy' for some and 'difficult' for other. I don't see this easy-difficult being any factor in whether a flight schools adopts a glass or none. Most flight schools would like to go glass but this is mostly a financial-logistical decision. Most of the prestigeous flight schools started phasing in the glass long time ago. I base my opinion what I read on the subject in FLYING.Michael J.

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this