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Taxi light operation

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Is the taxi light considered to be one of the 'As needed' items depending on time of day and sight conditions or should the taxi light always be ON when taxi to/from the rwy?

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Obviously in use of night. Per checklists I believe most operators use them the same way landing lights are used. Even if its broad daylight I think its procedure to have them on. Also just a quick tip: Ramp crews will love you if you turn your taxi light off before turning into the gate at night. It's pretty bright from down on the ground. Anyone else feel free to correct me if I'm wrong as I don't I fly the NG in real life. Nate

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Yes, it's exactly the real world OPs I'm interested in...if there is some common regulations or if it maybe can be different between different airlines or maybe even different airports/parts of the world.Yes, I'm aware of switching the taxi light OFF before approaching the ground crew but thanks anyway :(

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The policy will vary between companies. At my airline the policy is to have the taxi light on at all times when moving, off when stopped or yielding to other aircraft. This does not prohibit turning the light off when it may be distracting to other aircraft.

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Light usage differs from airline to airline as Joe said. Here's a real world procedure that is current, and in use. Pre flt > Logos and Steady(Navs) on.Ready for pushback > Anti collision on.Ready to taxi > Taxi, Wing and Runway turnoffs all on irrespective of weather/traffic conditions and time of day. Wheel well light off.Crossing and or entering an active > Strobe and steady. (Then back to steady if only crossing an active).Take-off clearance received > Light it up like a Christmas tree (that means all lights on, except wheel well light of course). NOTE: for pulsed landing and or logo lights - Set to pulse during day, steady during night.After Takeoff (Gear and flaps up) > Taxi, Runway turnoffs, and retractable landing lights up and off.Passing 10,000ft > All Landing, wing and logo's off. Descending past 10,000ft > Non-retractable landing lights, runway turnoffs, taxi, wing, logos on.Before 500ft on finals> All lights on and pulsing if so equipped, irrespective of weather/traffic condition and time of day.Clear of the active> All landing lights off, Strobes off (move switch to steady). NOTE: Leave logo light on Pulse if so equipped.Approaching bay> Taxi, Runway turnoffs and wing lights off.***Engine shutdown> AFTER 15% N2, anti collisions off. CAUTION: care must be taken when turning off Anti-collision lights, as this is a visual indicator to ground crew that the aircraft is not underway and it's engines are shutdown. Death or injury can result if prematurely switched off. Ashley Frew. ***Note: I'm not sure when exactly the anti-collision lights get switched off, but 15% N2 is safe a safe bet.

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Might also want to only turn the landing lights on during final when you've been cleared to land by ATC.

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Might also want to only turn the landing lights on during final when you've been cleared to land by ATC.
Hi mate. Nice useable advice there, but without sounding harsh and with the utmost respect toward your input, it is not applicable for my airline; the procedure is outlined above.Ashley Frew.

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I know. I think it's Southwest that does what I mention. Or maybe they turn on the taxi light when cleared to land. I forget which. Hard to keep everyone straight... so many ways to skin a cat. Cheers,

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Every single aircraft that I have seen landing on Rwy26R at EGCC, at the Rwy turn-off switches its landing lights off but leaves the nose-wheel taxi light on right to the gate.

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Thanks alot for your thorough explanation Ashley, I guess the conclusion is that in some regard the policy might differ a bit between different airlines.

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***Note: I'm not sure when exactly the anti-collision lights get switched off, but 15% N2 is safe a safe bet.
Common rule for anti collision on ground : hydraulics are powered. Hence, before pushback when electrics pumps are switched ON and after landing/engine shutdown when electric pumps are switched off and hydraulic pressure reads zero or near zero, This is a message to the ground crew : steer clear of flight control surfaces they are "live" / mind your head !

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Also just a quick tip: Ramp crews will love you if you turn your taxi light off before turning into the gate at night. It's pretty bright from down on the ground.
When I was a ramp supervisor, I had a rampie tell me I had to report a crew for leaving the taxi light on. I had been sent to the gate because he refused to mashall the plane in. The reason? "Aircraft lights emit harmful radiation that can destroy your eyes." In all truth, yes, staring at a bright light can damage your eyes, but listening to this guy's explanation, he was talking more along the lines of x-rays and microwaves. No joke. He thought he'd lose his vision that day if he marshalled it in. Having been blasted by a few of the light retrofits (HIDs in lights now), I know it's bright and a pain in the butt, but it's not too bad. Most crews get the idea when you throw on sunglasses at 10PM. In the day time, you just run up and say something sarcastic like, "checklists much?" Of course, you also have to be prepared for the flipside of, "yeah, sorry about that...ground power much?"

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That's the funniest!Evidently there are differences. It's an eye opener for me too. I would of thought there would be a standardized procedure for light use at the regional level at least. Huh, go figure :)EMV - anti cols aren't put on to signify flight control movement for us. They are only ever put on to signify that the aircraft is underway and or an engine/s is about to run or is running. Allot of vehicles move around the airport, and the drivers of those vehicles are on a constant lookout for anti cols so as to maintain clearance between themselves and the aircraft. Vehicles at Sydney airport mustn't drive behind aircraft with anti-cols on at any time. You can see how things can become problematic if you put anti cols on just for flight control movement (major traffic jams, I've seen it). For the record, our flight crew contact the engineer for hydraulic pressurization clearance prior to departure, at which time the engineer will ensure flight control surfaces are clear of obstruction, then give clearance to the flight crew. So the procedure outlined above still rings true... at Aussie ports anyway. Out of curiosity EMV, does a carrier use the procedure you outlined for anti col lt usage? Interested to know in the event I fly the thing in your country/livery/carrier of choice.Cheers,Ash Frew.

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Taxi lights are on after push till you are at holding point to runway .. Then they go off . then the runway turnoff lights come on with the landing lights. On landing the landing lights are always on just below 10,000 ft They stay on till you exit runway then the taxi lights come back on till stand upon parking at stand they go off..

When I was a ramp supervisor, I had a rampie tell me I had to report a crew for leaving the taxi light on. I had been sent to the gate because he refused to mashall the plane in. The reason? "Aircraft lights emit harmful radiation that can destroy your eyes." In all truth, yes, staring at a bright light can damage your eyes, but listening to this guy's explanation, he was talking more along the lines of x-rays and microwaves. No joke. He thought he'd lose his vision that day if he marshalled it in. Having been blasted by a few of the light retrofits (HIDs in lights now), I know it's bright and a pain in the butt, but it's not too bad. Most crews get the idea when you throw on sunglasses at 10PM. In the day time, you just run up and say something sarcastic like, "checklists much?" Of course, you also have to be prepared for the flipside of, "yeah, sorry about that...ground power much?"
Yeah that is ture as soon as the aircraft is lined up for the stand they go off which is what the marshall is for..

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Having been blasted by a few of the light retrofits (HIDs in lights now), I know it's bright and a pain in the butt, but it's not too bad. Most crews get the idea when you throw on sunglasses at 10PM. In the day time, you just run up and say something sarcastic like, "checklists much?"
LOL, thanks, great read. What are HIDs though? And does anyone know what wattage the NGs or any other common landing and taxi lights have? I believe the taxies have 250W, but I wonder about the landings, at night they seem really bright even when NOT staring at them straight and still a considerable distance away. They sure are powerful but I'm curious about some numbers. sig.gif

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The landing lights are either 450 or 600 watt. and ~ 5000 or 7000 or so lumens respectively category: HALOGENvolt: 28amp: 16.1watt: 450base: Screw Terminalsglass: PAR46filament: C6fil.res.: 1.74 ohmm.o.l.: 4.12 inch (104MM)i.lumens: 3900000cp: 310000d.hours: 50notes:aircraft lampba:15x9landing lamp

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I am almost certain that most airlines in the EU and in Southern Africa all have landing lights on passing below 10 000 ft and off climbing above.Exactly when they come on though can differ slightly - some airlines SOP is Landing lights on when entering the active runway ( position and hold/line up and wait call from the tower) and some have them off until they have their departure clearance to indicate that they are rolling.Strobes should be on when entering the runway so to improve your visibility and generally remain on throughout the flight until exiting the active, unless flying in cloud where they can become a nuisance by reflecting off the cloud and causing an unnecessary distraction on the flightdeck.

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That's the funniest! Evidently there are differences. It's an eye opener for me too. I would of thought there would be a standardized procedure for light use at the regional level at least. Huh, go figure :) EMV - anti cols aren't put on to signify flight control movement for us. They are only ever put on to signify that the aircraft is underway and or an engine/s is about to run or is running. Allot of vehicles move around the airport, and the drivers of those vehicles are on a constant lookout for anti cols so as to maintain clearance between themselves and the aircraft. Vehicles at Sydney airport mustn't drive behind aircraft with anti-cols on at any time. You can see how things can become problematic if you put anti cols on just for flight control movement (major traffic jams, I've seen it). For the record, our flight crew contact the engineer for hydraulic pressurization clearance prior to departure, at which time the engineer will ensure flight control surfaces are clear of obstruction, then give clearance to the flight crew. So the procedure outlined above still rings true... at Aussie ports anyway. Out of curiosity EMV, does a carrier use the procedure you outlined for anti col lt usage? Interested to know in the event I fly the thing in your country/livery/carrier of choice. Cheers,Ash Frew.
Yeah I know for a fact that for at least two very very reputable airlines this a practical anti collision ON/OFF general rule (stress on practical and not legal) which also coincides with movement start/stop . As far as strict legal requirements go, not my department. Hence, transferring here hearsay, albeit, from very reliable authority. Makes sense in a a practical manner too, no ?

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