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curt1

'AIRBAG' approaches

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I learned years ago a way to memorize the steps needed to handle an approach, but I don't often hear about folks using memory aids. I thought I would post it here, and maybe it'll help some beginners or experienced pilots alike. It goes like this:A - ATIS. Check the ATIS for landing runway. (Not very helpful in FSX with airliners, so check the map and airport for runway winds).I - Install the approach in FMC. Select arrivals, choose runway and transition, close discontinuities, and select v-speeds.R - Radios. If ILS runway, dial in the appropriate radio frequency in one or both radios.B - Brief the approach. Or as I prefer, B for 'bug' in setting the course on the MCP followed by minimums altitude.A - Approach checklist. Or as I prefer, A for 'arm' the VOR/LOC, along with arming the autobrakes and spoilers. You'll have to expand this to include lights, start switches, etc...G - Go-Around. Ensure you have a go-around waypoint in the FMC, and you dial in the missed approach altitude on the MCP.This isn't a perfect approach checklist, but it does allow you to recall from memory and you can adjust it to your liking. I'd like to hear about other memory aids if you know of them, such as for takeoff.

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I learned years ago a way to memorize the steps needed to handle an approach, but I don't often hear about folks using memory aids. I thought I would post it here, and maybe it'll help some beginners or experienced pilots alike. It goes like this:A - ATIS. Check the ATIS for landing runway. (Not very helpful in FSX with airliners, so check the map and airport for runway winds).I - Install the approach in FMC. Select arrivals, choose runway and transition, close discontinuities, and select v-speeds.R - Radios. If ILS runway, dial in the appropriate radio frequency in one or both radios.B - Brief the approach. Or as I prefer, B for 'bug' in setting the course on the MCP followed by minimums altitude.A - Approach checklist. Or as I prefer, A for 'arm' the VOR/LOC, along with arming the autobrakes and spoilers. You'll have to expand this to include lights, start switches, etc...G - Go-Around. Ensure you have a go-around waypoint in the FMC, and you dial in the missed approach altitude on the MCP.This isn't a perfect approach checklist, but it does allow you to recall from memory and you can adjust it to your liking. I'd like to hear about other memory aids if you know of them, such as for takeoff.
I was quite concered, reading the title, thought you were telling me my mother in law was on her way...phew!!!

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Glad my post was taken in the right tone. :)On a serious note, airbag is a good acronym to keep in mind when you're nearing your approach. I first heard it in use watching aoa's 744 training series.Another (seriously) good one is C.R.A.F.T for requesting takeoff clearance. It's an easy way to jot everything down in a nice ordered list.ClearanceRouteAltitudeFrequencyTransponder

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ClearanceRouteAltitudeFrequencyTransponder
Mostly this applies to copying clearances. These are the 5 items you will always receive, and in that order when listening to a clearance. Take off clearances are much more abbreviated, usually a heading and altitude (especially amendments to the altitude received from clearance delivery). I still teach it to students and I learned it during primary training.A good practice is to write CRAFT vertically when copying clearances if you're a newbie. (like you did!)EXAMPLE:C-- clearance limit. (ie usually your destination)R-- as filed or whatever amendments they made to your flight planA-- initial altitude and usually time to expect cruise altitude. (ie climb to 3,000 expect 7,000 ten minutes after departure)F-- departure's radio frequencyT-- transponder codeSpin recovery:P- power offA- ailerons neutralR- rudder opposite the direction of the spinE- elevator down (yoke forward)VFR day/night minimum equipment as per the FAA. I'll only fill this one out if someone is curious.TOMATOFLAMES/FLAPSAviation is all about the abbreviations and memory items like this....

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Thank you Zach, another good one that I can use. I really like taking detailed procedures and making them simple, and acronyms do that for me.

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Before take offL ANDING LIGHTSL OWER DU CLEAREDA UTOTHROTTLE ARMEDA UTOBRAKES ONS TROBE LIGHTS ONT ERRAIN ONT CAS TA/RA ONDescent (10,000 ft):F UEL PUMPSL ANDING LIGHTSA IRSPEEDA PUP RESSURISATIONS EATBELTS

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L.I.M.A.Learn Instead of Memorizing Acronyms.Haha, no joke.
Weak. Go ahead and study for a Commercial and CFI test without learning acronyms!But seriously, "Learn"?. Most learn through repetition anyway. What better way to repeat than to memorize anecdotes and acronyms. It's easy for one to dismiss another person's method of learning when they themselves have never been through the process.Otherwise, I like it. ;)

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Weak. Go ahead and study for a Commercial and CFI test without learning acronyms!But seriously, "Learn"?. Most learn through repetition anyway. What better way to repeat than to memorize anecdotes and acronyms. It's easy for one to dismiss another person's method of learning when they themselves have never been through the process.Otherwise, I like it. ;)
I didn't make that up. I heard it going through JSUPT with the Navy -- long before I was a weird lawyer (referring to the weird lawyer bit that you subsequently deleted -- hey, I liked that).And, I don't exactly lack perspective. Commercial Pilot, Multi-Engine, Instrument Airplane with ATP certificate is plenty.Anyway, you're exactly right. There are a multitude of learning styles. For me, I always successfully relied on muscle memory.

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Those are great, Zach. I used to get so nervous on the radio as a student. My instructor would get a kick out of me freezing up in the middle of reading back an instruction. It went away eventually, but for a while the radio was the hardest part of flight training! Loser.gif

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Those are great, Zach. I used to get so nervous on the radio as a student. My instructor would get a kick out of me freezing up in the middle of reading back an instruction. It went away eventually, but for a while the radio was the hardest part of flight training! Loser.gif
It's nice if you can learn to fly at a small airport where the controllers are forgiving. Once you've built up the confidence, try your hat at a Class B airport. I see you're in the southern US. KTPA and KMCO are good fun and a good balance of busy and relaxed atmosphere. KATL is a great learning experience, just be sure you have your #@!$ together first.

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Acronyms are useful if they are useful to you. To me, CRAFT, for example, was always kind of silly, since they give you information and you copy it and repeat it back. I don't need an acronym to remember to repeat something, but I suppose useful for a test, although thinking back to your last clearance would work too. As for in the air: AIRBAG sounds useful, GUMPS is a popular for small aircraft. But, generally, use an acronym if you need to. That was never my thing, but if it helps you remember, then do it.

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My FBO was located at KLIT. It's relatively quiet. The controllers were always very nice. Gave me a tour of the facility and showed me how things worked on their end. Lots of small airports in the around for practice. I hope I can get back into it one day. sad.png

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It's nice if you can learn to fly at a small airport where the controllers are forgiving. Once you've built up the confidence, try your hat at a Class B airport. I see you're in the southern US. KTPA and KMCO are good fun and a good balance of busy and relaxed atmosphere. KATL is a great learning experience, just be sure you have your #@!$ together first.
I've been to most of the busy SE airports in the US! I also frequent the Washington Dulles/SFRA zone. Busy is my forte! Try flying a pipeline patrol 4 miles east of the Dulles airport. I do it once a week! Whew.gifNotice my home airport lies just north of Charlotte Douglas International (a busy class B airport).
Acronyms are useful if they are useful to you. To me, CRAFT, for example, was always kind of silly, since they give you information and you copy it and repeat it back. I don't need an acronym to remember to repeat something, but I suppose useful for a test, although thinking back to your last clearance would work too. As for in the air: AIRBAG sounds useful, GUMPS is a popular for small aircraft. But, generally, use an acronym if you need to. That was never my thing, but if it helps you remember, then do it.
Yeah, that's why I said CRAFT is for newbies getting a clearance. It's not so silly when you're new to copying clearances and delivery gives you a mouth full.
My FBO was located at KLIT. It's relatively quiet. The controllers were always very nice. Gave me a tour of the facility and showed me how things worked on their end. Lots of small airports in the around for practice. I hope I can get back into it one day. sad.png
I thought you were setting up a joke, Chris.

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KGGG is a good place to learn. Only 2 regional round-trips daily. B-52's used to come over from barksdale afb to do touch&go's back in the day. Was also an alternate for the shuttle...

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I've been to most of the busy SE airports in the US! I also frequent the Washington Dulles/SFRA zone. Busy is my forte! Try flying a pipeline patrol 4 miles east of the Dulles airport. I do it once a week! Whew.gifNotice my home airport lies just north of Charlotte Douglas International (a busy class B airport).Yeah, that's why I said CRAFT is for newbies getting a clearance. It's not so silly when you're new to copying clearances and delivery gives you a mouth full.I thought you were setting up a joke, Chris.
hehehe For once, I'm not. There's definitely a lot of potential there.

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