Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

btacon

The Wreck of the Costa Concordia

Recommended Posts

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-01-15/Italian-cruise-ship/52587626/1Perhaps a bit "off-topic" but then again perhaps not.As I begin to separate the wheat from the chaff concerning this Major Incident, I see many parallels concerning this mode of transport's crash and that of it's sister, the aeroplane. Early confusion and speculation concerning the crash. Finger-pointing and pundits who "know all the facts" before the facts have been gathered. A series of cascading events that individually contribute to the event, and perhaps a bit of hubris and the frailty of the human condition.There can really be no discussion at this time concerning the events of Friday night beyond what a tragedy it is, and what a greater tragedy it may become both on a human and a financial scale. My hope is that this thread will evolve as the facts become known and we can use it as a topic of analysis and learning.My thoughts as of today, Jan 16th, 2012,Braun

Share this post


Link to post

You can have good updates about this disaster in this forum:http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/open-discussion/last-voyage-costa-concordia-cruise-ship-41313.html

Share this post


Link to post

Not off topic as there are similar behaviour patterns in this compared to behaviours in Aviation, only difference is this accident happens in very slow motion compared to a 747 falling out of the sky.Captain of this ship seems to have taken this ship off its autopilot for some reason, maybe to show off, maybe to give the passengers a closer view of Isola Del Giglio. He was way off course and somewhere he wasn't supposed to be. Someone gots some explaining to do.I recon this accident will be very costly compared to Aviation seeing how much it costs to build a ship like that, This ship probably costs around the same as 2 747's. Also the pending lawsuits from the 3000+ passengers and 1000+ crew compared to around 500 passengers on a 747.Now Italy is left with a big mess to clean-up. Like here in New Zealand we have commited to cleaning up the Rena entirely, but that is how New Zealand Environment Laws work. You can't leave a shipwreck on a reef, it has to be 100% Removed. Italy will most likely have to do the same, cut it up and scrap it or drag it somewhere else. It is estimated it will take 2 years to clean up the Rena and the costs of that will be astronomical. Cheers

Share this post


Link to post

After this accident,http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuninter_Flight_1153I wonder what the Ships bridge crew and pilot will face,as far as jail time?

Share this post


Link to post

I wouldn't want to be caught up in Italian Justice. Look at the manslaughter charges against Italian geologists for not being able to predict the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake??? That sort of earthquake predicting is never possible and yet they are up on Manslaughter charges.

Share this post


Link to post

That is not the first time that the Costa Concordia shaved close to Gilio Island. In fact in this video the ship is in almost the exact same place and distance from shore as the last time. When this was broadcast on Italian TV the company was quick to say that the event caught on the video had been authorized, whereas the most recent one was not. Seems like Costa may have promoted "showing the flag" with most of their ships at places which were filled with tourists for advertising and promotional purposes. Perhaps they are lucky to have gotten away with it up to now.http://video.corrier...52-5f77182bc574Compare the video with this photo: It was taken last week a minute or two after the ship struck the rocks on the port quarter, immediately before the water intake began to outrace the pumps which flooded the engine and generator rooms.850Costa_Concordia.jpgThey dropped their starboard (right) anchor which pulled the ship all the way around to face in the south direction and settled on the narrow ledge facing the small harbour. The power was generated by the emergency generators located on the top deck, just below the funnel.917On_ledge.jpgIf the anchor had not caught and held the vessel would have glided out into deep water and would not have been able to power back into shallow water. In that case the loss of life would probably be in the thousands.Kind regards,

Share this post


Link to post
728map.jpg906sunk.jpg475hole.jpgNotice the huge rock imbedded right into the ship's side, near the waterline. Damage was for about 160 feet. 100 years ago on April 15, 1912 the Titanic (45,000 tons) sank after scrapping its side for about 300 feet on an iceberg, lost almost entirely by bad luck. The Costa Concordia (114,000 tons) sank faster and is by far the largest passenger ship lost at any time. It is unlikely that it can be economically salvaged, but even if could, it is debatable if it would be wise to do so. It is now a death ship, lost entirely by utter fools.Kind regards,

Share this post


Link to post

Two words come to mind when I see this one: Exxon Valdez

Share this post


Link to post
[it is now a death ship, lost entirely by utter fools.Kind regards,
Agreed completely. The level of malfeasence here, from the decision to travel so close to the coastline to the Capt. Abandoning ship ahead of the pacs, to the delays in calling Mayday and worse the delay to deploy the lifeboats, all simply boggles the mind.When i began this thread I mentioned the possibility of Hubris. Now that the facts are coming out that was definately a factor, but we can now add both Malice And Animus just to name a few!Braun

Share this post


Link to post

It is being reported this morning that according to satelite data the sail by last year of the Costa Concordia was a dangerous close call, and actually closer to the island than it was last week, with the ship being only 230 meters from the island instead of the reported 500 meters. That was about the ship's width difference between last year's stunt and the final one. It just barely escaped hitting the rocks to the south because it entered the shallows just a few meters farther north. Lloyds is calling the earlier one a near miss. This demonstrates a culture of recklessness that is impossible to reconcile with any kind of forethought, let alone prudence. The actions of the Captain is a dark smear on the heritage of valour in the face of danger, as recorded in the annals of marine history and in the hearts of seafarers of all nations, cultures and creeds; women and children first.http://video.corrier...52-5f77182bc574The ship has shifted again which has prompted another urgent evacuation of the emergency personel searching the vessel. The wreck is increasingly showing that it is dangerously unstable and seemingly on the very edge of sliding off the ledge into deep water. According to depth charts only the aft part of the vessel is perched on the ledge with the front half of the hull hanging over a precipice. The challenge will be to pump the oil out of the tanks that are in the slightly heavier aft section in such a way as not to thereby induce a slide. It could plunge off it's precarious perch and roll completely under with the slightest weight or sea shift. Here is a direct cut and paste from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) published today:"Meanwhile, the BBC is reporting that satellite tracking information shows the Costa Concordia sailed closer to Giglio island on a cruise last August than it did on its disastrous voyage on Friday.The BBC quotes the shipping journal Lloyd's List Intelligence as saying the vessel passed within 230 metres of the island last Aug. 14 to mark La Notte di San Lorenzo — the night of the shooting stars festival on the island.The route deviation on that occasion had apparently been authorized by Costa Cruises, BBC says. The company said on Monday that the ship was never closer than 500 meters to the coast when it passed by on Aug. 14.Lloyd's List describes that occasion as a "near miss" and says the ship's route would have been less than 200 metres away from the point of collision on Friday's voyage, BBC says."

Share this post


Link to post

The Voyage Data Recorders (VDR's - equivalent to an A/C's black box) are going to be the evidence that crucifies this guy (I refuse to label him a "Captain") and probably his entire bridge crew at the time. Until the end of this month, I am in the maritime business - I then retire. Fortunately for us, none of our equipment was aboard this ship. This guy's idiocy is going to cost the industry considerably before it is all over. You are hearing snippets of that already.Someone mentioned EXXON Valdez... We had navigation equipment aboard that ship. EXXON tried to implicate our equipment as a cause of the grounding. They sent out a team of lawyers and clerks in the "discovery phase", where they go through every document, procedure, quality control instruction, personal interviews, etc. etc. that might relate to, or justify / prove their claim. They occupied offices in our facility for weeks and tied up dozens of our people, lawyers and contracts personnel for a lot longer. In the end, EXXON dropped all intent to pursue the faulty equipment strategy when it became obvious that the cause was the captain, not us. (Not to mention that our equipment worked flawlessly, even after the event)...Bottom line: it cost us approximately $10 million to work through the "discovery phase" that they had instigated.

Share this post


Link to post

The Japanese say: "Duty is heavy as a mountain; death is as light as a feather."I think the captain should have watched a little more John Wayne as a child - but - hey - he was popular with the ladies...I can't even comprehend his actions...Regards,Scott

Share this post


Link to post

Seldom have normally circumspect organizations released information on a major disaster like is happening now at every level of corporate, governmental, regulatory and underwriting marine entities. Lloyds of London has just released a chart showing the exact routes taken by the Costa Concordia on August 14th (in the above video link) and the fatal one on January 13th. As is clearly shown the vessel nearly hit land twice in the earlier stunt and was significantly closer to the rocks she now sits on.660stupidity.jpgAs can be seen from this picture, the distances are not great, and the shoreline dangerous to approach without extreme caution day or night.586isola_20del_20giglio_2.jpgKind regards,

Share this post


Link to post

This chart shows the precarious perch upon which the Costa Concordia now lies on it's starboard side. The majority of the hull is suspended over deeper water and in imminent danger of sliding forward or to the east and plunging entirely beneath the surface. The strain on the vessel by the uneven distribution of support also puts it at significant risk of breaking in half just at the forward part of the larger engine room and dining room spaces. 316CostaConcordia.jpgThe aft part of the hull and side that is in contact with the ledge is barely heavier than the unsupported amidships and bow areas. Therefore any shifting of weight, like the removal of oil from the main fuel tanks that are located in the aft section, or heavy sea swell action from westerly inclement weather could upset the delicate balancing act, causing the Concordia to either slide or roll off and sink into the 175 to 300 foot deep trench that surrounds it on 3 sides, or break at the weakest point with the forward part of the vessel sinking alone.294luxurycruiseship.jpgAnyway, here is solid proof, if any were needed that evil avoided is evil defeated, or in secular terms, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.Kind regards,

Share this post


Link to post

Meanwhile I see that the Presidient of the ship's classification society (RINA) has resigned (classification society is sort of like FAA for seaworthiness). In commericial maritime there is an organization, IMO, which is like ICAO for aviation. A primary standard like the ICAO convention is International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).scott s..

Share this post


Link to post

If fuel starts leaking from that location of the ship, that would make a huge mess for that port community and island. Hopefully Savators can access the ship with pumps and get fuel out of there ASAP.We are dealing with the Rena north of where I live. It is estimated it will take 2 years to clean up that mess. Salvators have been doing a good job so far, work is slow due to the dangers of working on a listing ship on a reef in the South Pacific where anything can happen. According to New Zealand Law it will be required to clean up 100% of the Rena as you cannot leave a wreck on a reef in this country. My Tax Dollars are paying to clean up that mess and hopefully the ship owners and insurance companies will compensate us.This Costa Concordia will have to be completely removed as well as you cannot leave it where it is. Italian laws are different then New Zealand laws so maybe they just end up dragging it out to sea....Out of sight, out of mind. You never know with the ItaliansCheers

Share this post


Link to post

"Out of sight, out of mind. You never know with the Italians"Well the Med has extreme depths (it's really a squashed ocean) so it could probably be safely sunk once the fuel has been removed, plus other possible environmental threats. It would then become a habitat for sealife.

Share this post


Link to post
"Out of sight, out of mind. You never know with the Italians"Well the Med has extreme depths (it's really a squashed ocean) so it could probably be safely sunk once the fuel has been removed, plus other possible environmental threats. It would then become a habitat for sealife.
True and there is nothing wrong with a first class artificial reef. The Fishies can have fun in that cruiseliner. Stick that in the Guiness Book of World Records as the worlds most expensive artificial reef.Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
The Fishies can have fun in that cruiseliner.Cheers
Well, after all, Carnival, which owns Costa and the Costa Concordia, call their ships "The Fun Ships". I don't imagine things are too much fun at Carnival right now, with plunging stocks, and most likely a severe customer backlash, particularily with their european brands of Costa Cruise Lines, P&O Cruise Shipping Line, Princess Cruises, Cunard Line, and the Holland America Lines.Kind regards,

Share this post


Link to post

It is hard to see how it could be refloated given its sheer bulk. The Med has no tides to speak of so there'd be no help from a spring tide. I suspect they'll have to cut it up where it is. Hell of a job though.

Share this post


Link to post

From Hans van Rooij of Rotterdam-based Smit Salvage (who raised the Kursk Submarine in Russia)....Van Rooij said there were really only two options for this salvage: Patch up the 50-meter (160-foot) gash in the Concordia's hull and attempt to refloat it, or carve up the liner where it lies into chunks small enough to be carried away on barges.No word on if Smit Salvage will be awarded this multi-million dollar contract but I would think it is likely to go to them. I predict that like the Rena in New Zealand it will have to be 100% Removed from the environment. Salvaging it will also allow it to be scrapped and the contract will likely give Smit Salvage a percentage of the scrap and fittings salvaged.A big big job and a rather exciting Discovery Channel Show if you ask me...CheersEdit: Here is the article I was readinghttp://www.ajc.com/travel/salvage-experts-weigh-the-1307163.html

Share this post


Link to post
The Voyage Data Recorders (VDR's - equivalent to an A/C's black box) are going to be the evidence that crucifies this guy (I refuse to label him a "Captain") and probably his entire bridge crew at the time. Until the end of this month, I am in the maritime business - I then retire. Fortunately for us, none of our equipment was aboard this ship. This guy's idiocy is going to cost the industry considerably before it is all over. You are hearing snippets of that already.
I'm in the "maritime business" as well, and I can say that I would have had sympathy for him running around (even resulting in deaths/injuries of passengers). He made extremely bad decisions, and would answer for it. However, when he made the decision to abandon the ship, and more importantly abandon the lives of the people he was responsible for (passengers and crew), he not only crossed a line, but pole vaulted over it. I lost all sympathy, and agree he is not a "Captain" and has lost all rights to be called such.While I don't know the Italian legal system, in US terms, hope he is prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law, and then let the civil cases against him fly.

Share this post


Link to post

Here is a released QPS electronic record of the exact movements of the Costa Concordia last Friday evening. It shows the collision and aftermath.Qastor Pilotage software reconstruction:

Kind regards,

Share this post


Link to post

One difference between this and an airplane crash - the captain of a plane would never order airplane food to impress his date.

Share this post


Link to post
×
×
  • Create New...