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GNS 530, GNS 430 or both in my new Duke?

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I bought the Duke today, and the RXP GNS 530 WAAS. What is the pros of having also the GNS 430? I am an total noob on these units.

 

Anyone care to enlighten me on how you use these two units in practice, and how they work together? Would I be happy to have both?

 

Thanks,

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The GNS430 is the little brother of the GNS530. Its just a matter of size preference. As far as I know, they have the same functionality. However, some aircraft such as the A36 from Carenado only allow you to include the small variant, while the RealAir Duke's allow you to install either one. 

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As Andy said, for some airplanes, it comes down to size and space in the panel.

 

If you happen to have both, you can have the flightplan open on one and the terrain map on the

other (as an example). In the real world, it also buys you some redundancy, which matters less in FSX..

 

I like to fly the F33 Bonanza, and there only a 430 will fit ^_^

 

If you are new to the RXP GNS units, try to select an RNAV(GPS) approach into an airport

and fly the LPV glidepath - quite a neat change from ILS approaches.

 

Example:

 

Position yourself at KTPA.

 

GNS in GPS mode (not VLOC)

 

Select Direct-to KTPA.

 

PROC to select approach: RNAV 36L, via PIE

 

Set the autopilot to 2000 feet and let the autopilot fly the flightplan, in NAV mode

 

When the glideslope indicator on the HSI becomes active, you push APR on the autopilot.

 

 

After you've learned to use the various features, you may want to update the navigation

database. Visit the Simforums.com site and look for the RXP support forum for instructions.

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Thanks guys, great info!

 

I have allready got the navdata "update" via the GTN trainer so I'll be updating it as soon as I have installed. I don't need the 430 for any other aircrafts yet, so I'll just be installing the 530 for now.

 

Full Acronis image running tonight and tomorrow after work I'll be enjoying my newly aquired Duke and the GNS :)

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The biggest advantage I find to having both in the Duke is something Bert mentions: being able to have two different displays open at the same time.  I can always have the terrain display up on one that way.  Would I buy a second one JUST to have that?  Probably not, but since I need one of each for different planes (I have several which can only accommodate one or the other) I've found this a nice feature to have.

 

Scott

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The 530 does a few more things than the 430. For example, the 530 displays radial and distance to a stationed tuned to NAV1, even if the CDI is set to GPS. I also think the 530 does aural terrain warnings.

 

It also has a nice large map...

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Hello,

I'm using both. specially the 430 for vertical navigation. practical to calculate the time for descent.

Serge

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Additionally if you feel like spending some cash, you can buy the unlimited pack, and the 530 and 430 will "talk" to each other. That's an additional $100 for the software. So you'd be paying $200 total for everything.

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I can support these comments with RXP 430 and 530/430 samples. I primarily fly the Bonanza F33 with thew single 430 and the Cessna T210M with the 530/430 combo the Unlimited pack. In the latter, I typically use the 530 for Flight Plan/Moving Map and the 430 for TA (Traffic Advisory) in flat areas (e.g. Texas) and TAWS (Terrain) for mountain areas.

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