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Austin Meyer (creator of X-Plane) updates us on his patent troll problem

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I'm sure we've heard Meyer's problem with patent trolls suing him for "infringing" on vague patents.

 

Here's the update, uploaded a few days ago:

 

 

 

Very infuriating stuff... Thankfully, his videos are receiving quite a lot of coverage and hopefully some action will be taken against those that participate in this.

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Unbelievable!

 

Thx for sharing, and a good reason for supporting X-Plane 10...

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That's only one point within ~100 or so Meyer will need to defend. Basically the US patent system is rotten dating from the 19th century. Obama wants to help but gets blocked by republicans, lawyers and big companies like MS. They will need to look at EU laws and learn, sooner or later, as it's a threat for us economy.

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That's only one point within ~100 or so Meyer will need to defend. Basically the US patent system is rotten dating from the 19th century. Obama wants to help but gets blocked by republicans, lawyers and big companies like MS. They will need to look at EU laws and learn, sooner or later, as it's a threat for us economy.

 

I'm happy to live in Europe and find some people over there lost there minds.

Hence I think from an European perspective the Justice system is so of track you can't speak of justice but almost a criminal system ;)

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As a European, it's hard not to think that America has seriously lost its way which is worrying for the world.

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   'Merica = Land of the free, home of the lawsuit! What a sad state of affairs. I feel for Mr. Meyer, and anyone else getting shafted by these crooks.

Wish him the best of luck.

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As a European, it's hard not to think that America has seriously lost its way which is worrying for the world.

 

 

Don't worry, we think the same thing about you guys. 

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That's only one point within ~100 or so Meyer will need to defend. Basically the US patent system is rotten dating from the 19th century. Obama wants to help but gets blocked by republicans, lawyers and big companies like MS. They will need to look at EU laws and learn, sooner or later, as it's a threat for us economy.

How about we refrain from partisan politics around here - we get enough of this junk in the real world...

 

Regards,

Scott

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The problem is not limited to a country or region. It is deeply rooted in the dilapidated status of the legal profession, being a member of which I am sometimes ashamed of. Congrats to Mr. Meyer for standing up and resisting to be silenced through a settlement. He is innovative and courageous. 

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How about we refrain from partisan politics around here - we get enough of this junk in the real world...

 

Regards,

Scott

 

 

No interest in getting into a politics discussion here either but CyberMike's comment is factually inaccurate.  I looked into this a while back.

 

Carry on...

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As a European, it's hard not to think that America has seriously lost its way which is worrying for the world.

 

I totally agree with your thoughts, sad but true.

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No interest in getting into a politics discussion here either but CyberMike's comment is factually inaccurate.  I looked into this a while back.

 

Carry on...

What is inaccurate? What did you look into? I remember Austin to have said that this is only one point and he expects more to follow. The us patent system dates from 19th century, don't remember where I read this, but should be true as well.

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As a European, it's hard not to think that America has seriously lost its way which is worrying for the world.

As an American myself, it makes it hard to say, but I totally agree.  This country is not headed in a good direction at all.  If it wouldn't be for not wanting to move my daughter away from her family here, I'd be moving out of this country in a heartbeat.  In fact, if things do continue to get worse, I may move to get my daughter somewhere better/safer.

 

The political and legal system here are absolute jokes.  Both need to be completely torn down and done over!

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The American pentent system is completely over the top. This kind of trash simply would not get to court in Europe. I read somewhere that someone had a patent on the air we breath!

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The patent belongs to an European Corp (Luxembourg) founded in Australia. The patent is filed in Australia.

 

This is international greed, folks.

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The problem isn't one of the patent system being rotten, or America or Obama or Republicans. The problem is that the courts in America have been captured by industry, specifically the appeals courts - Ars Technica had an excellent review of the subject. The Supreme Court has been weighing in on the subject recently, as has Congress and have been pushing to invalidate non-obvious patents and to more easily grant costs for frivolous suits.

 

Patents and IP law, by the way, when applied correctly are a major asset for a small company making novel inventions - like Laminar.

 

Cheers!

Luke

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Patents and IP law, by the way, when applied correctly are a major asset for a small company making novel inventions - like Laminar.

Not in the Software business. Patents were invented to protect people that put a lot of ideas and money into the development of this idea. When people simply stole their plans they had a real advantage.

In the software business most ideas and principles are rather simple. You get and develop the idea in a single day. The tricky part is the implementation of this idea. This depends totally on your environment and methods. This implementation takers years of development and testing.

So the simple idea doesn't really help you in any significant way. It is much easier and faster to develop an idea on your own way than to look into a databank and look igf there might be an idea that might help you.

The basic ideras and principles are so common that it would be a pretty good idea to simply ask someone.Even if you would listen to his ideas the end result would be something completly different.

 

In fact mjany of the patent trolls simply register well known methods or even standards that were established to allow the communication between programs. The main reason why they don't dare to go to court with software patents is in fact that it is especially permited to even reverse engineer another program if you need this information to properly connect to the other program.. The second reason isthat the judge can decide that one side wanted to abuse the justice system and that he has to pay a penalty. So a patent troll would often loose money in court.

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In the software business most ideas and principles are rather simple. You get and develop the idea in a single day. The tricky part is the implementation of this idea. This depends totally on your environment and methods. This implementation takers years of development and testing.

 

One could easily say that the internal combustion engine is no different - you're merely using the energy from burning fuel and converting it into rotational energy. The idea is very, very simple - you can explain it to a middle-school student - and all of the hard work in the last 100 years has been in implementation. Yet no one challenges the notion of patents in this space.

 

The problem isn't that software isn't novel or is unpatentable - it's that there are plenty of invalid patents floating around.

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

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Luke, on 09 Jun 2016 - 11:35 PM, said:

 

One could easily say that the internal combustion engine is no different -

But you have to show that you were the first one with this idea, Most ideas that stand behind software were developed years before. Your extremely simple description doesn't really work. If this would be the case the diesel engine would have been a simple copy of the steam engine, which is not the case. But it is nearly impossible to get into more details without giving roadmap how to modify a program, to get around this patent.

Software patents are so generic that they are more or less stupid. In a computer you only have rules, but I can simply redifne the rules. You can protect an idea for the real world, which has fixed rules, but in a computer there is no reality.

If I invent an idea that I only have to redefine certain values and get a very goot solution for a real problem, I can protect this idea, but not the code that describes this solution.

Computer code is best protected by copyright law. And you can easily prove that someone copied you code by the pattern of its systemcalls and values.

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Did anyone catch that Uniloc is an Australian Corporation suing in USA?

Uniloc is an American company who acquired the rights to the patent from the Australian "programmer" who wrote the silly and vague definition for the "idea."

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I did not know that John Oliver had done a show on "Patent Trolls" that actually had Austin Meyrs' case near the beginning of the segment. Man, I just love John Oliver. He is not only funny, but on target with his scathing scorn:

 

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Uniloc is an American company who acquired the rights to the patent from the Australian "programmer" who wrote the silly and vague definition for the "idea."

 No it is originally an Australia company,  They do have a US subsidiary called Uniloc USA which was setup in 2003, but the parent company is Uniloc Corporation in Australia.

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