mikebxb

Flying Irma

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Been using Skyvector and FS Global Real Weather to monitor IRMA while flying folks out of harm's way. Been experiencing some pretty intense weather, depending on which airport I fly out of!  My wishes are with the millions of folks being effected by this massive storm.

Martin

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Was sitting parked at KEYW and after a about 3 hours my plane had been pushed about 20 feet with the parking brake on. Peak winds were gusting to 32 knots when I started and were at 46 knots when I stopped.

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I often have wondered how Real Weather simulates these storms, ie. does it model the turbulence and wind directions, as well as the cloud density and coverage.

John

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20 minutes ago, Cactus521 said:

I often have wondered how Real Weather simulates these storms, ie. does it model the turbulence and wind directions, as well as the cloud density and coverage.

Does the video I linked above give you any indication? Using ActiveSky, mind you.

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37 minutes ago, Captain Kevin said:

Does the video I linked above give you any indication? Using ActiveSky, mind you.

Just watched it--you got bounced around quite a bit there and the Airspeed was jumping up and down quite a bit.  Tough flight!

John

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28 minutes ago, Cactus521 said:

Just watched it--you got bounced around quite a bit there and the Airspeed was jumping up and down quite a bit.  Tough flight!

Yeah, that was not fun. Crazy to think it took only just a matter of seconds to go from me calmly explaining the situation to me full on yelling whilst simultaneously pushing the thrust levers all the way up.

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i love flying in bad weather so i've been cruising aroudn the caribeean a lot lately. the activesky hurricane modeling is really cool. it's fun to fly through the eye. i've been doing passes in the p-8 pmdg variant, it would be cool if there was a high end p-3 payware for what the NOAA guys use. 

i notice on the p-3 videos that both pilots have hands on the yoke and there's a 3rd pilot just riding the throttles, it seems like it requires a lot of constant input changes. i read that they do runs at different altitudes like 5,000, 10,000 feet stuff like that but i ahven't really seen a detailed description of how they normally fly one.

in activesky when you enter the eye it's great how you get the circular walls and calm conditions, really neat! i know other people are doing it too, on their PIREPS map there's usually quite a few reports tracking eye position and flights in the vicinity.

good luck to everybody in the path of this storm and those affected by harvey

cheers,-andy crosby

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1 minute ago, spesimen said:

i love flying in bad weather so i've been cruising aroudn the caribeean a lot lately. the activesky hurricane modeling is really cool. it's fun to fly through the eye. i've been doing passes in the p-8 pmdg variant, it would be cool if there was a high end p-3 payware for what the NOAA guys use. 

i notice on the p-3 videos that both pilots have hands on the yoke and there's a 3rd pilot just riding the throttles, it seems like it requires a lot of constant input changes. i read that they do runs at different altitudes like 5,000, 10,000 feet stuff like that but i ahven't really seen a detailed description of how they normally fly one.

in activesky when you enter the eye it's great how you get the circular walls and calm conditions, really neat! i know other people are doing it too, on their PIREPS map there's usually quite a few reports tracking eye position and flights in the vicinity.

good luck to everybody in the path of this storm and those affected by harvey

cheers,-andy crosby

Amazing how the weather can be modeled so accurately as to replicate passing into the eye of the storm.  I usually configure my weather manually since I like clear sky VFR flight over my photoreal scenery in P3d.  Sometimes I will add a layer of cumulus just to watch the clouds and their shadows on the landscape, which really adds a new dimension to flying that was not there in FSX with no noticeable hit on performance.  I often wonder why it took so long to add cloud shadows since we've had mountain twilight shadows since FS2002, which did not seem to impact performance on iota.  I often think FS2002 was the major shift in simming we had waited for, quite a change from FS98.  It's legacy, such as landclass, is still found in Prepare3d and other sims today.  Clouds were its only weakness but I usually flew with just the realistic looking high cirrus.

John

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7 hours ago, MaDDogz said:

Can someone post a pic of how it looks on active sky weather map?

 

Thanks

I'm still using AS2012.  Yes, I know, it's old, outdated, but so am I as well as my computer.  I captured these images of the AS2012 map and the National Weather Service radar mosaic map with just a few minutes between the captures.

From the NWS:

aIW07NM.jpg

 

The AS2012 map:

wpMAQWH.jpg

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Wow, that's as close as possible I think. Almost a mirror image, looks awesome. 

Hmm may have to make a new weather engine purchase as I'm not happy with what I use, compared to those images.

Thanks for posting.

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6 hours ago, Cactus521 said:

I found it very realistic too.  Radar images match up almost exactly.

John

I agree, I am using AS16 and the RW radar images match up very well with what I can see in the X gauge. I have flown into the eye a few times in the past few days using a CS C-130 to simulate 'Hurricane Hunter' flights and certainly the abrupt drop in wind strength within the eye seems very well modelled.  I did however notice that the winds never seemed to exceed 99kts even within the eye wall although they should have been significantly higher and wondered if this was an AS16 limit? 

Bill

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