Sign in to follow this  
Guest SkyDrift

Will MSFS be next?

Recommended Posts

By JESSICA MINTZSEATTLE (AP) - In-game advertising company Massive Inc. will broker ads for some of Electronic Arts Inc. (ERTS)'s top video games this year, including the upcoming "Madden NFL 08" for Xbox 360 and personal computers.Massive, acquired by software maker Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) last year, said Wednesday it would begin serving dynamic ads to five new EA games - "Madden," plus "Nascar 08,""NHL 08" and "Skate" for Microsoft's Xbox 360, and "Tiger Woods PGA Tour 08" for Xbox and PCs running Microsoft's Windows operating system.New York-based Massive sells virtual billboard space to advertisers, then delivers ads over the Internet to PCs and Xbox 360 game consoles.The company's technology tracks the seconds gamers spend in sight of an ad, then charges marketers for every 10 seconds of exposure. Advertisers can redesign their billboards or stadium ads to match current marketing campaigns in the real world.The company already delivers ads to two lower-profile EA titles, "Need for Speed Carbon" and "Def Jam Icon."Marketers around the world spent just $26.1 million on dynamic in-game advertising in 2006, according to estimates from Yankee Group, but the researchers project that figure will rise to $100 million this year and $645 million in 2010.Cory Van Arsdale, Massive's chief executive, said there is huge interest from marketers looking for ways to reach video games' sweet spot demographic: 18 to 34-year-old males, who, according to JupiterResearch, watch less TV than the average Web-connected American, but make up more than half of console gamers. If so, how will they do it?RH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

A burger king 737 and a Sony airbus 320 along with painted runways with the windows Vista logo and xbox360 advertisements.Would be a bit tacky though so I would assume they'll only slap in billboards on roadways if they do it at all.FS doesn't seem to be a good platform for in game advertising unlike sports games which model real world sports events dripping with commercial saturation.Ian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe Sporty's or Aircraft Spruce painted on the roof of a barn. LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you think about it-Fs has been doing a great job of this for a while. Look at all the rw airlines represented in the sim by 3rd parties vs. the "generic" that come with fs(there was a time the airlines were upset about this!?)-lots of free advertising there. Then the avionics brands sitting in the cockpit-king, garmin etc.A few billboards next to roads and airports would be fine with me and also add a little atmosphere.I have always thought a push could be made with the real world avionics manufacturers/aircraft manufacturers for them to make sim counterparts of their real products. Not only good for their user base to learn to use their product but enticement for those that don't own them yet to use them, see how they work, and get frothed up to buy one!That would be a win/win situation in my book.http://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpgForum Moderatorhttp://geofageofa.spaces.live.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no use for in game billboards taking up yet more CPU / graphics horsepower.We don't have any to spare as it is!Glenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As the billboards would be just one more autogen object type I don't think it would make a difference. We already had the "chicken" fast foods in fs9-changing it to Burger King instead,or having generic buildings have rw company logos on them shouldn't change a thing performance wise. We also have the live billboards presently at Las Vegas in fs.http://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpgForum Moderatorhttp://geofageofa.spaces.live.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When they put those stupid ads in anything, then the anything I will never buy.In-game ads = ugly and tacky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Game development has become so costly and expensive that the in add games maybe the only way to allow continued development of some games. Think about it, FS is maturing and with each release there is less features that can be added to it. So it reasons that MS might be selling less copies with each release. So revenues from a ads might be the difference between justifying a new release and not. Thus I am okay with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having realistic ads limited to comparable real-life locations, e.g. sponsor billboards around a NASCAR track, is not too bad. But there are a couple of possibilities that annoy me:1) You just *know* that after this gets in, advertisers will be demanding more prominent positioning. Already people playing that Rainbow Six FPS game set in Las Vegas are bombarded by bright eyecatching Chrysler ads.2) Tracking of how much time I'm viewing ads, thereby building up a unique personal profile to sell me more stuff.But if you think ads in games are bad, how about the whole Windows operating system becoming an "advertising framework" that dips into your own personal files to determine what ads to show you? This is not fantasy according to a patent that Microsoft has applied for. Check out this article about it: http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070...re-systems.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What they need to do is... Build freeware airport sceneries with lots of bill boards near the airports and give it out.The better the quality of the sceneries more people would use it.;)Manny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well...coke has a high school building on the flight line into seatac that has an entire roof painted with the coca cola logo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

where in vegas are they...what do they say

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting topic...My brother is one of the co-founders of the *other* big in-game advertising company IGA. Truth is there are ads in way, way more games than most people know about. Game development is just too expensive nowadays, so developers look for ways to supplement their income.Let me give you the facts: In game advertising can DOUBLE the revenue a developer gets. Yes, double. Wouldn't you rather have a developer who is around making products than one who no longer exists because he was forced to shutdown after a title that didn't sell as well as hoped?I couldn't care less if they put ads in games. IGA puts ads in lots of games, and of course they are appropriate. Remember, the developer decides where to implement the ads- so they are not going to ruin their game just to put ads in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a lot to think about in this topic.1) Microsoft and EA are not the same. That isn't to say that MS doesn't want a share of advertising, but EA puts out way more game titles than MS does. If you count 3rd party developers for MSFS, then the numbers come closer, but still, EA has their thumb on more popular titles. It makes sense for advertisers to deal with the game publisher rather than the platform publisher the same way that marketing the Intel processor (remember the "Intel Inside" campaign?) worked better than marketing IBM. Still, there's no reason that the big game publishers and the big operating system publishers couldn't work together to deliver us more ads in our games and applications.2) The advertising budget in the article worldwide is slated at $26 million for this year. The cost to develop a top-tier EA title is in that ballpark, at least $20 million. I don't know how much it costs to produce a third-party add-on for MSFS, but I would guess much less than that. Even stuff that gets the Avsim Gold Star, like a TrackIR or a PMDG, products that every single aviation simmer should have in their collection, those things really only sell in the thousands, not the millions. The folks at NaturalPoint aren't swimming in money like EA or MS (although at the last AVSIM Convention, I seem to recall that NaturalPoint Kevin had been strutting around gold-plated and encrusted with jewels, but that was just for one afternoon, not the big banquet, and the gold was only 8kt. I also heard that NaturalPoint had to give the jewels back.) I'm not sure the advertising world would pay much attention to those numbers until they are ready to fill the niches left after the bigger markets are saturated. 3) Realistic repaints of aircraft liveries stem more from a consumer demand to see real world paint jobs, rather than airlines wanting to have their products showcased in MSFS. I am not convinced that real-world companies are ready to jump at the chance to have ham-fisted sim pilots at the controls of aircraft bearing their likeness. Even before the 9/11 tragedy, airlines saw MSFS as a way to showcase crashes. (REM//Insert jokes about Windows crashing here). Real world airlines are incredibly sensitive to media coverage of crashes. I'm not so sure about now in the age of instant news and the Internet that they do this anymore, but they did used to try to paint identifying livery marks and logos off of the remains of crash sites. If you watch a movie on a jet flight, they will edit out airplane crashes, even if it's a central plot point of the film. One minute Harrison Pitt and Gwyneth Alba are wrestling with the damaged controls of Air Force Two, then there's a snip, and suddenly there they are on the ground, clothes torn, hair frowzy, looking all theatrically stained and bloody, going, whew, that was a close one! Then, there was the big deal about Union Pacific threatening to sue the skin off of anyone developing a UP logo for MS Train Simulator, because they thought that Train Sim was a tool to teach people how to start up and run (and crash) trains. Is there enlightenement at the end of the tunnel? Seattle's very own Kenmore Air has stepped up to be the very first commercial airline to be featured in a version of MSFS right out of the box (Check out the FSX Beaver!).Well, these are some of my thoughts. They don't represent any actual position AVSIM.COM may or may not have regarding this topic. I just thought this was an interesting discussion. Jeff ShylukSenior Staff Reviewer, Avsim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure Delta was thrilled when CNN used the FS Lear and a FSX CRJ repaint to "reenact" the Lexington crash.The UP deal was bad timing for Microsoft rather than Train Sim specific. UP had been going after model railroad companies for a couple years before TS was released.Someone had decided their paint schemes and logos could be a major revenue source. They eventually lost that battle - too expensive to keep paying the lawyers to track down everyone.And the unbridled contempt and disgust by real and model railroad fans world wide.I work for a worldwide company with four well known fast food restaurant brands. Soon after FS2004 came out, one of my friends in the company who is a lawyer in the intellectual property team asked me to show them the 'chicken' and another object which kind of looks like one of our trademarked building designs.The lawyers didn't like the similarities, but they could see they didn't have a chance of sustaining a complaint.But there is no way this company would allow anyone in FS to use the company logos and trademarks.They even sent letters to repainters who copied the corporate jet paint schemes back when we used to have brand logos on them.Product placement advertising will come to FS, but it will not be obvious.The very nature of the FS world makes it difficult to expand the placement beyond a custom scenery. Yes you can put signage in Seattle - but how much of the worldwide FS customer base actually flies in Seattle each day?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When billboards are prominent around airports, then they really need to be modelled. Since the real-world ads change quite often, it makes more sense to me to replace them with my own advertising -- in my case, promoting a friend's flightsim product. Much more useful to my customers than promoting some overseas bank.Now if I sold 10 times as many airports, then it may be worthwhile me talking to one of those rich banks...RobinGodzone Virtual Flight, for 'Real New Zealand' sceneryhttp://www.windowlight.co.nz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heh-heh, there's a *slight* conflict between these two parts of your post:>developers look for ways to supplement their income.>In game advertising can DOUBLE the revenue a developer gets. ...and...>the developer are not going to ruin their game just to>put ads in it. It's an insidious thing. A developer might put in a few subtle ads initially. The next game or expansion, hey, we've already got some in place, let's add some more. Once the practice starts, it becomes easier and easier to justify that you're not "ruining the game". Money talks.It's already happening -- for example, the last Need For Speed game I played a few years ago had a bunch of Burger Kings etc scattered around the game world's streets. Not too bad, that sort of thing has been done previously and maybe you can justify it as making the game more "realistic". But in addition to that, incoming game information popped up in a Cingular-branded bubble. Not even appearing on some image of a cell phone that had the brand name on it, you might be able to rationalize that as tied into the game experience, but just as a pop-up dialog box with the brand name plastered on it. Really annoying, blatant pushing of a product. It was the last NFS title I've bought -- not solely because of that, but the annoyance of having that shoved in my face repeatedly certainly influenced my decision.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before I switched to FSX, I flew into Seattle all the time. I used Flytampa's airport and they are already using billboard advertising. Dr. Frasier Crane uses the space to advertise his radio show. Hmm, I think I feel like tuning in.. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nascar of the skys,that would suck.One thing though,didn't you know that Flight Sim is no game..LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting discussion. My 2c:There would be limited interest by advertisers in "static" advertising - i.e objects that come packaged as part of the product, mainly because there would be limited ways to track the effectiveness of the ad (return on their investment)But there would be interested in in "dynamic" advertising. You can download dynamic weather today, so I see no reason why the FS architecture could not be expanded to include other downloadable content, including advertising. There is no reason why the advertising has to be in-flight. Imagine the option to download free aircraft, aircraft repaints, scenery, etc. (or equivalent content for TrainSim) from within FSX - but you have to watch an advertisement first. This already happens in another context today when you want to view certain video content on-line: You get an ad, flollowed by the video. So, would you be willing to watch a 60 second ad in a window populated with other clickable ads (that would open up your web browser to that advertisers site) to get a more accrurate representation of an airport, or get a new mission, or a new AI aircraft, new station, new train, new set of wagons or carriages, etc... Most of the technology already exists - it just has to be packaged in the product- regards, SkyDrift

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this