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oldbear

Knocking off Autothrottle on approach..

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When I'm set up on approach I like to land manually. But I find that when I disconnect the A/T and then touch the throttle slider on my joystick it takes a while to get the right power setting, by which time I've destabilised my approach. What's the best way to get a seamless transfer from the aircraft holding the speed with A/T and going to the manual throttle on the joystick? It's not just the NGX of course, but that's all I'm flying these days and I love it. At present I'm going manual at 2,000 ft or so, to give me time to get settled, but I'd like to be able to disconnect the AP and A/T at minimums sometimes. Is there a 'right place' to put the throttle slider after hitting TOGA on take-off, so it's ready for approach? I'm assuming that in real life the pilots are more skilled at quickly finding the precise power setting after they've knocked off the A/T? Hope that makes sense, and thanks for any suggestions. Ian

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In the FMC Options menu (I believe under Simulation) there's an option to turn on a blue line (Show Thrust Lever Position) that will show on the Engine Displays where exactly your physical throttle is without you having to turn off autothrottle. Match the blue line with the white line, disconnect, and you should be good to go.


James Lunsford

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that is a very handy option, when rw pilots disconnect I imagine the throttles maintain the current thrust setting so there is no major change


Wayne such

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On CDU goto PMDG Setup, options, simulation, 2nd page "Show Thrust Lever POS" Set to yes now you'll get blue markers on the where your throttle is on your joystick versus the virtual throttle. Line these up before you disengage auto throttle for a smooth transition. :) thrust.jpg


Cory Elsenpeter

pmdgngxpilot.png

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In the real aircraft, it isn't an issue, simply because the thrust levers move in accordance with autothrust changes. The levers are always in the right place. Unlike Airbus of course, where the thrust levers remain in the autothrust detent. Martin Wilby

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In the real aircraft, it isn't an issue, simply because the thrust levers move in accordance with autothrust changes. The levers are always in the right place. Unlike Airbus of course, where the thrust levers remain in the autothrust detent. Martin Wilby
yup, but in the bus we ALWAYS have an indication of the TLA (thrus lever angle) ... so to disco auto thrust on the bus we simply first slide the throttles back to the current N1 setting, then disco the auto thrust... et voila easy stuff!

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I have a Logitech G940 flight system, with to seperate throttle sliders. It seems that the blue line that represents the hardware position does not work with a dual trhottle system.. Not in my case anyway. Each time I move the sliders, I override the A/T, even though I have selected Never in the A/T override options via the fmc.


Anders Weber 

 

ATPL(A) Student

EKBI - Billund, Denmark

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to get speed down I disconnect autothrottle and go manual and if I am up at around 15,000 ft and going about 300 i go to idle. and then worst comes to worst I use the speedbrakes.

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yup, but in the bus we ALWAYS have an indication of the TLA (thrus lever angle) ... so to disco auto thrust on the bus we simply first slide the throttles back to the current N1 setting, then disco the auto thrust... et voila easy stuff!
Again, the difference in philosophy between Airbus and Boeing is evident. Boeing keeps their throttles moving in accordance to the AT commands, so in case of an emergency, the pilot can just grab the throttles and firewall them. Anyways, on topic: I really like this "blue arc" option. Just makes things easier. Also, I noticed i don't see the blue arc when AT is in "ARM" mode, on descent. Did anyone noticed that?

Cristi Neagu

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yup, but in the bus we ALWAYS have an indication of the TLA (thrus lever angle) ... so to disco auto thrust on the bus we simply first slide the throttles back to the current N1 setting, then disco the auto thrust... et voila easy stuff!
Yes I know! I'm i'm a fan of Airbus, all aircraft would be flt-by-wire and made by Airbus if I hade my way. Martin Wilby

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Again, the difference in philosophy between Airbus and Boeing is evident. Boeing keeps their throttles moving in accordance to the AT commands, so in case of an emergency, the pilot can just grab the throttles and firewall them. Anyways, on topic: I really like this "blue arc" option. Just makes things easier. Also, I noticed i don't see the blue arc when AT is in "ARM" mode, on descent. Did anyone noticed that?
not to start an airbus vs boeing thing here but your comment is rather... ehm...anyhow, in the airbus whenever you move the levers out of CLB detent forward you put the auto thrust into ARMED mode and command thrust to that TLA setting. (so slamming the levers to TOGA will ALWAYS give you max available power ... kinda the same, right? ;) )(if you move them below CLB detent with auto thrust active what you do is limiting the maximum thrust you allow the auto thrust to use, so imagine max climb thrust is 88%N1 and you reduce the TLA a bit below the CLB detent, you are restricting auto thrust to say 84%N1, auto thrust will then obey this limitation, however this is an uncommon procedure and will cause caution messages to pop up on the ECAM...) cheerzPS: NO pun intended!!!

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Again, the difference in philosophy between Airbus and Boeing is evident. Boeing keeps their throttles moving in accordance to the AT commands, so in case of an emergency, the pilot can just grab the throttles and firewall them. Anyways, on topic: I really like this "blue arc" option. Just makes things easier. Also, I noticed i don't see the blue arc when AT is in "ARM" mode, on descent. Did anyone noticed that?
On the Airbus there's absolutely no difference. If you want maximum thrust put the throttles in the TOGA detent. Kevin Hall Edit. I see LZaman beat me to it.

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I have a Logitech G940 flight system, with to seperate throttle sliders. It seems that the blue line that represents the hardware position does not work with a dual trhottle system.. Not in my case anyway. Each time I move the sliders, I override the A/T, even though I have selected Never in the A/T override options via the fmc.
Hmmm, I know if I calibrate my throttles using FSUIPC, they always override the A/T no matter what, is this your issue as well?

James Lunsford

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not to start an airbus vs boeing thing here but your comment is rather... ehm...
Yeah... sorry about that.. I posted without realizing where it might lead. I hate Airbus vs Boeing rants (and for that matter Microsoft vs Apple, PS3 vs XBox, Canon vs Nikon, etc.) Also, I'm not really that well versed into Airbus systems, so i guess i was wrong. Too much automation for my taste...

Cristi Neagu

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