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JLuis

Learjet 35A - Autopilot video request.

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Hi! Folks,

 

I would like to request to you a video teaching how use autopilot correctly in Flysimware Learjet 35A.

 

I think with the video is more easy to learn.

 

Thanks,

 

Jose Luis

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I agree. I would like to see a video of takeoff and climb too, this jet is like a rocket, its hard to take over it when it departes. I am coming from the NGX, maybe my head thinks in Boeing's logic, but I struggle to fly this jet.

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You are the "auto throttle" as the gear and flaps come up and accelerating you have to reduce the thrust to maintain airspace speed limits.Practice a departure with a short climb to say 3000 feet initially while maintaining 200kts until level off with a shallow climb.When you reach 3000 accelerate to 250kts. What approximate N1 setting gave you those speeds in the climb and level off? That will give you some basic settings to work from on your initial take off and keep it a smooth and controlled departure.

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Yes, would love to see some good video tutorials for the Learjet similar to what they did for the MU-2.

Also, when flying the Lear do you want the option clicked for true airspeed or indicated, my understanding for most GA you use
true airspeed, but for faster aircraft like the Lear you use indicated ??

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I've had the plane for awhile and I just love it.   Its one of the relatively few FS birds I've had that

has me interested enough to commit to really learning it.  

 

I'm still in the phase of learning to hand fly it.    I've just about gotten the hang of that, and will then

move on to practicing IMC flying.    I've not as yet gotten to the autopilot phase of my "training" program,

as I strongly feel that gaining true proficiency with any new FS airplane I purchase (particularly one as

complex and as overpowered as this one) starts with understanding the fundamentals of hand flying it.

 

Takeoffs with this bird are indeed a challenge.   The Lear can get away from you easily unless you're on

your toes.   You have to be right on top of the power reduction schedule or you'll be busting the 250

knot limit before you know it.    It also wants badly to climb.    I've found it to be routine, even with the

trim set properly, to be doing 4000+ fpm seconds after I'm airborne, especially at the relatively light 

gross weight that I practice at.

 

Closely managing the fan (N1) speed is part of the ticket.   No sooner than you're airborne and the

gear is up, you should immediately get that N1 speed to under 70%.  If you want to keep it at under

3000 fpm closer to 60% is better.  In no time you'll be at 200 kts.   Make sure that the flaps are up

by then.   I've found that the Lear will easily climb at 3000 fpm, and will continue to accelerate, in

the neighborhood of 60-65% fan speed.     Mind you' I've been flying it at no more than the maximum

landing weight to facilitate pattern work. 

 

At the same time you have to be on the trim and putting forward pressure on the yoke immediately

after you quit the ground, unless the initial altitude that you're looking for is well above 3000-4000 agl.   

 

If you plan, after initial climb out, to level off below 10000 feet it's also essential to plan ahead, and get

your N1 speed to the neighborhood of 50-60% (depending on your gross weight) by the time you've stopped

your climb.   Otherwise she'll blow through 250 knots before you know it.

 

The airfield that I've been practicing from is in the neighborhood of 700' msl.   To really challenge

myself in getting a handle on the Lear I've practiced takeoffs at 98% N1, at only 14,300 lbs gross,

with the goal of leveling off at 2000' msl and at under 250 kts.    It's a handful, but It can be done.

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As with all aircraft, especially high performance a/c - you really have to stay ahead of the a/c. If you get behind - you are in trouble.

 

Get your flight set up - get desired altitude in the selector and your frequencies properly set.

 

Take off - rotate at correct speed for your load - gear up - reduce throttle - manually establish your rate of climb and click ENG to engage the AP - click ALT SEL to arm the altitude and click VS to lock your rate of climb. You can click NAV to follow your GPS course, it will show NAC ARM until it locks to GPS then show NAV CAP. That's it - all you have to do now is watch your airspeed - the AP will follow the GPS course and the a/c will climb and level off at the desired altitude. You will see the VS and ALT SEL lights go out and the ALT HOLD light come on.

 

Note - it is possible that, if you take off heading away from your GPS course line, the AP will not lock on it - pay attention - if you are heading away from the GPS course and the a/c doesn't seem to be turning toward it - manually fly in the direction of the course line and the AP will pick it up.

 

It's really an easy AP to get the hang of one you realize it's limitations.

 

Vic

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Also, when flying the Lear do you want the option clicked for true airspeed or indicated, my understanding for most GA you use

true airspeed, but for faster aircraft like the Lear you use indicated ??

 

Always use indicated airspeed as your in flight reference, all operating speeds are based on that.TAS is used in flight planning. Does not matter if you are in a Cessna or a Lear, same applies.

 

 

Take off - rotate at correct speed for your load - gear up - reduce throttle - manually establish your rate of climb and click ENG to engage the AP - click ALT SEL to arm the altitude and click VS to lock your rate of climb.

 

All initial climb references are based on an V speed (V2 for example in event of an engine failure) Airspeed or Mach is the correct reference for climb using the AFCS unless you are interested in unintended low speed buffet recovery practice at high altitude.The Lear 35 climb schedule was 250KT (or better if able) until transitioning to.72 mach for the remainder of the climb.The aircraft will not be able to maintain a VS rate the higher you climb, you fly the speed and accept the rate of climb you get for the conditions.

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Always use indicated airspeed as your in flight reference, all operating speeds are based on that.TAS is used in flight planning. Does not matter if you are in a Cessna or a Lear, same applies.

 

 

All initial climb references are based on an V speed (V2 for example in event of an engine failure) Airspeed or Mach is the correct reference for climb using the AFCS unless you are interested in unintended low speed buffet recovery practice at high altitude.The Lear 35 climb schedule was 250KT (or better if able) until transitioning to.72 mach for the remainder of the climb.The aircraft will not be able to maintain a VS rate the higher you climb, you fly the speed and accept the rate of climb you get for the conditions.

LOL! You are correct, I was trying to keep it simple for the OP - I thought getting into V speeds and mach transition might be too much info.

 

Vic

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+1 for the video....  

 

Its good to learn this way(Forums, manuals) but a video about this incredible jet would be excellent.   I see many experts around...   :wink:

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Finally it happened:

 

Learjet 35A - Autopilot video

 

 

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Hey everyone,

 

I'll try to make a takeoff video in the next week or so demonstrating how we manage the airplane in real life. The simplest way to explain it is that you have to constantly stay a few steps ahead of the airplane. This is true in any airplane, but things happen quickly in the Lear and you need to be on top of things.

 

One thing of importance is the pitch attitude you establish for your initial climb out. It is common to pitch up to 17-20 degrees. The order goes something like this for a flaps 8 departure, which is the most common flap setting:

 

-Set takeoff power

-Rotate at calculated Vr

-Get the gear up within a few seconds of rotation (positive rate of climb will be obvious  :smile: )

-Through 170KIAS, flaps up

-Reduce power at or slightly before reaching 200 knots

-Lower the nose

-Further reduce power as necessary

 

 

Obviously, you may have to adjust everything after flap retraction to comply with DP's

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Very nice news! Joe...

 

We wait anxiously...

 

Thanks for the videos.

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I've been having a lot of fun with this aircraft. But I was wondering if the developer can add to show "info text" on the airspeed indicator. On the kneeboard it says the Never Exceed Mach is .73. What will the typical cruise speed be?

With this information I can manage better my cruise speed.

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