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Rockliffe

Serious help needed

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I have been flying with my current machine for about five four years now. It is an Asus p8z68-v MB with an Intel i5 SB2600 Gpu, overclocked to 4.6Ghz with watercooling, separate SSD drives and a GTX 770 4Gb card. For some time now I have been experiencing the odd freeze and blue screen. It's a bummer because up until about 6 months ago it was as stable as a rock and I was experiencing little or no issues such as these. Recently it has become more frequent, and this week I was on a flight and the whole sim began to stutter dreadfully and drop frames into single figures. Then on another flight the whole sim just froze. After rebooting I noticed that the overclock had returned to the default of 3.3Ghz. This is very strange as I have not made any such changes. I then decided to go into the bios. This proved impossible as I could not access the bios in the normal way by hitting delete on startup. This has always worked in the past. Now I have to persist to actually get the PC to start. The entire machine seems to be getting worse and worse to the point now where I cannot boot into Windows. It has been suggested to me by my computer guru that he suspects the motherboard has taken a dive. Can anyone offer an opinion?

 

If it appears the MB is at fault, then I have two options, replace the current setup with like for like, or upgrade to a different and improved MB and CPU. If I do the latter, is there any way of moving my Acronis backup of Windows and FSX back onto a brand new Windows install? Or will I have to start afresh? Which if that is the case I may consider calling it a day rather than spend 3-4 weeks of reinstalling!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Symptoms like this can have many causes, so difficult to be definitive. As usual it's a process of elimination.

 

It must be remembered though that it's not unusual for an overclock to become unstable in time. It may have been a rock solid overclock initially, but that doesn't mean it is now. For that reason, I would reset the CMOS. Then see if you can access the BIOS. If you can, then leave the system with no overclock and test.

 

The usual checks should be applied. CPU temp under load, GPU temp under load, PSU tested with a PSU tester or multimeter, hard drives checked with something like Crystal Disk Info, trying one stick of RAM at a time and in different slots. Check motherboard for ant loose connections and for any dodgy looking capacitors. Check PSU cables, especially the ATX cable for scorched pins.

 

If the sim dropped to low frame rate then it may have been due to the CPU throttling back, Freezing can occur for the same reason, so.... do check your CPU temp under load!

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Howard I just went through a very similar ordeal where my OC stopped working and all sorts of blue screen dramas . I eventually asked for advice at the ROG forums and was told to clear the CMOS memory on the actual mobo and then reflash the bios and it worked

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/131623/how-to-clear-your-computers-cmos-to-reset-bios-settings/

 

page 2 of your mobo manual

 

https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P8Z68V/HelpDesk_Manual/

 

edit

Just saw martin above posted the same

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I had a similar story after 2 years of stability on a OC'd processor : cpu started to overheat.

Removed ventirad, cleaned processor with nail polish remover, put some new paste and mounted everything back in order, and voilà !

 

Looks like your cpu has overheated, or has lost OC stability over time. That happens !

If I were you,I'd slow the OC a bit to the 4.3-4.4 range and run some tests again. If it gets stable, chances are your processor is getting old. I know my 3820 can't OC as fast as it used to.

 

I noticed that the overclock had returned to the default of 3.3Ghz. This is very strange as I have not made any such changes.

 

Actually that is a safety feature when processor is unstable.

Most if not all BIOS does that to allow the system to boot again when processor is unstable.

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What sort of CPU temperatures are you getting? High temps can cause processor throttling and other intermittent problems. If checking the CPU cooler/fans and re-seating it on the CPU doesn't help, it may be worth looking at the PSU. The components in power supplies do deteriorate over time and can cause many seemingly unrelated problems even with good quality units.

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Thanks for all the advice fellas, very much appreciated. I have to admit that I too was thinking it may be the CPU. I have already reset the CMOS manually, but at the moment it still refuses to boot into the BIOS.  ???

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Thanks for all the advice fellas, very much appreciated. I have to admit that I too was thinking it may be the CPU. I have already reset the CMOS manually, but at the moment it still refuses to boot into the BIOS.  ???

 

 

EDIT. Yup, stuck here with the darn thing refusing to boot into BIOS. I have tried the CMOS button and also removing the small lithium battery.

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You probably know but the PC should be off at the wall, and the CMOS button pressed for 5-10 seconds. I would go for 10.

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Thanks Martin. Looks like I may have found the culprit. I discovered by a search on the web that it could have been the keyboard. After trying a  different keyboard in a different usb port, it allowed me to enter the BIOS! Clearly there was a fault with it. I was banging away time after time on the del button with nothing happening! I have now gone into the OC part of the BIOS and changed the OC from 4.6 down to 4.4. The voltage is left as it was and tomorrow I will do some temp tests. Any opinions fellas?

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I still think that the CPU/cooler (temperature, re-seat) then PSU is the way to go.

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Yup been there some older motherboards require serial keyboard to get in - real pain - glad those days are over 

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Some thermal pastes tend to dry up. I've seen it several times. I would try that first.

 

Hopefully you aren't starting to suffer from electromigration, if it is your OC will get less and less and eventually you will not be able to use the CPU anymore even at stock speeds. 

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I've seen my Asus mobo reset its CPU and RAM settings if it hit difficulty during the POST of the bios.  For me this happened when I goofed up on my ram speed; all clocks got set to default.  Just for completeness, you might consider running a memory diag too.  Windows 7 has a built in ram test, or use memtest86 to really wring out any ram issues.

 

Something else to toss out there:  with a whole new build it may be possible to boot it using your old system's boot drive.  I've done that as an accident.  I put an old winXP system drive into a totally new build to pull some files off and inadvertently booted the new system with it.  It seem to work fine, I had not seen that desktop in several months.  The only issue was windows was unhappy with the license and I had only a limited number of days to fix it.  The major surprise was that the winXP computer was an AMD 4200+ X2 and the new an intel i7 860.  I didn't bother pushing it any with new drivers but I don't see why that would not be possible.  If something like that could really work in the long run, your currently existing FSX drive(s) could be mounted with their original letters and ta-da...every is there as you left it, ready to use, without any reinstall.  If anyone has good darts to throw at this please do...I want to know about this as well.

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Interesting. Thanks for all the help and advice fellas, appreciated.

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That's great news Howard. May have been as I said perhaps, simply an overclock that became unstable over time. I've seen it before. Sometimes when you are already on the edge of stability and don't realise it. A minor reduction in the CPU's capabilities, a natural factor as a CPU ages, nudges the CPU into an unstable state. A good reason why Five Way Optimisation from Asus adds a tad more voltage than purely a stable voltage.

 

I would reset everything to default. Absolutely no overclock. Then run something like ROG RealBence to test for stability at stock settings. As most of us that responded have said, check the CPU temp under load, just in case there was a throttling issue at play.

 

If all good, then rethink your overclock, taking the same steps you would with any overclock. 

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That's great news Howard. May have been as I said perhaps, simply an overclock that became unstable over time. I've seen it before. Sometimes when you are already on the edge of stability and don't realise it. A minor reduction in the CPU's capabilities, a natural factor as a CPU ages, nudges the CPU into an unstable state. A good reason why Five Way Optimisation from Asus adds a tad more voltage than purely a stable voltage.

 

I would reset everything to default. Absolutely no overclock. Then run something like ROG RealBence to test for stability at stock settings. As most of us that responded have said, check the CPU temp under load, just in case there was a throttling issue at play.

 

If all good, then rethink your overclock, taking the same steps you would with any overclock. 

:smile:  :wink:

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The above are good suggestions.

 

One thing that many people overlook is power supplies act as a sort of "shock absorber" for your computer and over time they wear out - to put it simply.

 

A faulty power supply will cause all of the issues you listed, and can kill your computer.  Your PSU should be replaced at least every five years, especially for overclocking.  If you replace the power supply purchase the highest quality you can afford.  For example, I use a Seasonic 660 watt Platinum Series.  Many people argue that an 80 PLUS rating of Platinum is more than needed, however, with overclocking for years at a time you should use the best you can afford.

 

I understand the differences in PSUs, I became an expert in computer hardware, owned my own company, and became a consultant to other companies including those that build computers.

 

I am not saying I am perfect or at God level, however, my experience is vast and very long.  And, I have been overclocking for decades, I initially did it to break hardware in order to find tolerances, now that I am disabled I cannot afford to go that far.

 

I suggest you increase the voltage of your RAM + 2/100 of a volt and increase your voltage on your CPU very slightly.  Also, applying a good TIM on your CPU is a good idea [clean the old off completely],  I still use GELID GC-EXTREME, because it is very good and I have a tube sitting on a shelf in my computer room, although there are a couple of compounds that conduct heat VERY slightly better, I do not expect to change compounds any time soon. 

 

NOTE:  Store the tube of TIM with the tip down, the "oil" or emulsifier has a tendency to migrate to the tip over time if the tube is on it's side, and when you use it after a period of storage time you will get an oily substance before the TIM itself leaves the tube. 

 

These are just a few things important to situations such as yours, including overclocking and I wanted to give you a little history of myself, and wish you good luck on getting your computer running well.

 

EDITED for clarity.

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Your PSU should be replaced at least every five years

 

 

 

Not true that a PSU needs to be replaced "at least" every 5 years. For example Corsair PSU's now have a 10 year warranty. Scrapping a quality PSU and replacing it when it's only half way through it's warranty period would be silly.

 

 

Many people argue that an 80 PLUS rating of Platinum is more than needed, however, with overclocking for years at a time you should use the best you can afford.

 

 

 

80 Plus, Gold, or Platinum is the "efficiency" of the PSU, and it doesn't necessarily relate to the expected lifespan of the PSU. A less efficient PSU, whether you are overclocking or not, on average, wont have a shorter lifespan than a higher efficiency Platinum rated PSU. It will just generate somewhat more heat, and if the PSU is properly specified and not running at max capacity and cooled correctly it's not an issue.

 

A PSU with a lesser efficiency rating isn't a PSU of lesser quality.

 

It's the "quality" of the PSU, the quality of the components, the design choices made by the manufacturer that determines PSU lifespan. Not it's efficiency rating.

 

Furthermore, manufacturers frequently have to make PSU design compromises to achieve a Platinum rating. Thus some have argued that lesser Gold efficiency rated PSU's are more likely to have a longer lifespan.

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The above are good suggestions.

 

One thing that many people overlook is power supplies act as a sort of "shock absorber" for your computer and over time they wear out - to put it simply.

 

A faulty power supply will cause all of the issues you listed, and can kill your computer.  Your PSU should be replaced at least every five years, especially for overclocking.  If you replace the power supply purchase the highest quality you can afford.  For example, I use a Seasonic 660 watt Platinum Series.  Many people argue that an 80 PLUS rating of Platinum is more than needed, however, with overclocking for years at a time you should use the best you can afford.

 

I understand the differences in PSUs, I became an expert in computer hardware, owned my own company, and became a consultant to other companies including those that build computers.

 

I am not saying I am perfect or at God level, however, my experience is vast and very long.  And, I have been overclocking for decades, I initially did it to break hardware in order to find tolerances, now that I am disabled I cannot afford to go that far.

 

I suggest you increase the voltage of your RAM + 2/100 of a volt and increase your voltage on your CPU very slightly.  Also, applying a good TIM on your CPU is a good idea [clean the old off completely],  I still use GELID GC-EXTREME, because it is very good and I have a tube sitting on a shelf in my computer room, although there are a couple of compounds that conduct heat VERY slightly better, I do not expect to change compounds any time soon. 

 

NOTE:  Store the tube of TIM with the tip down, the "oil" or emulsifier has a tendency to migrate to the tip over time if the tube is on it's side, and when you use it after a period of storage time you will get an oily substance before the TIM itself leaves the tube. 

 

These are just a few things important to situations such as yours, including overclocking and I wanted to give you a little history of myself, and wish you good luck on getting your computer running well.

 

EDITED for clarity.

 

Not true that a PSU needs to be replaced "at least" every 5 years. For example Corsair PSU's now have a 10 year warranty. Scrapping a quality PSU and replacing it when it's only half way through it's warranty period would be silly.

 

 

 

 

80 Plus, Gold, or Platinum is the "efficiency" of the PSU, and it doesn't necessarily relate to the expected lifespan of the PSU. A less efficient PSU, whether you are overclocking or not, on average, wont have a shorter lifespan than a higher efficiency Platinum rated PSU. It will just generate somewhat more heat, and if the PSU is properly specified and not running at max capacity and cooled correctly it's not an issue.

 

A PSU with a lesser efficiency rating isn't a PSU of lesser quality.

 

It's the "quality" of the PSU, the quality of the components, the design choices made by the manufacturer that determines PSU lifespan. Not it's efficiency rating.

 

Furthermore, manufacturers frequently have to make PSU design compromises to achieve a Platinum rating. Thus some have argued that lesser Gold efficiency rated PSU's are more likely to have a longer lifespan.

 

Thanks for the advice Dan and Martin, appreciated.

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martin,

 

Some of your comments, such as, "A PSU with a lesser efficiency rating isn't a PSU of lesser quality."  For the vast majority of PSUs your statement is false.  I will not address the rest of your comments because this post will be longer than I wanted and I do not want to add to it.

 

Also, it may be that I should have been more specific, for some people.  I spoke in general terms because most computer users have no idea of the importance of a power supply and what its components or sub-components are, let alone understand what terms such as ripple or what a sine wave or stepped sine wave is in regards to PSUs.

 

www.jonnyguru.com is a great site, especially for novice and moderately educated computer users, and it is useful for the highly educated to keep up on some hardware.

 

Usually I do not precisely specify what my hardware is because there are so many good choices available.  Because you feel you have a good or better understanding of computer hardware, my PSU is a Seasonic SS-660XP Active PFC F3 (Platinum-660).  A review of it can be found here:  http://jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story&reid=326

 

I have been active with computer software and, more so, hardware since 1986, I became highly educated in the computer hardware field, owned my own company, and became a computer consultant to other companies.  Also, I picked up the desire to overclock long ago, so, that is also familiar to me.

 

Of course no one is perfect, and I am not saying that I am, however I do try to provide good advice on forums in the most concise manner to keep the length of posts down.  It is not my intent to provide in-depth hardware specifics because I do not want to write a short book or lengthy reviews, it takes too long and most people do not want to read massive posts.

 

Thank you for your comments.

 

Dan

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Some of your comments, such as, "A PSU with a lesser efficiency rating isn't a PSU of lesser quality."  For the vast majority of PSUs your statement is false.  I will not address the rest of your comments because this post will be longer than I wanted and I do not want to add to it.

 

His point remains valid - if you want a good power supply, start with a reputable, quality brand and then select the wattage and efficiency you desire or need. Anything else, while possibly giving you good results is not a good method especially when a better one is easily available.

 

Your own choice reinforces it - I run with a Seasonic as well and started with the brand, then the wattage.

 

I have been active with computer software and, more so, hardware since 1986, I became highly educated in the computer hardware field, owned my own company, and became a computer consultant to other companies.  Also, I picked up the desire to overclock long ago, so, that is also familiar to me.

 

I'm not sure what the point of that is - I've been involved with personal computers for longer (1982 and built my first 6501-based computer on a breadboard in 1988) but it's not a particularly useful comparison. If you're an Electrical Engineer who designs and/or specs power supplies for a living (preferably for a major manufacturer or custom hardware builder a la Google/FB) then it would be a somewhat useful appeal to authority. If not, then you (like me) are one-eyed men among the land of the blind.

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

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Some of your comments, such as, "A PSU with a lesser efficiency rating isn't a PSU of lesser quality." For the vast majority of PSUs your statement is false.

 

I'm with Martin on this one. A quick look around eBay pops up plently of no-name 80+ Platinum PSUs at suspiciously low prices. Are you really saying that they're better than a Seasonic/Corsair/EVGA 80+ Bronze item? I'd much rather have a Bronze PSU with a 10-year warranty than a Platinum one with a 1-year (or less!) warranty.

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Hello Luke,

 

Quote, "His point remains valid..." I disagree. Quote, "...if you want a good power supply, start with a reputable, quality brand and then select the wattage and efficiency you desire or need." I agree with that.

 

It is obvious you are missing my point, and I would have to go into detail to explain why, and even then I am not sure I could get my thought process across to you, although I believe you are trying your best to provide good information.

 

Power supplies came up because of the devastating situation stated in the first post made by the OP. Because I cannot get my hands on his machine to check things I can only make assumptions as to a fix, just like everyone else here.

 

According to the OP he has been running a stable overclock of 4.6GHz on water for around 5 years. I do not know what settings he has in BIOS to accomplish this, he did not state it, if he did, I missed or forgot it. A good CPU will last that long easily.

 

His CPU has 12 phases, and they are all needed because they are not the highest quality, however, 12 of them should do the job.

 

Also, I do not know what TIM he is using or how old it is, how the CPU and cooler were prepped for TIM, and how the TIM was applied. I do not know what kind of RAM he is using or what voltage it is running. I do not know what voltages the CPU is using. I do not know if anything needs cleaned - as dirty components trap heat.

 

These are just a few of the things important to a moderately high overclock such as his. The power supply quality and health comes into play because weak components in a power supply can force computer components, including the PSU to demand more power to function, which increases heat, and with heat more power is required in order to supply proper voltage. It can become very dangerous and a faulty power supply can damage any other component in the computer, from drives to the motherboard. A very high quality power supply has better components and is less prone to weaken under stress compared to lower quality components in lower quality PSUs.

 

I suggest he try some free things first. Remove all overclocks. Disconnect all cables, CAT, sound, microphone, USB [keep only the keyboard and mouse connected [although I have seen a defective keyboard or mouse, usually the keyboard cause problems]. Disconnect all fans except the CPU fan. Disconnect and remove the video card, all drives, and RAM.

 

Try booting and check the response of the computer. If the computer responds properly add one stick of RAM, reboot and check for proper response. Reinstall the video card, if the computer responds properly connect the boot drive. If the computer boots into Windows properly and there are no problems with programs located on the boot drive, move the single stick of RAM to each different RAM slot. If everything works properly, including Windows programs, add the second stick of RAM. If everything works properly plug in one fan at a time. Go slowly with this, as ANYTHING can cause damage to computer components, including a bad fan. I have seen a fan that was shorting out do damage to other components in computers.

 

If you run into any problem along the way, isolate it and see if your computer is stable while not overclocked. If the computer is stable, begin a slow overclock starting around 4.0GHz and increase the CPU VCORE by .025 volts above what you normally use and increase the RAM voltage the same amount, keep this increased voltage all the way up to 4.6GHz overclock. If just the voltage increases stabilize your computer components such as the CPU, VRM, RAM or RAM circuits, including controller, on the motherboard may be getting weak.

 

Again, a failing power supply will cause problems that can destroy components and make diagnosing problems so difficult it may make you want to chuck the computer out of a second story window.

 

I have not covered everything hardware related, there is also software that can destroy or interfere with computer functions. I do not know what, including software, was added by the OP or hacker over the internet, or any other changes to the computer just prior to this problem.

 

It is nearly 10:00 p.m. here and I am getting very tired. I take medication at 7:30 p.m. that interferes with my ability to focus and think. Another major hindrance to me, I was wounded in the head twice during combat and that caused memory problems and a leaning disability that made it extremely difficult for me in college, however, by "over-studying", a great deal I became able to do many things in my life, although it was exceedingly difficult. In high school I took advanced subjects and when entering the U.S. army I was qualified to become anything I wanted, and was given a choice, even though the Vietnam War was at it's height, 1968 and 1969. More American deaths occurred in that time period than any other. In any event, after a great deal of combat and wounds, I fought hard to learn and as mentioned I owned a computer business and was a computer consultant.

 

The reason I like FSX is because I also became a commercial pilot, fixed wing. Many of my flights are to places that I actually flew to in real life.

 

I was also what the navy calls a Mustang, a person that climbed through the ranks and was very successful in commanding ground forces. And, I did other things that doctors were later amazed that I had accomplished because I had a very serious problem, and I do not think the massive amounts of Agent Orange dumped in my AO in Viet Nam helped any, more was used in and around my AO than any other place.

 

My war wounds eventually became crushing because as I aged I did not have the energy to expend in order to excel at my work, and then it got to the point that I could no longer be at a normal capability level. That is more than enough, I usually do not talk about myself, however, I felt that giving you a little information may better understand me. To impart some of my lingering knowledge I still try to help people with computer problems at different forums from time to time.

 

Dan

vortex,

 

I have already stated that I use a Seasonic Platinum series PSU and provided a link to a review of it by www.jonnyguru.com

 

Please read all of my posts - carefully before respond.

 

Thank you.

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Hello Luke,

 

Quote, "His point remains valid..." I disagree. Quote, "...if you want a good power supply, start with a reputable, quality brand and then select the wattage and efficiency you desire or need." I agree with that.

 

It is obvious you are missing my point, and I would have to go into detail to explain why, and even then I am not sure I could get my thought process across to you, although I believe you are trying your best to provide good information.

 

Power supplies came up because of the devastating situation stated in the first post made by the OP. Because I cannot get my hands on his machine to check things I can only make assumptions as to a fix, just like everyone else here.

 

According to the OP he has been running a stable overclock of 4.6GHz on water for around 5 years. I do not know what settings he has in BIOS to accomplish this, he did not state it, if he did, I missed or forgot it. A good CPU will last that long easily.

 

His CPU has 12 phases, and they are all needed because they are not the highest quality, however, 12 of them should do the job.

 

Also, I do not know what TIM he is using or how old it is, how the CPU and cooler were prepped for TIM, and how the TIM was applied. I do not know what kind of RAM he is using or what voltage it is running. I do not know what voltages the CPU is using. I do not know if anything needs cleaned - as dirty components trap heat.

 

These are just a few of the things important to a moderately high overclock such as his. The power supply quality and health comes into play because weak components in a power supply can force computer components, including the PSU to demand more power to function, which increases heat, and with heat more power is required in order to supply proper voltage. It can become very dangerous and a faulty power supply can damage any other component in the computer, from drives to the motherboard. A very high quality power supply has better components and is less prone to weaken under stress compared to lower quality components in lower quality PSUs.

 

I suggest he try some free things first. Remove all overclocks. Disconnect all cables, CAT, sound, microphone, USB [keep only the keyboard and mouse connected [although I have seen a defective keyboard or mouse, usually the keyboard cause problems]. Disconnect all fans except the CPU fan. Disconnect and remove the video card, all drives, and RAM.

 

Try booting and check the response of the computer. If the computer responds properly add one stick of RAM, reboot and check for proper response. Reinstall the video card, if the computer responds properly connect the boot drive. If the computer boots into Windows properly and there are no problems with programs located on the boot drive, move the single stick of RAM to each different RAM slot. If everything works properly, including Windows programs, add the second stick of RAM. If everything works properly plug in one fan at a time. Go slowly with this, as ANYTHING can cause damage to computer components, including a bad fan. I have seen a fan that was shorting out do damage to other components in computers.

 

If you run into any problem along the way, isolate it and see if your computer is stable while not overclocked. If the computer is stable, begin a slow overclock starting around 4.0GHz and increase the CPU VCORE by .025 volts above what you normally use and increase the RAM voltage the same amount, keep this increased voltage all the way up to 4.6GHz overclock. If just the voltage increases stabilize your computer components such as the CPU, VRM, RAM or RAM circuits, including controller, on the motherboard may be getting weak.

 

Again, a failing power supply will cause problems that can destroy components and make diagnosing problems so difficult it may make you want to chuck the computer out of a second story window.

 

I have not covered everything hardware related, there is also software that can destroy or interfere with computer functions. I do not know what, including software, was added by the OP or hacker over the internet, or any other changes to the computer just prior to this problem.

 

It is nearly 10:00 p.m. here and I am getting very tired. I take medication at 7:30 p.m. that interferes with my ability to focus and think. Another major hindrance to me, I was wounded in the head twice during combat and that caused memory problems and a leaning disability that made it extremely difficult for me in college, however, by "over-studying", a great deal I became able to do many things in my life, although it was exceedingly difficult. In high school I took advanced subjects and when entering the U.S. army I was qualified to become anything I wanted, and was given a choice, even though the Vietnam War was at it's height, 1968 and 1969. More American deaths occurred in that time period than any other. In any event, after a great deal of combat and wounds, I fought hard to learn and as mentioned I owned a computer business and was a computer consultant.

 

The reason I like FSX is because I also became a commercial pilot, fixed wing. Many of my flights are to places that I actually flew to in real life.

 

I was also what the navy calls a Mustang, a person that climbed through the ranks and was very successful in commanding ground forces. And, I did other things that doctors were later amazed that I had accomplished because I had a very serious problem, and I do not think the massive amounts of Agent Orange dumped in my AO in Viet Nam helped any, more was used in and around my AO than any other place.

 

My war wounds eventually became crushing because as I aged I did not have the energy to expend in order to excel at my work, and then it got to the point that I could no longer be at a normal capability level. That is more than enough, I usually do not talk about myself, however, I felt that giving you a little information may better understand me. To impart some of my lingering knowledge I still try to help people with computer problems at different forums from time to time.

 

Dan

vortex,

 

I have already stated that I use a Seasonic Platinum series PSU and provided a link to a review of it by www.jonnyguru.com

 

Please read all of my posts - carefully before respond.

 

Thank you.

 

 

Many thanks for taking the time to explain your thoughts Dan, it's very much appreciated.

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martin,

 

Some of your comments, such as, "A PSU with a lesser efficiency rating isn't a PSU of lesser quality."  For the vast majority of PSUs your statement is false.  I will not address the rest of your comments because this post will be longer than I wanted and I do not want to add to it.

 

Dan

 

 

For a more accurate understanding of my point see this quote. I've underlined the important bit. 

 

 

 

 

80 Plus, Gold, or Platinum is the "efficiency" of the PSU, and it doesn't necessarily relate to the expected lifespan of the PSU.

 

 

Titanium PSU's are now becoming available. More efficient than Platinum. So what are we going to do, label our Platinum PSU's as "not as reliable" and ditch them for a new Titanium PSU? No of course not. Platinum from a quality manufacturer would be a great choice, and so would Gold from a quality manufacturer, despite the fact that Titanium is now available.

 

If your Gold PSU, or your Platinum PSU or your Titanium PSU is a quality make, built with high quality components, then you are good to go.

 

All of us here are enthusiasts, and the majority of us buy quality PSU's from the likes of Corsair, Seasonic, Antec, Enermax, EVGA.

 

Your comment below doesn't refer to PSU's from lesser brands, or of lesser quality. But it does clearly imply that you are of the opinion that Platinum PSU's are of a higher quality than Gold etc. There may be some components in a highly efficient PSU that have been uprated, but that doesn't mean a lesser efficiency PSU is going to fail earlier or be less reliable.

 

Don't forget, we are comparing Titanium to Platinum, or Platinum to Gold.  Any uprating of components to handle the "somewhat" higher efficiency will not be enough to suddenly render our slightly lower efficiency PSU undesirable. Much of this striving for ultimate efficiency is a marketing gimmick!

 

 

Many people argue that an 80 PLUS rating of Platinum is more than needed, however, with overclocking for years at a time you should use the best you can afford.

 

 

It may be the best for efficiency, but that doesn't imply it's the best for longevity and reliability.

 

Luke was spot on in my opinion. Choose a quality make, the wattage you require, and then consider the efficiency you would like. But as you are purchasing a high quality make [if you have any sense] you absolutely should not be concerned that your Platinum PSU instead of Titanium, or Gold instead of Platinum will have a lesser lifespan or reliability.

 

Reminds me of my trusty old low efficiency Antec PSU. Many years old, had hell of a battering. Even been dismantled to clean out dust. [Don't attempt this yourselves]... still going strong. Also have an Enermax, same applies. Platinum or Titanium rated PSU's don't suddenly render them super reliable.

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