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Hi everyone,

 

I've just built my first PC using an intel 7700K. I bought a coolermaster tx3 EVO for the air cooling as I won't overclock it for the moment.

 

Now I'm confident I got the built done mostly right but have some worries about the cooling. I put a blob of thermal paste on the CPU then spread it with a spatula before placing the cooler & heatsink on. It didn't quite seat the first time but I got it there.

 

After testing it out a bit I'm worried the temps are a bit high. Idle its anywhere from high 30's C but after a few mins of FSX temps can peak in the 80's however game performance is great.

 

I haven't overclocked anything but am not sure what to check or how to go about making sure I'm not cooking my CPU. Appreciate the help in advance.

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80 is pretty high.... Perhaps you used to much paste. I would clean it and use just two drops and see what it does.

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80 is pretty high.... Perhaps you used to much paste. I would clean it and use just two drops and see what it does.

Thanks. So less is better I'm assuming? Is it better to just leave the two drops or should I spread it out?

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Im building a 7700k with 2 Titans X Pascal with a custom water loop.... There are some reviews showing high temps with a mild overclock and for that reason Im going to delid my cpu same as I did with the 4770k build Im using in the meantime...

If interested there is a deliding device for 115x at Rockit Cool... My first delid was using the vice method... If not careful enough you might bend the chip board...

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Looks you did wrong with the thermal paste.

 

Just a small amount in the center and the pressure of the cooler will do the rest of the job.

 

Also get good thermal pastes like Arctic MX-4, Noctua etc.

 

Remember with thermal paste, less is more! If you use too much, it won't transfer the heat it will keep the heat.

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Thanks. So less is better I'm assuming? Is it better to just leave the two drops or should I spread it out?

Just two drops in the middle will be fine. It will spread evenly once you press the CPU cooler unit on top of it. 

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Hi, I'm not into CPU technology at all, but it makes me curious as to why the customer must make these modifications (de-lidding, thermal paste, etc). If there is any method that would reduce CPU operating temperatures, why does this not come from the manufacturer?

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You can get lower temperatures from your CPU by reducing it's multiplier and lower the voltage.  Not what we want for simming. Another solution to get lower temperatures is to have after market cooling. 

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Arctic Silver products are out of the game, they used to do good stuff, but not anymore.

 

Artic MX-4 is not made by Arctic Silver, name are similar but the quality are very different, difference are around 5ºC between the products, it's a big thing

 

My i7 7700k shoudl arrive by the end of this week with the Asus Maximus IX Code and will be cooled with h100i v2, I will overclock it to 5Ghz with 1.3V (I hope) and show my results with Artic MX-4 Thermal Paste.


You can get lower temperatures from your CPU by reducing it's multiplier and lower the voltage.  Not what we want for simming. Another solution to get lower temperatures is to have after market cooling. 

it's a 7700k he is already using after market coolers, the unlocked CPUs are not coming with stock coolers anymore

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Peter, the CPU manufacturers are into high-number production lines. Thousands upon thousands of CPUs are produced at differing qualities. Only a comparatively small percentage make it into the high-end bins, which will go on to have the highest clocking frequencies. These in turn are kitted out with cost-effective, adequate cooling in the form of the interface and die lids which are sufficient to keep the processor at a reasonable temperature when used within specification. if you want the equipment to last longer or run higher than specified, then you are going to have to ´replace the standard solutions. This is where de-lidding, exchanging the thermal interface material, high-end air and water cooling comes in to place. The manufacturer is not that interested in the customer running their hardware out of specification. Luckily, they give us the option (in the form of K processors, unlocked multipliers) to run them above specification. We just have to make sure that theCPUs don't get cooked in the process :)

 

In a nutshell, it is not in Intel's interest to make such costly moderations, as, most of the time, their CPUs are running at stock and mostly at idle (just look at the performance profile of office PCs... they do more over the lunch break on YouTube than during actual working hours :) ) CPUs don't normally need to run any cooler than they do at stock clock speeds with stock cooling solutions.

 

A

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Peter, the CPU manufacturers are into high-number production lines. Thousands upon thousands of CPUs are produced at differing qualities. Only a comparatively small percentage make it into the high-end bins, which will go on to have the highest clocking frequencies. These in turn are kitted out with cost-effective, adequate cooling in the form of the interface and die lids which are sufficient to keep the processor at a reasonable temperature when used within specification. if you want the equipment to last longer or run higher than specified, then you are going to have to ´replace the standard solutions. This is where de-lidding, exchanging the thermal interface material, high-end air and water cooling comes in to place. The manufacturer is not that interested in the customer running their hardware out of specification. Luckily, they give us the option (in the form of K processors, unlocked multipliers) to run them above specification. We just have to make sure that theCPUs don't get cooked in the process :)

 

In a nutshell, it is not in Intel's interest to make such costly moderations, as, most of the time, their CPUs are running at stock and mostly at idle (just look at the performance profile of office PCs... they do more over the lunch break on YouTube than during actual working hours :) ) CPUs don't normally need to run any cooler than they do at stock clock speeds with stock cooling solutions.

 

A

Thanks for the info!

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i installed my 7700k today and waiting on a new case for it. i have mine set to 4.8ghz at 1.265v with arctic silver 5 and under exteme stress testing it hits 70c. i am hoping to hit the 5ghz at 1.335v when i have everything moved to the other case and a different closed loop cooler.

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Hi everyone,

 

I've just built my first PC using an intel 7700K. I bought a coolermaster tx3 EVO for the air cooling as I won't overclock it for the moment.

 

Now I'm confident I got the built done mostly right but have some worries about the cooling. I put a blob of thermal paste on the CPU then spread it with a spatula before placing the cooler & heatsink on. It didn't quite seat the first time but I got it there.

 

After testing it out a bit I'm worried the temps are a bit high. Idle its anywhere from high 30's C but after a few mins of FSX temps can peak in the 80's however game performance is great.

 

I haven't overclocked anything but am not sure what to check or how to go about making sure I'm not cooking my CPU. Appreciate the help in advance.

 

 

The best method of applying TIM, as evidenced by the research done by Innovation Cooling, is to apply one small [5mm] blob of paste in the centre of the heat spreader. The pressure of your cooler will then spread the paste evenly across the IHS. And importantly, this method will avoid any chance of air pockets forming.

 

http://www.innovationcooling.com/application.html

 

 

After testing it out a bit I'm worried the temps are a bit high. Idle its anywhere from high 30's C but after a few mins of FSX temps can peak in the 80's however game performance is great.

 

 

 

Idle temp is not just dependant on your cooler's capability, it's also dependent on your fan speed and whether the CPU is throttling back frequency and voltage at idle. 30's is not an issue at idle.

 

FSX temps in the 80's is high with no overclock....

 

1. You don't say which motherboard manufacturer, but do bear in mind that early Asus BIOS [and may well apply to other manufacturers] for Kaby Lake did result in high temps. Therefore, make sure you install the latest BIOS for your motherboard.

 

 

I haven't overclocked anything but am not sure what to check or how to go about making sure I'm not cooking my CPU. Appreciate the help in advance.

 

 

 

 

80 degrees will not cook your CPU, it's a safe temp. If the CPU approaches 100c [TJ Max] it will reduce it's frequency and voltage automatically to avoid damage and at higher temp will shut down. However... until you've resolved your temperature issue, do not overclock and do not run any kind of stress test! 

 

 

 It didn't quite seat the first time but I got it there.

 

 

 

 

Then your cooler may well still be the issue. Reapply the TIM as I suggested above, and hopefully if you carefully attach the cooler it might help. However... I'm doubtful that being a bit heavy with TIM application would cause temps that high, incorrect cooler mounting might.

Hi, I'm not into CPU technology at all, but it makes me curious as to why the customer must make these modifications (de-lidding, thermal paste, etc). If there is any method that would reduce CPU operating temperatures, why does this not come from the manufacturer?

 

 

 

Customers don't at all "have to make these modifications". Kaby lake seems to be overclocking well, anywhere from 4.8 GHz to 5.2 GHz. Reports of high temps are mostly early BIOS issues and the luck of the draw. [silicone lottery]

 

But since Ivy Bridge, Intel have [for the most part] abandoned soldering the IHS [integrated Heat Spreader] to the CPU Die. There are a number of reasons for that, it's very costly to do so, a very complex process and in addition the 14 NM process introduces additional vulnerabilities. 

 

Thus, those that favour high overclocks, or simply wish to reduce CPU temp, have taken to removing the IHS and replacing the less efficient Intel adhesive and thick layer of TIM and replacing it with Cool laboratories Liquid Pro or Ultra. This is a liquid metal TIM that can be applied in a very thin layer. The result is a reduction in CPU temp, anywhere from 10 to 30 degrees. 

 

You could argue of course that Intel could do a much better job of applying the adhesive and TIM. However, given that the CPU is functioning at the correct level of performance, overclocking well and both within the correct thermal margins, Intel are happy.

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