w6kd

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w6kd last won the day on November 9 2015

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About w6kd

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  1. I flew the T-38 as an instructor, and "forgiving" was *never* a word I heard used to describe the T-38's flight characteristics. We killed a lot of pilots in the traffic pattern in the T-38 over the years--it was meant to be an advanced training platform with flight characteristics representative of the high-performance fighters in the 60s, (e.g. F-104, F-4, F-102, F-100 etc) not to be "forgiving" or easy to fly. The T-37 might have been more properly characterized that way, but not the white rocket. It's a high-speed, high wing-loading, swept wing afterburning jet that will bite an inattentive pilot in the fanny in a heartbeat--we were losing around five a year to (usually fatal) accidents back when I flew them in the height of the Reagan Cold War buildup. The Milviz panel uses gauge programming to simulate the wing rock at high AOA, and I have found it to be a fair bit overdone in its onset and intensity. For the purposes of the sim, carrying a few extra knots of airspeed helps stay away from that anomalous behavior. Regards
  2. 155 + fuel + 15 knots if you're no-flap. No mention of the flaps here so far. At computed approach speed (AOA=0.6, green "donut"), the white rocket is in a continuous mild rumbling buffet that resembles driving down a well-maintained gravel road. As you get slow (high AOA), you start getting bumps that resemble potholes at AOA between 0.65-0.75 (green donut plus red chevron), and then you get wing rocking and heavy bumps at AOA exceeding 0.8 (red chevron). Flying approaches in the T-38 involved keeping a close eye on the critical performance triad--configuration, power setting, and AOA. You can have two out of the three correct, leaving just one out, and still quickly drive the pointy-end into the dirt. IIRC, it took ~92% N2 on a properly set-up final. Cheers
  3. Dead link
  4. This is the official Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) bulletin on the issues--which are two similar hardware vulnerabilities now named Spectre and Meltdown. Interestingly, when CERT first put up the bulletin, it said that the solution for the Spectre vulnerability was to replace the affected hardware...that comment has since been removed; read into that what you will. CERT: Vulnerability Note VU#584653 - CPU hardware vulnerable to side-channel attacks Pretty much any Intel CPU that would be suitable for running FS produced since the Pentium Pro (circa 1995) is affected. Some AMD CPUs are also affected, and Apple announced that all of its current iOS and Mac products are affected. Regards
  5. Running a below-ambient temp cooling system introduces a lot of potential problems, as humidity in the air moving through the case will condense on any exposed cooling lines or cooling blocks and drip water inside the case. Even once you deal with all of the potential condensation issues, people then often run excessively high voltages which, even though they may not overheat the CPU, can still cause voltage breakdown in the silicon and resulting degradation/destruction of the CPU. But it does look "cool" hehe Regards
  6. The GMAX WheelsGroundLock attribute for the integrated IK jetways has been broken since FSX SP1 (circa 2008 IIRC) and is still broken in all versions of FSX and P3D. The only way I know of to avoid the sinking wheels is for the scenery dev to use SODE instead of IK, or another form of custom animation (e.g. AES with boxed FSX). But pretty much all of the CTRL-J/IK jetways will have this issue. It has nothing to do with the ground surface materials. Regards
  7. Most of the time it makes no significant difference...but when heavily loaded--e.g. driving a 4K monitor with aggressive AA, acft and airfield addons using HD textures plus five layers of clouds, rain, dynamic lighting, etc, I can keep things super smooth with frame rates at my 30 fps vsync lock with two SLI cards...not always so with just one, even when it's a 1080Ti. As is generally true, going after the tail of the bell curve to get that last ounce of performance is never cheap. If you can hold your nose and look the other way when frames drop into the teens while flying a night approach into bad wx at a complex add-on airport, then you can do without it. And you can certainly manage your flight conditions to mostly avoid those situations. I like to charge ahead with impunity, hence two SLI 1080Ti GPUs. Worth it? To me, yes. To many others, probably not. It's value is all in the eye of the beholder. I know guys that aren't golf pros that pay $175 every Sunday to play a round of golf with a $4000 set of golf clubs, too. ;-) Cheers
  8. Aerosoft says they (well, Simwings, actually) are releasing a P3Dv4-specific Pro version of PANC next month. Regards
  9. RFSceneryBuilding's LEAS (Oviedo Asturias) is a good one. Justsim has P3D versions of LEJR (Jerez/La Parra) and LEGE (Girona/La Costa) that look interesting. Regards
  10. Anyone know if it can be installed and run from a different PC over a network?
  11. Easiest way is to add a PCIe USB card and use that. They're pretty cheap. Something like this: Mailiya PCI-E to USB 3.0 4 Port PCI Express Expansion Card
  12. Was this using P3Dv3, FSX, or FSX-SE?
  13. Rob McCarthy at Lockheed Martin is reporting that the 12 Dec 17 update (KB4054517) to Win 10 version 1709 (Fall Creator's Edition) has finally solved the "Error creating child window" problem on 32-bit versions of P3D running under Win 10 64. Any other experiences (good or bad) after installing this update? Are FSX, FSX-SE, and/or P3Dv3 working again after several months of butt pain surrounding these errant Win 10 updates? Inquiring minds want to know... Regards
  14. I've been running on a custom water loop the last four builds, as I have always liked the very low noise and the high cooling performance. I mitigate the leak risk by keeping the pump, radiators, flow meter sender, and tank in a cooling tower outside the case, and run the 1/2" I.D. water lines in through the back of the case via a drip loop. I also run a Koolance water detect loop/alarm in the case. That said, I recently swapped out my GPUs, and for the first time in many upgrades/builds, the noise and temps on the new cards with air coolers might actually be good enough to preclude putting water blocks on them. I still prefer to have the CPU at 65 deg rather than 85 deg, so the water loop is still useful. After eight years of running water-cooled PCs, I'm comfortable with the build procedures, system maintenance, and operation, plus I have all the tools, so water loops seem very natural now. Regards
  15. When overclocking, the differences in quality of some mobo components, like higher-quality capacitors and heat sinks on the VRM circuits, can make a difference in longevity and stability. Some of the meaningful differences also include things like the number and type of USB and SATA ports (and their associated controllers), dual-BIOS setups that can help prevent downtime from bricking the BIOS ROM during a BIOS update, dual-LAN adapters, higher-frequency VRMs with more phases, additional fan headers, etc. And some of the more sophisticated boards also offer more configuration options in the BIOS to facilitate overclocking. If actual human support is important, then EVGA boards get a lot more attractive...most of the Taiwanese manufacturers (ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, ASRock etc) have useless support departments that offer little more than a place to get an RMA for a return. That said, some of it is cosmetic BS...like funkadelic lighting options, robo-shields that make your build resemble a Cylon Warlord from Battlestar Galactica, etc. I go middle of the road in my builds...latest (i7-7700K) uses an ASUS Z270 TUF Mark 1 (high end would be the Rampage, low end the generic Z270 Deluxe). Cheers