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dmbusmc

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About dmbusmc

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  1. I'll have to dig in some old files to see if I still have them. Not sure why they disappeared here, but it was about 4 years ago now so they might have cleaned house a bit.
  2. Great job!!! And really looking forward to a KDAL!!!
  3. If all else fails your best bet may be to get in contact with Majestic directly. They may send you right back to Just Flight to work it out, but hey, worth a shot: http://majesticsoftware.com/mjc8q400/support.html
  4. Go to your main FSX folder/MyTraffic and search for "VHHH". Disable any .bgls that come up by renaming them to .off.
  5. And funnily enough you can easily prove that it is actually true with a 5 minute experiment. Photo scenery bases and areas hit VAS no matter where in the world you are. It may not be much, but it can be the tipping point easily enough. 3D objects are what won't load since they have a set LOD radius to work with.
  6. As Jeremy has stated you will need a certain number of hours worth of total time to qualify for your rATP (restricted ATP) or full ATP, if you plan on flying in the US. The amount of hours required is broken down in a few ways. Broken down simply: Full ATP requirements: 23 years of age, 1500 hours total time (TT), 500 cross country time(XC), 100 night, etc. Restricted ATP requirements: - Former Military pilot= 750 total time or - Training done part 141 with a 4 year bachelor's in an aviation degree (at least 60 credit hours): 1,000 hours total time, 200 hours cross country time or - Training done part 141 with 2 year associates in an aviation degree (at least 30 credit hours): 1,250 hours total time, 200 hours cross country time or - Training done part 61 or other: 1,500 hours total time, 200 hours cross country time. There is also a new exemption for part 142 training that allows pilots trained under that part to have the same lower requirements of 1,000 hours total time. You won't have to worry about part 142 training though, practically no one out there does it anymore, big school's are nearly all part 141. The source for everything I just listed there, you can search around the FAA website, but also you can read it straight from the regulations (if you're into that sorta thing ) here at part 61.159 and 61.160: http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/retrieveECFR?gp=&r=PART&n=14y2.0.1.1.2#14:2.0.1.1.2.7.1.7 Now, that is quite a chunk of time needed, even if you qualify for the 141/142 exemption to lower it to 1,000 hours TT and 200 XC. You will definitely not get that much in training (if you do, you should be worried and reconsidering...). So, you will have to find a job flying that helps build those much needed hours. The number 1 job right out of training? Funnily enough it is instructing. Big schools always hire instructors, and especially lean on ones they have trained. Most universities will offer you an instructing position before you even graduate (it was in my case and almost everyone I've worked with). If you need the 1,000 hours TT and 200 XC for an rATP, you can probably achieve that in a year to a year and a half of instructing, if you have a relatively constant workload. If you need to get the 1,250 or 1,500 TT and 200 XC for the rATP, you can figure two years or a little more. The most difficult would be if you were to go for the full ATP. It also requires 1,500 TT, but it also requires 500 XC. That 500 XC is a killer, and can be pretty hard to get unless you have extra money to burn or get creative on your flights with students. Regionals will hire you with an rATP, so don't worry too much about the difference between the rATP and full ATP. Typically the airline will take care of that when you qualify for upgrade. Instructing is extremely rewarding though. Don't let that worry you. The upside if you end up not liking it is that you won't be doing it forever. Do your best while you're there, and remember that you were a student too at some point. Work for them and you'll be rewarded in the end of that one or two years with a few tons of metal, some turbine engines at your fingertips, and a hundred or so pax in the back. Hope that helps clarify a little bit, feel free to ask anymore questions.
  7. It all depends on what you want, and of course, what you can afford. Embry Riddle Daytona and Prescott, University of North Dakota, Purdue, and Ohio State all have very good aviation degree and training programs. They will come at a cost of course. With that type of University training, it is very structured and procedure based training aimed towards preparing students for the airlines, corporate, and/or military. Contacts and networking through them are also excellent. You will run into grads from these programs nearly everywhere you go in US aviation. Money-wise you will take a large hit, averaging 40k a year with flight costs. In the end you will more than likely end up instructing for 1-2 years afterwards building hours to qualify for applying to the airlines. Usually though it is very easy to get an instructing position at the university after all of your training. The other option is choosing a college/degree of your choice, but doing your training through schools like ATP or American Flyers, which run 'fast-track' type programs. These are fast and dirty, they get you what you need in terms of the certificates, at a lower cost and lower timeframe. The drawback is the quality you walk away with. I don't refer to the quality of instruction though, I've known instructors from both schools who were excellent, but it is the pace that is the concern. Retention and correlation especially in the long term don't always come easy when drinking from a firehose. It gets you what you need in terms of certificates and ratings, more quickly and cheaper than a big university. These schools also usually have good contacts and ways into the industry. More than likely though you will still have to instruct at that same school or part 61 to gain the hours you need afterwards, same as with the big universities. The certificates and the hours you hold don't come with the names of the school where you got them. Your resume probably will though. My opinion: If money is of no real concern, you want the big name, and you want to walk away with more knowledge than you know what to do with after each course, go big university (ERAU, UND, PU, OSU, etc.). If you want the certificates and the hours quick, go with the specialized flight schools (ATP, AF, etc.) with a 4 year degree from any college/university. Largely your actions, personality, and contacts will define where you will go in the US aviation industry. Where you get your certs and ratings may not matter at all. There's a lot of haters out there for both sides, big uni, specialized school, and part 61. In my opinion you just have to weigh the issue based on reputation, time, and money.
  8. This is completely on point. There's such a misunderstanding of the public that FO's are basically unqualified 'helpers'. It's sad to see. A fresh-out-of IOE FO may be slightly behind the aircraft as they get used to the pace of operations, but put a few months under their belt and situations like this can be handled efficiently and effectively by them. If you read between the lines this story is proof. The media, all outlets, especially of late CNN, try to inflate, exacerbate, and dramatize the situation beyond what was really going on. I'm not trying to downplay the role this gent had in this, it's good to add someone to your task management in this type of situation if able. I just can't stand the stigma that the media continues any chance they get. I just hope that simmers and aspiring pilots (as well as the public, but far chance) out there realize this point.
  9. Here's a post over on the Aerosoft forums on how I use them together, it's basically a step-by-step run through on how to set it up. Hope it helps: http://forum.aerosoft.com/index.php?/topic/68241-gsx-and-aes/?p=492534
  10. Probably what you've seen in the NGX is FS2Crew: http://www.fs2crew.com/cart/
  11. Another vote for the PNW. Through and through their best.
  12. It means that GSX will work for free at that airport, no need to purchase it. Not a trial or anything, it's just there and can be fully used to my knowledge. If you want it for everywhere else you'd need to purchase it.
  13. Majestic Dash 8 Q400 to fill that gap between the Twotter and the NGX would be my suggestion: http://majesticsoftware.com/mjc8q400/ If you want to bring up specific airport scenery....brace yourself... ^_^
  14. Looks like AES will be the way to go. Those gates look beautiful though for LVFR. Another vote up for this scenery, loving it immensely. TNCM-TJSJ or back is a great short hop. Finally able to take away the Blueprint version...
  15. Yes you can. You will find the airport diagram by click the "download pdf" below the "Airport Diagram" section on the right side of the page. It takes you to this: http://155.178.201.160/d-tpp/1404/00610AD.PDF If you are looking for gate/parking positions, or taxi flow charts like some airports have in Europe, that's a different story.
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