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Garys

CAE to Buy Lockheed flight training

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Looks like CAE is in the process of purchasing Lockheeds commercial flight training division. It doesn't mention Lockheeds military simulator division but  I wonder if this could possibly affect the development and attainability of P3D to the general public

 

 http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/cae-strikes-deal-for-lockheed-martin-flight-training-unit/article28833359/

 

That's a great company. Visited their headquarters several times. Very impressive. 

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Looking through LMCFT's product portfolio, it doesn't look like P3D is part of that.  This division was formerly Sim-Industries, which was bought by LM early last year and renamed LMCFT.  They mostly do big-box sim training for large commercial aircraft (Boeing & Airbus).

 

It appears to be a much better fit with CAE's business model.

 

Regards

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Hi,

 

just found this one: http://www.prepar3d.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6305&p=129345&sid=a40affda934b08c5a8d58e3592570dc1#p129345

 

So it will not affect us, as P3D is part of Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training (MST) :wink:

 

Yes, good news. I was worried for a second... Always better to ask this to whom it actually concerns before speculation starts.  :wink:

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Yes, good news. I was worried for a second... Always better to ask this to whom it actually concerns before speculation starts.  :wink:

Darn it Jeroen!! I was looking forward to at LEAST 30 pages of pure speculation about the end of P3D, etc!!!

 

:Devil:

 

Vic

 

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Darn it Jeroen!! I was looking forward to at LEAST 30 pages of pure speculation about the end of P3D, etc!!!

 

:Devil:

 

Vic

 

 

 

   :lol: Good one Vic 

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Darn it Jeroen!! I was looking forward to at LEAST 30 pages of pure speculation about the end of P3D, etc!!!

 

:Devil:

 

Vic

 

 

:lol:

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Lockheed Martin is a very large organization ... I was actually surprised at how closely they have worked with Boeing and Airbus over the many years going way back to the Boeing's B-29 (built by Lockheed).

 

LMCFT was "Sim-Industries" which was initially part of MST until it got moved to LMCFT and is now CAE Inc.  How's that for a corporate shuffle?!

 

Lots of diverse output from LM http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/features/2015/151202-mst-accelerating-learning-through-game-play.html  and http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/features/2015/151201-mst-gearing-up-for-f-35a-operations.html

 

LM have a fairly significant and diverse investment in simulations, training, and education.

 

Cheers, Rob.

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Well, as long as P3D can go 64bit, and perhaps a bit more optimized (if possible), we would have a nice sim for the next 20 years or more. Hey, don't shoot me now, we endured FSX all this time;  developers kept developing and we kept flying. Not that we are all satisfied with current version. Don't get me wrong, it is a great sim; but, I'm sure it can only get better with Lockheed's support.

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The modern business of war is the business of war games.  Simulation.   I would bet that P3D is something that can't be done away with at this point, simulated training is probably a defense mandate.

The B-29 Superfortress and the L-049 Constellation are siblings, the 49 taking after the older brother.   They share the same and design path/heritage.    Even though I knew that I never thought about the connection, that LM must have made the B-29.  I always assumed friendly war-time collaboration.


 

 


perhaps a bit more optimized (if possible)

  I think this is more in Microsoft's hands now.  I still don't think 64bit is the ticket.  But I also haven't thought much about it, I've always sensed enough headroom in 32.  Memory is not the way I think about it, bandwidth (how fast things go in/out of the CPU) is.

A video segment from the second link provided by Rob above ( 

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/features/2015/151201-mst-gearing-up-for-f-35a-operations.html )

 

 

I meant to have that start at 59 seconds, but the whole thing is good.   Looks like default P3D scenery in there.  Eglin is P3D's home base.

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The B-29 Superfortress and the L-049 Constellation are siblings, the 49 taking after the older brother. They share the same and design path.

I wouldn't call them "siblings" - more like distant cousins. The B-29 was designed and built by Boeing, while the Connie was a Lockheed product. The two companies were (and still are) competitors.

 

The direct descendant of the B-29 was the Boeing 377 Stratocruiser, the post war airliner that was, for all intents and purposes, a B-29 outfitted with a larger fuselage for carrying passengers. Likewise the Boeing KC-97 tanker, which was the military version of the Stratocruiser, and served in the Air Force through the mid 1960's and National Guard up to 1978.

 

Both aircraft (Constellation and the B-29) did have a common heritage in using the same engines - the Wright 3350 18- cylinder compound radial. The Stratocruiser used the even larger Pratt and Whitney Wasp Major with 28(!) cylinders per engine.

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Good Jim - You Forgot the Black Slime Oil Dripping Turbo Chargers - As Magnificent an Aeronautical Achievement as the R3350 was - You NEVER Wanted to Stand Downwind From Them - Especially in a White "Air America" Crew Chiefs Uniform - there is NOTHING Better than the Sound of a - BIG - ROUND - ENGINE - The Bigger - The Better - Johnman

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Boeing KC-97 tanker

 My older half-siblings were brats to a crew chief on one of those.

 

 

They share the same

[engine].

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CAE recently outbid Flight Safety for the long-term fixed-wing training contract for the U.S Army. We do our annual refreshers through them as well. Great company.

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The B-29 was designed and built by Boeing

 

B-29 was designed by Boeing, but Lockheed Martin helped build them including the Enola Gay (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enola_Gay).  Boeing and Lockheed still work together to this day ... maybe when the L1011 was around they were fierce competitors, they don't appear to be today (certainly not on the commercial side).

 

Cheers, Rob.

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B-29 was designed by Boeing, but Lockheed Martin helped build them including the Enola Gay (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enola_Gay). Boeing and Lockheed still work together to this day ... maybe when the L1011 was around they were fierce competitors, they don't appear to be today (certainly not on the commercial side).

 

Cheers, Rob.

That's true. During the war years, many aircraft manufacturers contracted to build sub assemblies, or even entire aircraft for other companies. Even the US automobile industry was involved, with many General Motors, Chrysler and Ford auto factories converted to manufacture airplanes and aircraft engines.

 

Of course Boeing's main competitor was always Douglas Aircraft. The rivalry between those two companies was intense. (Until Boeing finally bought out McDonnel Douglas in the 1990s).

 

Now, of course, Boeing's chief rival is Airbus.

 

Subcontracting has always been a part of the aircraft manufacturing industry. During the 1970s, the Convair division of General Dynamics built the center fuselage section of the Douglas DC-10 at their factory in San Diego. Interestingly, the completed fuselage sections were then flown to the Douglas factory in Long Beach aboard an Aero Spacelines "Pregnant Guppy" heavy lift transport which was.... a heavily modified Boeing Stratocruiser -direct descendant of the B-29. The old literally helping give birth to the new.

 

Even more ironic - for many years, Airbus used later versions of the "Guppy" aircraft to transport A320 sub assemblies to the factory in Toulouse for completion

CAE recently outbid Flight Safety for the long-term fixed-wing training contract for the U.S Army. We do our annual refreshers through them as well. Great company.

I have done maintenance training at both Flight Safety and CAE, and found the CAE training to be more comprehensive. It is a great company. A good friend of mine recently retired from active flying as a charter pilot to become a Hawker sim instructor at CAE, and he loves working there.

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