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swnelson

A2A C172 or JustFlight C152?

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Hi all - new member here so sorry if this is in the wrong place etc.

I was wondering - as someone learning on a C152, would you guys recommend I install the A2A or the Justflight?  From what I've heard, the A2A is significantly morea accurate but the JF seems pretty good too (and it's the right aircraft...). Then again  the C152 is similar to the 172...

Just wanted your opinions re his matter.

Thanks!

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A2A's has a maintainance hanger, with simulated wear and tear on the aircraft / Engine.you can break things if not treated correctly, like dropping the flaps at too a high speed ect..brake wear, tire wear...oil burnt in engine...the list goes on, and better flight dynamics.

Its called Accu-sim - check it out

 

 

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Posted (edited)

If I were you, I'd download the free demo of the JF Cessna and see if it suits you. The demo is limited to flights of ten minutes' duration and maximum altitude of 1,500 feet, but that should be enough to see if it suits you, if not, you could then give the A2A Cessna a whirl. If you are learning on a 152, you'd be better off with something of a similar layout to your aircraft. A 152 flies quite a bit differently from the 172 in spite of their broad similarities.

Edited by Chock
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A2A is arguably the best developer of GA aircraft out there but, to be fair, the Just Flight aircraft developed by their in-house team have an excellent reputation. The 152 is one of these and although I don’t have it, I do have the JF Arrow which was also developed by their in-house team and that is an excellent product. 

Something else you might like to keep in mind is that you get both FSX and P3Dv4 versions with the Just Flight 152, which is a definite bonus if you migrate to P3D in the future, whereas with the A2A 172, as with all the A2A aircraft, you would have to purchase it again at the full price if you ever need the P3Dv4 version.

Bill

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Posted (edited)

A2A even differentiate price and licences between Academic and Professional P3D with no upgrade path between them. 

A2A is slightly better than JF with the maintenance hangar and walkaround, although both will simulate stuff like vapour lock, flat batteries etc. The latest JF GA are sound purchases. And as others have said, there's a demo to try! Just need then to make a 177 Cardinal now...

Edited by ckyliu
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Posted (edited)

If it turns out that neither of them float your boat, you might also want to consider an alternative, this being the Alabeo/Carenado Piper PA38 Tomahawk. Of course the PA28 is not your Cessna 152 in which you are learning, but the PA28 does have a little special relationship with the Cessna 152 specifically related to training which is worth knowing about...

When Piper wanted to produce a rival two-seat training aircraft to the Cessna 152, they asked a lot of ab-initio PPL flying instructors what they'd like to see in a two-seat trainer, two things were listed more than anything else by those instructors - they wanted a bit more elbow room (obviously!), and they wanted an aircraft which was more easy to spin, and which required control inputs to recover from that spin. The Cessna 150 and 152 were designed to fly out of a spin, which is a great safety feature, but it's not a great feature for a training aeroplane when you want to teach pupils how to recover from a spin. As a result, the PA28 has a Whitcombe (GA(W)-1) wing aerofoil cross section, which is one that requires control inputs from the pilot in order to come out of a spin.

Many PPL syllabus these days teach 'spin avoidance' rather than spin recovery technique (this is something I've long been a very vocal critic of). Of course it is best to try to avoid spins in normal flight operations, but failing to teach pilots what to do if they fail to avoid a spin, is lunacy in my opinion. Every pilot should not only know how to get out of a spin, but should also have done so several times when learning in order to drill it into them. You may not have to do spin recoveries in your pilot training syllabus, but there is nothing stopping you from playing around with them them in your flight sim (with the caveat that you should never apply stuff you've tried in a sim to a real aeroplane unless you know it to be the correct technique and understand it fully of course, and if you ever do any spins in a real aeroplane, don't forget a clearing turn and your H.A.S.S.L.E. check). You will find the Alabeao/Carenado PA28 does actually do a pretty good replication of a spin, since that was kind of the point of that aeroplane, and it's a very inexpensive add-on too, can usually be found for about ten quid.

Another thing...

It's worth bearing in mind much of the time that whilst stuff like A2A's aeroplanes might seem a bit pricey compared to other offerings, most of the time you do tend to get what you pay for in the way they handle. For example, the A2A Piper Commanche 250 is indeed a bit pricey for an add-on GA aeroplane, but that price becomes worth it when you find out that it does a better emulation of a sideslip in P3D and FSX than any other aeroplane I've ever tried out in any flight sim ever. This matters to me because I tend to like sideslipping aeroplanes on approach to lose a bit of the spare altitude I like to keep as a safety margin, this is a habit of mine from having flown gliders a lot; a bit of spare altitude is no bad thing in an aeroplane with no ability to go around or add a bit of throttle on short finals lol.

This is the kind of 'not quite so obvious' things you are paying for with A2A's add ons. Personally, I think A2A is hands-down the premier flight sim add-on maker there is by a country mile. So if you are looking for subtle realism in the add-on you do choose, that is A2A's strong point.

Edited by Chock

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Although it has to be said you can’t beat an A2A aircraft, if you’re learning on the 152 that’s the one you want. You’ll be able to practice your drills and the power ,pitch  and speeds should all be correct for your actual training aircraft, that’s much better than practicing  on something not quite the same.

I’ve got the justflight 152 and it’s a very stable accurate flight model great for learning on and the cockpit is a very accurate rendition of an actual 152, you’ll feel right at home in it.

Ive been using it to teach my 9 year old the PPL syllabus, it’s a cracking little plane.

Jon

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