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I have the V.III version of the 747 and I have been taxiing without undo use of the brakes, didn't even go that far, but they heat up nonetheless. I do not use pedals , just a joystick and a squeeze brake lever.  Sometimes it happens after landing too. Didn't happen much on the earlier version. What's going on?? Anyway to turn it of

Tx

Ken

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The problem is that with a lever, there's really no gradual control of the brakes as you would have with the pedals. It's either all or nothing, so as soon as you pull that lever, you're instantly slamming down the brakes. Only thing you can really do is pull the lever, and then release it immediately, see what happens.

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Don't you have an available axis somewhere on your joystick or throttle ?  I use an old throttle  as brake. With FSUIPC you can program this as an axis and brake adjustable 1 to 100% percent..

 

b rdgs / Dick

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5 hours ago, Contactdepture said:

I have the V.III version of the 747 and I have been taxiing without undo use of the brakes, didn't even go that far, but they heat up nonetheless. I do not use pedals , just a joystick and a squeeze brake lever.  Sometimes it happens after landing too. Didn't happen much on the earlier version. What's going on?? Anyway to turn it of

Tx

Ken

IMHO There should be a way to disable this feature, is not realistic with a joystick, the only advice that I can give you, if you get stuck you can always repair via FMC.

There is a cool down option and repair tire that fix instantly the problem.

MENU/FS ACTIONS/GROUND MAINTENANCE, hit NEXT PAGE, then select COOL BRAKES at LSK 1L.
The path with FSUIPC well, is annoyng to program every costum aircraft, that you always forget to backup upon reinstall or get corrupt.

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Well Fabrizio, I have different experiences with FSUIPC. I do not find it annoying but I am very happy with it as a very useful tool. 

I have an automated backup every day at startup of the system so I never forget. I do not  need to reinstall anything ever as whenever something goes corrupt I go back in my backups to the day things were still working fine.

b rdgs / Dick

=

 

 

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I too have the same problem with break temp and tire pressure (always together).

I hardly make to runway without FMC options of cool brakes and repair tire.

It has nothing to do with weight of the aircraft, fuel load, speed of taxiing etc.

I don't use FSUIPC in P3Dv4. 

I wish there was a way to make it a choice in FMC options as many other simulation options for those who do not have pedals.

Don't you agree, it is not realistic to repair tires on the taxiway. Cool brakes is OK. There are the brakes fans.

Bill

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In the FWIW department, instead of using my joystick brake switch (trigger), I use the keyboard "." [period] key.  It is much more accurate since I can tap it quickly and simulate gradual braking.  Makes taxiing much more manageable for me in the PMDG heavies.

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32 minutes ago, dmiannay said:

In the FWIW department, instead of using my joystick brake switch (trigger), I use the keyboard "." [period] key.  It is much more accurate since I can tap it quickly and simulate gradual braking.

Pretty sure you can do the same thing with the trigger on a joystick. At least, that's how I've always done it when I was using one.

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You need to get good rudder pedals and a yoke.  I don't see the logic in buying an expensive and realistic simulation like the PMDG 747, and flying it with a joystick that twist for rudder and has on/off switches for brakes, then feeling bad because it is not working realistically.

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For those of us that use rudder pedals, what is the recommended brake Sensitivity and Null recommended in native P3D brake calibration? Maybe this will help eliminate the brake overheat issues for some of us.

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1 hour ago, signmanbob said:

You need to get good rudder pedals and a yoke.  I don't see the logic in buying an expensive and realistic simulation like the PMDG 747, and flying it with a joystick that twist for rudder and has on/off switches for brakes, then feeling bad because it is not working realistically.

A yoke and rudder pedals take up a considerable amount of space. Not everyone has that kind of space available. I know my old desk certainly didn't have that kind of space available, it wasn't a very big desk. Not an issue with the desk I have now.

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1 hour ago, Wise87 said:

For those of us that use rudder pedals, what is the recommended brake Sensitivity and Null recommended in native P3D brake calibration? Maybe this will help eliminate the brake overheat issues for some of us.

I keep it simple, full deflection set and centered set.  The key is understanding how much deflection of the toe brake is required to apply the lightest level of braking.  Say for example braking becomes active when the toe brake moves an inch.... and full braking is five inches.  In this case almost all of your braking should be 1-2 in and full braking only in an emergency.

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1 minute ago, downscc said:

I keep it simple, full deflection set and centered set.  The key is understanding how much deflection of the toe brake is required to apply the lightest level of braking.  Say for example braking becomes active when the toe brake moves an inch.... and full braking is five inches.  In this case almost all of your braking should be 1-2 in and full braking only in an emergency.

I get that much but sensitivity and null also play a key factor on how much brake is used. If I use the full 127 on sensitivity and 0 on null than simply tapping the brake will set them to max correct? That why I was wondering what PMDG recommends like they suggest with there flight control calibration.

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1 minute ago, Wise87 said:

If I use the full 127 on sensitivity and 0 on null than simply tapping the brake will set them to max correct?

Absolutely not.  The so called sensitivity is actually the span.  You want full deflection of the control to equate to a signal or value that means full deflection.  Correctly set the span and the center or zero.  Then a slight deflection of the control is translated into a brake input that equates to slight braking.

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1 minute ago, downscc said:

Absolutely not.  The so called sensitivity is actually the span.  You want full deflection of the control to equate to a signal or value that means full deflection.  Correctly set the span and the center or zero.  Then a slight deflection of the control is translated into a brake input that equates to slight braking.

Gotcha, thanks.

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1 hour ago, Captain Kevin said:

A yoke and rudder pedals take up a considerable amount of space. Not everyone has that kind of space available. I know my old desk certainly didn't have that kind of space available, it wasn't a very big desk. Not an issue with the desk I have now.

My point is that if someone expects these expensive, accurate, in-depth aircraft simulations to work realistically, they also need to have the hardware that is conducive to that result.

If you only have room for a "twisty-joystick/with trigger", then you are not benefitting from the extensive realism and expensive coding that is built into the simulation.  It is simply counter-productive. You just have to be aware of that.

With the PMDG 747-8, you have to have rudder pedals that can gently increase brake pressure.  It is exciting because you actually have to learn how to slow down and stop without overheating your disc-brakes and blowing out your tires. If you look outside, your disc-brakes will be actually glowing bright red! It's made to be that way.

I had to learn to use "autobrakes", reversers and spoilers to slow the aircraft quickly when landing. Then when it reaches around 60kts, retract the reversers and barely touch the toe-brakes to release the autobrakes. Then just let it roll for a while with the spoiler slowing it down.  When it gets around 30kts, just ever-so-lightly touch the toe-brakes to bring it down to a speed where you can turn off of the high-speed exit and bring the "Sovereign Queen" to a stop.

One has to have good hardware to reap the benefit of these expensive deep-system simulations.

I use all PFC and JetMax hardware and it truly adds immensely to the experience.

 

Bob

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1 hour ago, signmanbob said:

My point is that if someone expects these expensive, accurate, in-depth aircraft simulations to work realistically, they also need to have the hardware that is conducive to that result.

If you only have room for a "twisty-joystick/with trigger", then you are not benefitting from the extensive realism and expensive coding that is built into the simulation.  It is simply counter-productive. You just have to be aware of that.

With the PMDG 747-8, you have to have rudder pedals that can gently increase brake pressure.

Sure, but at the same time, you can't really tell people they can't fly the PMDG 747 just because they only have a joystick. I didn't have a yoke and pedals until July of last year. By that logic, should I have just not flown the PMDG 747-400 prior to that? Might be counter-productive, but sometimes, you just have to work with what you've got. Not necessarily easy, but I've managed. And with my yoke and pedals being at home, if I wanted to fly the PMDG 747-8 right now, I would have to use a joystick anyhow because I'm living in the back of a truck right now, so I certainly don't have the space for a yoke and pedals in here.

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3 hours ago, Captain Kevin said:

Sure, but at the same time, you can't really tell people they can't fly the PMDG 747 just because they only have a joystick. I didn't have a yoke and pedals until July of last year. By that logic, should I have just not flown the PMDG 747-400 prior to that? Might be counter-productive, but sometimes, you just have to work with what you've got. Not necessarily easy, but I've managed. And with my yoke and pedals being at home, if I wanted to fly the PMDG 747-8 right now, I would have to use a joystick anyhow because I'm living in the back of a truck right now, so I certainly don't have the space for a yoke and pedals in here.

Keven, you are mis-understanding what I'm saying.

I'm saying that you can't expect a high-system depth, realistic simulation to operate like it should if your hardware is sub-par.

People using a twisty-joystick with on/off clicky buttons for brakes are unhappy because PMDG has thoughtlessly made a Boeing 747-8 simulation that burns its brakes up and blows all the tires every time that they land it. 

They feel that this is a defect with the simulation and it should have the capability of turning off this failure, when the brakes burning and the tires blowing is not a failure, it is realism.

If you land a real 747-8 and just slam on the brakes like an on/off switch, the airport firetrucks will have to put out your burning and blown tires every time. That's realism, not failure.

I'm not saying that if you have a twisty-joystick you shouldn't buy the PMDG 747.  Everyone wants this aircraft! Just be creative when putting on the brakes, maybe pumping the button quickly or something.

The realism and pleasure of owning this aircraft is compromised when poor or less than adequate hardware controllers are used.

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7 minutes ago, signmanbob said:

Just be creative when putting on the brakes, maybe pumping the button quickly or something.

Pretty much what I've had to do and what I suggested.

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1 hour ago, Captain Kevin said:

Pretty much what I've had to do and what I suggested.

I agree Keven, but it sure won't give you the ultimate PMDG experience.😉

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10 minutes ago, signmanbob said:

I agree Keven, but it sure won't give you the ultimate PMDG experience.😉

I'm not disputing that, but sometimes, you have to make do with what you've got. If I could fit a yoke and pedals inside this truck, I would. I'm just incredibly space limited in here with no hope of gaining more space (I don't own the truck, I just drive it).

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9 minutes ago, Captain Kevin said:

I'm not disputing that, but sometimes, you have to make do with what you've got. If I could fit a yoke and pedals inside this truck, I would. I'm just incredibly space limited in here with no hope of gaining more space (I don't own the truck, I just drive it).

Wow!  You driven' truck and flightsimming too? That's pretty hardcore. 😊

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7 hours ago, signmanbob said:

Wow!  You driven' truck and flightsimming too? That's pretty hardcore. 😊

Yeah, if I have time to fly, I will. Lately, I haven't had time to do that, so most of the time, I only get to fly when I'm at home.

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3 hours ago, Captain Kevin said:

Yeah, if I have time to fly, I will. Lately, I haven't had time to do that, so most of the time, I only get to fly when I'm at home.

I enjoy American Truck Simulator every now and then also. I even have a steering wheel with pedals and an Eaton Roadranger shifter. So there is a lot of us trying to simulate what you do for a living too.

I make signs for a living and there is no one that simulates doing that in there spare time. 😄

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