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briansommers

recommend a good slower piston twin for IFR training.

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this IFR training.. would be Virtual training.. I don't plan to export this to the real world, however I am looking for a realistic experience as much as possible

 

I plan to conduct this on the PE network..

 

I have the Carenado B58.. maybe this is all I need?

some others I have been considering: FSD Navajo.. seems a bit old to me., Real Air Duke piston.. maybe this is the one?

 

any other good recommendations? I do prefer payware. for FSX w/sp2

 

I don't want anything to fast..


Ciao!

 

 

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Sounds like you have everything you need. The RA Duke is real nice or Carenado C340 but its hard to beat a Baron for training..

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interesting,, I have all 3..I must say.. I just don't care that much for the C340.. it seems to be a bit fps intensive, or something..

 

I'll test out the duke piston again vs the b58.. see which one I like the best.. probably the duke,, I love the turbo duke..


Ciao!

 

 

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interesting, ... about the B55, I did think about that.

 

let me test the 340,b58, duke piston and see where I want to go.


Ciao!

 

 

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Yeah Milviz C310, Baron or the Duke Piston (although it's fairly quick)....


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I don;t have the Coronado B58, but can agree with others that the MilViz version of this a/c is great.

 

For IFR, where power/prop and attitude settings are everything, there's a great book "A Structured Approach" which goes through all IFR approaches, etc., including departure issues to watch out for, with all of thes esettings for this type of aircraft.

 

Thanks, Bruce.


ASEL, Instrument.

KBJC, Colorado.

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I really love the Milviz Cessna 310R I use to owen one when I had my own company. This is very well done and works just like the real one mopstly. Mine was the 1976 Cessna 310R tail number N311ER.

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Try the Seneca. It has a much slower cruise and approach speed. You could drive final at 80knts but I would suggest you not go below 90 knts, best single engine climb speed, blue line on airspeed gauge. That is what we do in real life.

 

Greg


Greg Morin

Commercial ASMEL Instrument CFI

Beta Tester i Blue Yonder and Milviz

 

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And as always... Allow me to dissent and offer another great option: the Carenado 337, my favorite for plain ol' (plane ol' ?) IFR training/currency. I have and absolutely love the Milviz B55, but for IFR training it's hard to beat the accessibility of the 337's VC and its combination of new (GNS 530) and old (Collins Nav and Com) with HSI, flight director and second CDI and DME display - all very visible and accessible in the VC. Make the 530 an RXP, and it gets even better. The autopilot is a bit old school, but this isn't a real issue if the focus is IFR training. The B55, much as I love it, does not have a flight director or second CDI, substituting an RMI, and has no DME readout.

 

Scott

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I was just going to suggest the C337! I agree with the above - it's probably the easiest to interface with easily readable and adjustable standard radios. Personally I prefer standard type radios in lieu of tuning through a GPS... it's just easier in the sim and more conduicive to real time IFR training.

 

The Milviz C310 and B60 would be my second choices; the Milviz being the best flyer, it will require attention to pitch power and trim in a manner similar to a real aircraft, if you want something more stable, the B60 is excellent in that regard, though very likely more stable than IRL. That will help you focus a bit more on procedure and a little less on flying if that's what you want. Both have standard knob adjusted radios for ease of use. The B60 is dramatically slower than it's turboprop brother if that's an issue.

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