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Tom Allensworth

B777-200 Reference Guide, Ok to post copy? NO

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Before we could answer the question, the entire "guide" was uploaded and placed on AVSIM. A document is copyright AUTOMATICALLY when it is published. PERIOD. Without written permission from the company or person who published it, any use of that document, as it was done here, is a violation of that COPYRIGHT. What is so freaking hard to understand about that? Doing so puts AVSIM at risk and is a blatant disregard of our Terms of Service.

 

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE PERMISSION FROM THE OWNER OF A DOCUMENT, FILE, IMAGE, WHATEVER, DO NOT POST IT ON AVSIM!

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Well said Tom. Anything that is posted or used without permission on an 3rd party site is against the law!

Copyright follows a custodial sentence in the eyes of the law respect Avsims policy!

 

END OF !

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That s some serious legal problems as well for the individual that posted it and where they sourced it from. Unfortunately-a lot of aircraft QRG, POMs, and other materials are non disclosable and FOUO (For Official Use Only). In doing so, they create a firestorm of investigators that will find out where the source is from, who obtained access to it and then uploaded said information on the web. Big big NO NO NO on not only Avsim, but real world as well. 

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My father is a copyright solicitor it is a big NO ! NO !

 

 

That also goes for people who create a video on youtube using PMDG'S log without permisson

 

PMDG logo im sure is a trademark. which means this is own by them. Don't use it without there permission.

 

It is easy to fall to copright without thinking but just think these guys have a logo for a reason

 

Steveo

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  1. Who owns the copyright on photographs?

    Under law, it is the photographer who will own copyright on any photos he/she has taken, with the following exceptions:

    • If the photographer is an employee of the company the photos are taken for, or is an employee of a company instructed to take the photos, the photographer will be acting on behalf of his/her employer, and the company the photographer works for will own the copyright.
    • If there is an agreement that assigns copyright to another party.

    In all other cases, the photographer will retain the copyright, if the photographer has been paid for his work, the payment will be for the photographer’s time and typically an allocated number of prints. The copyright to the photos will remain with the photographer, and therefore any reproduction without permission would be an infringement of copyright.

    Examples:

    • If Bill Smith asks Peter Jones the photographer to photograph his wedding. Peter Jones will normally provide a single copy of the prints as part of the fee, but any additional prints Bill or his family and friend want must be ordered via Peter as he is the copyright owner and controls who can copy his work.
    • If Bill Smith engages the services of XYZ-Photos for the same job, and Peter is an employee of XYZ-Photo who instruct Peter to take the photos, XYZ-Photos will be the copyright owner and control how they are used.
  2. Copyright registration
    1. Why register?

      The purpose of registration is to ensure that you have proper, independently verifiable, evidence of the date and contnet your work. This ensures that if another party steals your photos you have solid evidence to prove your claim.

      Without registration it can be very difficult, and often impossible, to prove your ownership if another person claims the photo belong to them.

    2. Protect whole collections for a single fee

      It is possible to submit a great many photos within a single registration, and only pay a single registration fee.

      For advice on registering photographic works, please see our factsheet P-24: Registering photographic work.

  3. Using the work of others

    As with all copyright work, you should first obtain permission from the copyright owner before you use someone else’s work.You should also be prepared to pay a fee, as many photographers will charge you for using their work.

    Only the copyright owner, (or his/her authorised representative), can give permission, so you should contact the photographer, or his/her company, directly for consent. For images published on the Internet, it is typical to contact the webmaster of the site in the first instance, unless the site provides contact details for the owner of the images.

    The copyright owner has no obligation to allow you to use their work, and can refuse permission for any reason.

  4. Marking your work

    The two primary reasons for marking your work are to ensure that those accessing your images are clear that copyright exists and that they know who to contact to obtain permission.

    1. Contact information

      We often receive enquiries from individuals and organisations wishing to use specific photos, but who are unable to trace the owner. It seems that many images are marked as ‘copyright image do not reproduce without permission’, but that the photographer omitted to include their contact details. This is frustrating to the person wishing to use the image and also means that the photographer may miss out on reproduction fees and exposure.

    2. Copyright notices

      We do recommended that you mark your work with a copyright notice, as this makes it clear that copyright exists, and helps to deter infringement. Please see our fact sheet P-03: Using copyright notices for information on wording you notices.

      For traditional prints, it is customary to use a stamp to mark the copyright notice and the copyright owners contact details on the back of the print

      If you display your photos online, you may choose to use photo editing software to place a simple copyright notice across the image, (typically this will appear in the bottom corner). Ideally it should include the address of the web site so that it is clear where to go to find contact details.

      For electronic images, it is also possible to include the copyright/contact details in the file properties. Under Windows for example, right clicking on a image will allow you to bring up the properties dialogue where you may enter details about the file, (though this will only work with certain file types). More typically, your image software will provide a way to insert comments into the file; this is preferred as these are harder to remove.

      Watermarking may be worth considering if you have a lot of valuable images on your site.

  5. Model release forms

    An individual has certain rights to control the use of their image. The specific details will vary from one country to another depending on national legislation, although the general rule seems to be to protect a person against defamatory or offensive use of their image.

    If you intend to sell or distribute images that include people, then it is worth getting your subjects to sign a model release form as this will protect you against any comeback.

    A search on Google for ‘Model Release Forms’ should reveal a number of example documents that you can use.

 

I am a professional musician i understand copyright. This will not be allowed

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If I take pictures people are free to do with them as they wish except pull a profit, I don't see the point of going after someone who posts my pictures in another forum as long as they credit the work.

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If I take pictures people are free to do with them as they wish except pull a profit, I don't see the point of going after someone who posts my pictures in another forum as long as they credit the work.

 

That's perfectly within your right to do. It is those that take an image, document, whatever, and don't ask permission and make some very ignorant, and frankly stupid, assumptions (like their own definition of "fair use" or the age of document making it "okay") that will have issues posting them on AVSIM.

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My father is a copyright solicitor it is a big NO ! NO !

 

 

 

That also goes for people who create a video on youtube using PMDG'S log without permisson

 

 

PMDG logo im sure is a trademark. which means this is own by them. Don't use it without there permission.

 

 

It is easy to fall to copright without thinking but just think these guys have a logo for a reason

 

 

Steveo

*******. Using PMDG logo in a video of their airplane a copyright infringement? Where did we come?

Unless poster of a video would claim affiliation... then I just don't get it.

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If you are anal then there is an argument for it. I doubt PMDG would give a rats &@($* though. It's free advertising.

 

 

Sent from my Apple communications device.

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WOW Tom, Cant believe this still happens......and I hope I never ###### you off  :O

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Not too hard to understand. And coming from me, who just walked through the screen on my sliding door for the 3rd time in a week, the rest should find this rule easy to follow.

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Not too hard to understand. And coming from me, who just walked through the screen on my sliding door for the 3rd time in a week, the rest should find this rule easy to follow.

 

Be thankful you didn't walk through the glass...

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I follow all AVSIM rules and will continue to do so. The rules here with respect to copyright make sense from a liability point of view.

 

However, I do have one comment as an aside: we are debating US copyright law which does not extend outside of the US.

 

A further comment about copyright "solicitors"... not specific to the poster here but that particular field of law has degenerated quite a bit whereby much of it is known as copyright trolling now. 2 examples coming immediately to mind: Prenda Law and Voltage Pictures. Also, reference the bogus lawsuit against Austin Myers the creator of Xplane.

 

None-the-less, as the issue at hand is copyright protection for AVSIM, I concur with Tom.

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What is going on that has the moderators so touchy at the moment?

 

One guy posts a document he really shouldn't have and gets publicly hung, drawn and quartered, another posts a not very funny humourous post, and gets banned for thirty days, and a third posts a whole bunch of screen shots and the thread gets promoted to a sticky.

 

Please guys, go easy on the coffee, okay?

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By the same token, the following items may very well be protected by copyright:

 

1.  Aircraft models:  Aircraft manufacturers like Boeing, Airbus, Cessna, etc. own the designs of their aircraft.  Modellers should obtain written permission from the aircraft manufacturers before uploading a model of an aircraft to Avsim.  You can be pretty sure that Microsoft secured the rights to and paid for every aircraft model they used in flight simulator.

 

2.  Liveries:  The liveries are the trademarked property of their respective airlines.  To use or upload those liveries, the repainter should get the written permission of the owning airlines.  That, by the way, is why Microsoft made up a bunch of phony baloney airlines rather than using real world airlines and liveries.  They did not want to pay a licensing fee.

 

3.  Airport models:  The architects who designed a given real airport own the rights to their designs, unless they assigned them to the owners of the airport in question.  Before uploading an AFCAD or orther rendering of an airport, the creator should get permission from the architects of that airport.

 

Consistent with this, I am assuming that AVSIM will immediately remove all infringing aircraft models, liveries and scenery from their site.  Furthermore, I am assuming that AVSIM will not longer accept advertising from, review, or in any way support third party developers who sell aircraft, liveries and scenery without first obtaining permission from the copyright holders.

 

I am also assuming that AVSIM will no longer publish photos or screenshots of aircraft without first securing permission from the photographer, the airlines and the aircraft maker.

 

To do otherwise would be wildly inconsistent with AVSIM's declarations that it respects the copyrights of other parties.

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*subscribes*

 

Don't want to miss a second of this one.  :P

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By the same token, the following items may very well be protected by copyright:

 

1.  Aircraft models:  Aircraft manufacturers like Boeing, Airbus, Cessna, etc. own the designs of their aircraft.  Modellers should obtain written permission from the aircraft manufacturers before uploading a model of an aircraft to Avsim.  You can be pretty sure that Microsoft secured the rights to and paid for every aircraft model they used in flight simulator.

 

2.  Liveries:  The liveries are the trademarked property of their respective airlines.  To use or upload those liveries, the repainter should get the written permission of the owning airlines.  That, by the way, is why Microsoft made up a bunch of phony baloney airlines rather than using real world airlines and liveries.  They did not want to pay a licensing fee.

 

3.  Airport models:  The architects who designed a given real airport own the rights to their designs, unless they assigned them to the owners of the airport in question.  Before uploading an AFCAD or orther rendering of an airport, the creator should get permission from the architects of that airport.

 

Consistent with this, I am assuming that AVSIM will immediately remove all infringing aircraft models, liveries and scenery from their site.  Furthermore, I am assuming that AVSIM will not longer accept advertising from, review, or in any way support third party developers who sell aircraft, liveries and scenery without first obtaining permission from the copyright holders.

 

I am also assuming that AVSIM will no longer publish photos or screenshots of aircraft without first securing permission from the photographer, the airlines and the aircraft maker.

 

To do otherwise would be wildly inconsistent with AVSIM's declarations that it respects the copyrights of other parties.

 

 

You may well be the next candidate for a 30 days ban from AVSIM, but I'm thankful you're telling the truth and putting things into perspective.

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By the same token, the following items may very well be protected by copyright:

3.  Airport models:  The architects who designed a given real airport own the rights to their designs, unless they assigned them to the owners of the airport in question.  Before uploading an AFCAD or orther rendering of an airport, the creator should get permission from the architects of that airport.

This is the first I have ever heard of this condition. Usually designs belong to the client that ends up paying for it, not the architect. Is this common in the US, or something made up? Please quote an example if possible.

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Consistent with this, I am assuming that AVSIM will immediately remove all infringing aircraft models, liveries and scenery from their site. Furthermore, I am assuming that AVSIM will not longer accept advertising from, review, or in any way support third party developers who sell aircraft, liveries and scenery without first obtaining permission from the copyright holders.

 

It is exactly this type of sanctimonious post that causes us to shut topics like this down, which I will now do. We have tried to walk a balanced line for nearly 17 years between these exact issues. Uploading a fully copyrighted Boeing document to our servers puts us at risk. Someone posting an image of a Boeing a/c in a flight simulator is an entirely different matter.

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