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Manny

Question for Real World Pilots

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I've always been curious as to why you real world pilots out there use flight simulator? Is it just for entertainment or do you get any benefit to apply to real flight. Having a real world license to fly would be the ultimate and flight simulation can't come close to the thrill of actually flying (IMHO). Basically I would just like to know your attitude toward flight simulation.Jim

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I'm private rated working on instrumentI think pilots like Flight Sim. because it's 1. Cheaper 2. let's them sim fly aircraft that they have never flown before, and 3. I think it helps a little bit. Not so much for your private license for me at least, but seems to be really helpful for your instrument rating. (If of course you fly mostly IFR flights in FS)Jeff USAF

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Guest allblack

What a great question.I must admit, I've seen RW pilots saying through these threads that they sim a lot, and I've often wondered why.CheersTim

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Guest aca_dia

85% of my use is for interment instrument skills/procedures refreshing. It is really handy if I am coming up on recurrent training and want to get my head straight on a particular skill (approach type, odd hold entry, etc) I don

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I can "fly" on the computer three or fours hours a day if I wish. I can't do that in the real a/c. Fuel, maintenance, prep time, etc. all tip the scale towards lots of sim time. Besides, flying is a blast! When you've got the bug, you get your fix where you can. I love any form of flying. The computer is just the most readily available alternative to burning up hours in the real thing.good question

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Guest jlwoodward

I have 700 hours in a C150 and 182, plus an instrument rating. Several years ago my eyesight failed so I gave it up. FS9 on a good computer and with a good add-on aircraft is as close as you can get to real flying, and you don't get beat up by all the wind and turbulence. Try greasing an airplane like the C310- it probably takes as much skill as the real one does. Other reasons- you could live somewhere like Florida but do your flying in Alaska.

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I have used it for to practice for every rating I have gotten (multi instrument ,commercial , almost cfi now).I used fs4 in my primary training to break the "turn the steering wheel, yoke properly positioned into wind" syndrom early students usually show with about 2 hours of non stop takeoffs on the sim. I practiced the procedures for ground reference maneuvers (which are much harder to do on the sim), and xwind technique. I used it for instrument scan and practicing holds,navigation,approaches etc. in my instrument training. Going back and looking at your track afterwards-or the ability to pause the sim to reinforce aspects is very valuable.When I bought my Beech Debonair in 1994 (see in avsim downloads-30,000+)I recreated my panel from photographs (including the actual instruments) and made a faithful recreation of the systems and instrumentation with the help of Reality xp and James Eden. When I got my Baron last year I did the same-it helped with a very quick transition.I used it to practice the commercial manuevers (again much harder in the sim) and for the multi procedures and manuevers-nothing like some quick engine failures with pitch, power,drag, identify, verify, feather, to get in the habit.When I take a trip to an unfamiliar part of the US-I always fly the approach on the sim first-get an idea of the terrain, look of the airport, and instrument approaches.Right now in the Civil Air Patrol-I have developed a program that allows CAP members to practice grid searches (search and rescue) practice on the sim-we have a session once a month.Using the reality xp apollo gps which is the same the CAP uses sure helps practice.When it gets winter in my neck of the country it is pretty hard to fly at all for a couple months (unless luck/weather/schedule come together which they rarely do). The sim helps keep the cobwebs off during these down times.In short-I use it all the time to reinforce aspects of real flying!There are some things it still can't create-seat of the pants feel for instance-but there are a heck of a lot of aspects that are close enough to be extremely useful.....http://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpg

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Guest

Not a real world pilot yet but a sim gives you the opportunity to fly any aircraft available and practice. repetition makes you a better pilot, and the simulator can create a pilot out of anybody, all it takes is practiceI have really no interest in flying small props and flight sim gives me the ability to fly jets, in real life I would have to spend years flying little props before given the chance to fly a jet.

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Guest DNelson

No one has mentioned the most important advantage yet -- you can drink a beer while flying on the computer.Seriously, the old Fly! and FS98 were of great help when I was working on my instrument rating, especially holding patterns and approaches.

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Helloi just wanna give my 2 cents :-)i did my VFR PPL last summer, it was one of the best things i could do! I know flightsims since commodore 64, man that was a time :-)ups, back to the questions:since i am a real world PPL, flying with fs2004 is more fun, you just get a other view of all the things in fs2004, strange but true in my case :-)also i used the sim to practice, every flight i had to prepair i did in fs2004 with the Switzerland Professional Scenery, it was very helpfull what kind of landscape i could expect in places i did not know, also i could watch out for good "fixpoints"The fs2004 is very helpfull to train VOR/NDB "proceeders"Its also very nice to keep the emergency proceeds up to date!!The big one thing i miss in FS2004 is the feeling! You can not fly with your "but" we love to say! :-)Summary: I think it dosent matter if you are a small PPL pilot or a ATP Pilot, if you have ever been in the sim world you will always like it, because it gives you so much freedom in choice where and with what you gonna fly......and on which crazy path lol :-)GreetsMcDanielsorry for the bad grammer....

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I've been simming for years and I got my Private Pilot Liscense Oct. 2004. Well I guess for me simming is the reason for my pursueing of real world experience rather than the other way around. It's true that sim does not really help real world VFR a lot. But I'd say it's very helpful with practicing procedures. Other than that, the rest is obvious. It's cheaper...and also hard as I would try, when would I ever be able to fly a 737NG into Munich and turn around and hop to Sion in a KingAir 200 in real life?Jason Zhang

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Guest Kefuddle

Generally, since I started to fly, I have found FS9 less and less interesting. I think to a certain extent it is because much of the wonder has gone...replaced by knowledge and fact. Also, there is very little value in practicing much on the sim except procedure, instrument navigation and instrument scan; frankly Elite and RANT are generally better all round tools for those aspects. Personally I have reached a stage where I can look at most aspects of FS see straight through it. However, it can be fun to occasionally download an adventure and see what happens with the unexpected.However, I maintain a tacit interest in the development of FS and X-plane and I would consider looking at one or two of the heavy representations for panel familiarity should I be lucky enough to land an airline job interview.

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>I've always been curious as to why you real world pilots out>there use flight simulator? Because if you have to pay big $$$ for every hour of real flight then using FS comes handy .... and cheap !!!You should rather direct this question to professional pilots like Peter Sidoli or Kevin Au who not only use FS but also fly (probably almost daily) for living. Their case is harder to justify ;-)Michael J.WinXP-Home SP2,AMD64 3500+,Abit AV8,Radeon X800Pro,36GB Raptor,1GB PC3200,Audigy 2

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I am a former commercial rated VFR pilot with about 250 hours. I was forced to give it up because of physical issues.In your comment about VFR not being much help I'd have to say I disagree. The VFR flight planning (with a different planner) by hand with charts or computer or both help with navigation and pilotage principles such as checkpoint recognition and dynamic plan/course corrections. In controlled airports procedures still apply in comm and pattern merging and they can be practiced in FS including traffic avoidance by turning on AI and acquiring a good set of at least GA AI models and plans.You might want to take a look at bush flying scenarios as well at conferences here and other sites.

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Guest 737_200_Pilot

I agree with the rest, definately helps you learn and stay proficient at IFR procedures.Airline Transport PilotB-737 Type Rating

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Having recently completed my fATPL and weeks away from that elusive first job, I use FS to keep both interested and in practise.The sensation of flying is very average, as are most flight models, however, just being in the right state of mind and making sure I think about and consider everything I would be doing in the real aircraft helps keep the mind sharp. It was commented during my training (particularly the IR) that I had very good situational awareness, that I put down almost entirely to FS.Oh, I also enjoy being able to do all those things I couldn't/wouldn't be allowed to do in real life, it's fun.Ian

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Real flying is very serious stuff. I look at weather on my intended route about 4-5 days out (on TV, etc.), then as I get within the 24 hour period of my flight I'm getting TAF's which I'm constantly watching and using for decision making. There's checking all the IFR and VFR charts for currency, then when at the plane about 30 minutes doing a pre-flight and getting organized (this is a Cessna 172). Clearance Delivery, taxi to the active is usually a 3/4 mile event (more time), watching control positions for whatever wind is present and looking for other a/c while keeping the ATC chat from tower to other a/c in the foreground. Run-up is another 10 minutes, IFR release when I call that I'm ready, wait for my turn to be given permission to take the active, initial headings and altitude, take-off and contact departures. Lots going on before I even get off the ground and it's all major serious stuff with zero tolerance for error.In FS, I do the opposite. Start FS with me on the active and I'm off, It's not a substitute for real flying, it's a fun thing that I can relax with when I get home from work. Plus the added bonus of realistic instrument flying that adds to currency (not legally though, FS has no recognition for currency in the FAA's eyes).One's serious, the other's fun. And sometimes it is interesting to actually go through the entire start-up procedure of something that I would never fly.Bruce.

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1. $$$$$$$$. Even with a multitude of addon's, the cost of flightsim is minimal. Real world cost per hour to say nothing of maitenance and other requirements is only exceeded by what I spend realtive to the cost of having a wife.2. I have owned a J3 Cub and Older model 172. I never will be able to own a Gulfstream V, DC3, Pilatus, Airbus or 747-400, but can have a virtual experience with them through FlightSim.3. A learning experience relative to High altitude, International, and high speed flights which again I will never be able to experience in the real world, but is pretty well simulated in flightsim.4. VatSim may help one's communication skills for real world flight.I am sure there are many others, but I do think flightsim offers a learning experience which is of some slight value in the real world. After all, good piloting I believe requires as much mental practice as physical practice anyway. Of course, too much practice may have one hunting for mouse buttons instead of the real thing.Happy flying:RTH

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Guest TRK3586

I'm currently working on my private license and I'm hopefully another 2 solo cross countries from getting there. I tried to post my pics on here from my first solo cross country, but that didn't really work out.In terms of using FS, I think it is an excellent tool for use with IFR as well as VFR training, (that's a pilot talking who's at the bottom of the food chain :) ). I've been using FS since FSFW 95, and I've come a long way since then. With some help from professionals in the industry that I met online, I've already learned how to fly a lot of instrument procedures in FS. My CFI is amazed at how much I know about instrument procedures already. I attribute my knowledge to a certain dispatcher who works in the industry. I'm enrolled in a 141 flight school right now, and this semester we're starting Instrument courses. Because of my use of FS, I think I have a leg up ahead of most of the kids in my class. I was explaining DP and STAR charts to a classmate of mine the other day. My CFI is always telling me to "try it out in flight sim tonight and we'll do it tomorrow" --He also believes FS is an excellent way to hone skills. Even though I'm barely a pilot, I've been dreaming of the day that I could respond to one of these posts :)Tim

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Guest Tim W

Pretty much all of my flying these days is work related commercial stuff. I rarely fly GA aircraft for pleasure as it's too expensive in Europe. For relaxation and fun I prefer the computer. That way I can fly aircraft I will never have the opportunity for fly in real life. Vintage props are my passion but also the odd old airliner but now and again I succumb to a trip in the PMDG 737 as well.Horses for courses!Cheershttp://members.chello.nl/t.westnutt/realair1.gif

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Guest av84fun

<>I'm surprised to read that. I was an Elite user for many years...almost from the beginning of that sim and believe that MSFS passed them up long ago in almost every catagory from flight dynamics (when you thin down to the best of the breed)to panel functionality. Of course from a scenery point of view FS9 blows Elite away. And there is the price issue...like Elite is 4-5 times more money.Just IMHO.Regards,Jim

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Guest Kefuddle

Yes well, The point is with instrument scan practice (IFR), the secenery is irelevant, but detail like lag in the VSI is not. Elite understand this. Indeed, there is little distraction when flying Elite; no pauses, no sudden changes in clouds, no suddenly wildly fluctuating altimiters...just practice. In the area if FM there is an another important point overlooked: When practising IFR, you are practising procedure; Elite is written to perform to book numbers, FS isn't. Another key area that Elite excels at is that the interface does not overtly intrude on the flying like it does in FS. It takes me three-five times longer to select a frequency, squawk, QNH in FS than in Elite and about 1.5 times longer in Elite than in RL (approx of course).Elite Core is

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Guest aca_dia

You can pretty much achieve the same environment with Fs9. Turn off detailed clouds and turn down the eye candy. Set visibility to 1/16 and overcast from the surface to 20000

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Guest 737_Pilot

Lucky for me what I fly has a Collins EFIS so>with Rxp Jl2 gauges in something like the FSD Cheyenne (or the>very nice Collins panel in the Aeroworx B200) I get super>smooth instruments and a panel that matches what I really fly.Give me a screenshot of the two panels will ya, I'm interested in what those avionics look like?And please make it in 1024x768 so I can see it, thanks.

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