ErichB

Cargo ship timelapse over 30 days

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I saw it on one of my random youtube surfings. It is beautiful and I hope he does more of them. :cool:

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Thanks for sharing this... very cool.

When I first saw the post's title, I thought someone had done this in FSX/P3D with Hendrick's AI Shipping.  Can't imagine doing that over 30 days, but it would be cool!

 

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Saw this on Facebook the other day, very beautiful and interesting.  Lots of traffic on the shipping routes, amazing to watch this ship weave its way in the traffic and make its way to its docking berths.

John

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Just a spectacular display! So difficult to find night skies such as those living in a large city. Thanks for that.

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18 minutes ago, tamsini said:

Just a spectacular display! So difficult to find night skies such as those living in a large city. Thanks for that.

I bet this video will get lots of views over time.  I felt one with the crew while watching the video as they traveled the seven seas.  What a life working on a cargo ship must be.  I am curious at how many knots these ships average.  I know our large carriers can travel over 30 knots, I've been on ferries that have traveled over 40 knots on San Francisco bay.  My last ship voyage was the Dover ferry which traveled less than 20 knots in a crowded English Channel in June.  It was like a small city on board with shops and delis.  Very smooth ride even though the channel had whitecaps and thunder.  No real sense of motion onboard.  The Dover ferries were the largest ships I have ever been on, that moved anyway.  I have been on larger aircraft carriers at dock and the battleship Missouri.  I have also traveled on a small submarine in Hawaii plunging to a depth of 100 feet for my daughter's birthday.

John

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My favorite book growing up was "The Dove" by Robin Lee Graham, about a sixteen year old boy who sets off to sail around the world.  I've read it many times, and saw the movie directed by Gregory Peck.  It was a great book that allowed me to visualize the world in my teens in a great way, it's what inspired me to take many a trip to Europe.  National Geographic had many articles on his voyage and was a sponsor.  Late in the voyage he traded in his first sailboat for a larger one.  During the voyage he meets his wife.  He wrote a follow up book called "Home is the Sailor", about his move to Montana after his episodic journey.  They are good books for the adventurer in us.  Sailing is akin to flying, I've sailed once on lake Tahoe and loved the feeling of sailing, the feeling of moving with the wind, it feels like you are in the air.

Another good book, if you can find it, is "Two Against The Western Ocean", about the Sopranino, a small sailboat sailed across the Atlantic from England to the US East Coast by Patrick Elam and Colin Moody.  It's written tongue in cheek, with good British humor, quite an adventure story.  At some point in my life I will buy a small sailboat to sail on Lake Pleasant here in Arizona.  I know how to sail, having read so many books on the subject, and would love to spend a few hours on the lake during our cool fall season.  It's so relaxing to be under the wind, sailing like sailors of old.

John

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1 hour ago, Cactus521 said:

I am curious at how many knots these ships average.  I know our large carriers can travel over 30 knots, I've been on ferries that have traveled over 40 knots on San Francisco bay.  My last ship voyage was the Dover ferry which traveled less than 20 knots in a crowded English Channel in June. 

I'd imagine heavy ships like those don't travel very fast. I was on a cruise ship back in 2007, and we were only doing maybe 22 knots, if that. I'd be surprised if these ships would go faster, being much heavier.

1 hour ago, Cactus521 said:

No real sense of motion onboard.

For the most part, I didn't really feel any sense of motion on board that cruise, either. Only one instances when the seas were rough that I did. I was just floating around in a swimming pool, and not only could you see the ship rock from side to side from looking at the way the water in the pool was flowing, without even trying, I was moving from side to side in the pool.

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27 minutes ago, Cactus521 said:

My favorite book growing up was "The Dove" by Robin Lee Graham, about a sixteen year old boy who sets off to sail around the world.  I've read it many times, and saw the movie directed by Gregory Peck.  It was a great book that allowed me to visualize the world in my teens in a great way, it's what inspired me to take many a trip to Europe.  National Geographic had many articles on his voyage and was a sponsor.  Late in the voyage he traded in his first sailboat for a larger one.  During the voyage he meets his wife.  He wrote a follow up book called "Home is the Sailor", about his move to Montana after his episodic journey.  They are good books for the adventurer in us.  Sailing is akin to flying, I've sailed once on lake Tahoe and loved the feeling of sailing, the feeling of moving with the wind, it feels like you are in the air.

Another good book, if you can find it, is "Two Against The Western Ocean", about the Sopranino, a small sailboat sailed across the Atlantic from England to the US East Coast by Patrick Elam and Colin Moody.  It's written tongue in cheek, with good British humor, quite an adventure story.  At some point in my life I will buy a small sailboat to sail on Lake Pleasant here in Arizona.  I know how to sail, having read so many books on the subject, and would love to spend a few hours on the lake during our cool fall season.  It's so relaxing to be under the wind, sailing like sailors of old.

John

If you like stuff such as that, if you can find a copy of it, there is a very nice book in a similar vein titled Very Willing Griffin by ex Merchant Navy sailor David Blagden, which is the tale of him entering the 1972 Ostar single-handed Transatlantic race in a tiny Hunter 19 sailboat. It's out of print but places such as Abe Books have copies of it from time to time. Well worth a read.

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For me this year was "Planes, Trains and Automobiles", added were the ocean ferries. I've been aboard all sorts of craft this year, probably my busiest year since my thirties.  And fortunately everything was seamless, no delays during my entire travels this year.  My tour of Europe just flowed from country to country, with a few traffic buildups but not bad.  I took vaporettos in Venice, ferries in the channel, boats in Capri, quite the year of a lifetime.  It's taken me months to settle back into a routine at home in Phoenix.

John

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