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Bobsk8

A2A Comanche Run up

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I was thinking today, getting ready for my second flight this morning in the Comanche, that whenever I get to the entrance to the runway, I always do an engine runup, in fact, I wouldn't even think about taking off without doing that. It is just the training I had when I got my PPL many years ago, kicking in I guess, because flying the Comanche is so similar to flying a real aircraft, at least for me. 

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BOBSK8             MSFS 2020 ,    ,PMDG 737-600-800 Fenix A320, FSLTL , TrackIR ,  Avliasoft EFB2  ,  ATC  by PF3  ,

A Pilots LIfe V2 ,  CLX PC , Auto FPS, ACTIVE Sky FS,  PMDG DC6 , A2A Comanche, , Milviz C 310

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Same here. Knowing a failure is probable and all. I'd hate to have to crash land (again) 😉

It is a remarkable product. I even check the Hobbs meter before I start the engine. Ya know. So I can get charged the correct amount when I return to the FBO.

Edited by RichieFly
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Richard Chafey

 

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I understand exactly what you mean Bob.

Ive never flown a Comanche in real life but I do have time in the Piper Archer II. I find myself using the same slight throttle nudge on engine start that I used in the Archer and it works!

For me, the Comanche is the nearest thing you can get to flying a light aircraft without leaving the ground.

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Same, I do the run-up without fail. Though I will fully admit that one of my magnetos was dropping about 180 RPM (compared to the other at about 80 RPM) and I still flew because I was too impatient. I'll slot that under "Things I wouldn't do in real life." 

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1 hour ago, Bobsk8 said:

I was thinking today, getting ready for my second flight this morning in the Comanche, that whenever I get to the entrance to the runway, I always do an engine runup, in fact, I wouldn't even think about taking off without doing that. It is just the training I had when I got my PPL many years ago, kicking in I guess, because flying the Comanche is so similar to flying a real aircraft, at least for me. 

Mystery of  airplanes stuck motionless on active runway is solved! Its Bob doing runup ! :)))))


flight sim addict, airplane owner, CFI

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14 minutes ago, Dermot McClusky said:

Same, I do the run-up without fail. Though I will fully admit that one of my magnetos was dropping about 180 RPM (compared to the other at about 80 RPM) and I still flew because I was too impatient. I'll slot that under "Things I wouldn't do in real life." 

Switch to the fine wire plugs, they are more expensive, but who cares. 🙂

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BOBSK8             MSFS 2020 ,    ,PMDG 737-600-800 Fenix A320, FSLTL , TrackIR ,  Avliasoft EFB2  ,  ATC  by PF3  ,

A Pilots LIfe V2 ,  CLX PC , Auto FPS, ACTIVE Sky FS,  PMDG DC6 , A2A Comanche, , Milviz C 310

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2 minutes ago, Bobsk8 said:

Switch to the fine wire plugs, they are more expensive, but who cares. 🙂

My digital pilot already took out a home equity loan to pay for his pilot addiction, there's no way he can afford fancy upgrades!

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I have to admit I stay on the normal plugs... just for the fun of it 😄 And yes it's the first plane I enjoy and really do the walkaround and runup everytime... you never know what your Comanche is offering to you... an old rag in the intake... a broken rudder linkage... had them all...

Cheers T.

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I know I need to work on my landings, but how does everyone feel on the amount of float. Certainly more than all my other GA aircraft. Does this seem accurate to real life?


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19 minutes ago, SolRayz said:

I know I need to work on my landings, but how does everyone feel on the amount of float. Certainly more than all my other GA aircraft. Does this seem accurate to real life?

I'm not an IRL pilot, but comparing my experience to the other planes in the sim I think it's less float for me. If I manage my speed and come in around 85 knots, then go idle over the threshold, I'll usually set down pretty quick. Kind of like the C310, although not quite as brick-like. 

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21 minutes ago, SolRayz said:

I know I need to work on my landings, but how does everyone feel on the amount of float. Certainly more than all my other GA aircraft. Does this seem accurate to real life?

Majority Pipers are low wing, so yeah they are prone to float especially when carry little extra speed kept on approach. IRL  as airflow reduces pilot feels  less pressure on yoke and needs more deflection to keep desired pitch attitude in flare. Unfortunately its nearly impossible to replicate in the sim unless some one come up to very realistic force feed back yoke.


flight sim addict, airplane owner, CFI

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I always do a walk around on the first flight of the day.  Proper runup every flight.

As for floaty landings..  First couple were floaty, entirely due to excessive speed.  As soon as I got that part under control landings were great.

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2 hours ago, SolRayz said:

I know I need to work on my landings, but how does everyone feel on the amount of float. Certainly more than all my other GA aircraft. Does this seem accurate to real life?

Use 80mph for an approach speed, slowing to 75 over the numbers.  You won't float nearly as much, AND you'll make nicer landings.  The manual recommended approach speed of 90mph is simply too fast; you can see that just by looking at the white arc on the airspeed indicator.  I think that 90mph is meant more as an instrument approach speed, not a final speed in the pattern.

This plane behaves more realistically than any other in the sim; the floatiness with extra speed is very accurate to any GA plane.

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Andrew Crowley

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2 hours ago, Stearmandriver said:

Use 80mph for an approach speed, slowing to 75 over the numbers.  You won't float nearly as much, AND you'll make nicer landings.  The manual recommended approach speed of 90mph is simply too fast; you can see that just by looking at the white arc on the airspeed indicator.  I think that 90mph is meant more as an instrument approach speed, not a final speed in the pattern.

This plane behaves more realistically than any other in the sim; the floatiness with extra speed is very accurate to any GA plane.

Yeah I've been doing 90mph approach speeds. I will have to try 80mph. I also have a tendency of coming in too high on approach which is not helping.


Intel i7 10700K | Asus Maximus XII Hero | Asus TUF RTX 3090 | 32GB HyperX Fury 3200 DDR4 | 1TB Samsung M.2 (W11) | 2TB Samsung M.2 (MSFS2020) | Arctic Liquid Freezer II 280mm AIO | 43" Samsung Q90B | 27" Asus Monitor

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8 hours ago, sd_flyer said:

Majority Pipers are low wing, so yeah they are prone to float

Unless it is a Hershey Bar Cherokee as they turn into house bricks with power off full flaps low and slow.

But as far as I know we do not have any early PA28s with the Hershey Bar wing in the game yet.

  

6 hours ago, Stearmandriver said:

The manual recommended approach speed of 90mph is simply too fast

90 mph is probably for max gross with a safety factor.

Almost no-one flies max gross in game unless they are doing Neofly missions or something  (as opposed to real life where you often stuck deciding whether to leave luggage or take on less fuel).  Your quoted 80 mph is probably pretty spot on for a typical MSFS spawn of 50% fuel, pilot/copilot and no baggage.

As a very rough rule of thumb if your gross weight is 20% below max the approach speed should be maybe 10% lower.  Alternatively you can take the POH Stall speed for your new lower weight and reduce your approach speed appropriately.  (if you continue to use the "max gross approach speed" at a lower than max gross weight you are obviously going to float for longer simply because you need to wipe off more airspeed before reaching the new onset of stall).

Note we are talking "in game" calculations here - not real life.

 

This article is about Va but the principles are similar:

https://www.aviationsafetymagazine.com/airmanship/finding-maneuvering-speed-at-light-weights/

Edited by Glenn Fitzpatrick

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