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Attitudes Towards Piracy

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I've been reading and participating in a thread about the closure of Megaupload on another website - a rather large fan website dedicated to a certain series of PC strategy games. The thread has grown quite long and is full of people making excuses to justify software piracy, or just plain obfuscating the issue. Myself and another participant have labelled software pirates and "selfish and greedy", and stated we believe the usual laundry list of excuses used to justify piracy are nothing more than a smokescreen for the pirate's desire to obtain something for nothing. I'm rather astonished to find not only are my beliefs in a very small minority, I've actually been attacked in the thread for expressing them. Some of the arguments I've read defending piracy or trying to obfuscate the issue are woeful, and I have to wonder how the minds of these people work?

 

Is piracy really so endemic? Do so many people really think it's acceptable to help themselves to the work of others who expect financial remuneration for their efforts? Don't they view their behaviour as parasitic at best and utterly self defeating at worst?

 

I'm at the point now where I will give my grudging respect to those who admit they pirate stuff just because they can, rather than the delusional idiots who think they are on some kind of moral crusade or try to use some kind of ridiculous logical fallacy to justify piracy.

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Hi.

 

Rather than churn out the usual, 'It's perfectly normal to want something for nothing', I'll say instead that if you want to pay for stuff you are abnormal.

 

It has a bit more of an impact that way around, doesn't it?

 

Personally, I agree with Richard Bach's view: if it's worth having, it's worth paying for.

 

I don't pirate and I'm pretty sure I never will, but I don't have any negative feelings for those who do. What they're doing is after all quite natural.

 

Regards,

D

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I think a lot of this has been recently covered in the thread further down the page!

 

The majority of participants in that (myself included) were very clear that though they were not "pro-piracy", they are worried about the way that sites accused of copyright infringement have been unilaterally closed down or censored as a direct result of the lobbying of large corporations without due process or proper legal recourse - something that bodes ill for the freedom of information on the Internet.

 

MegaUpload was shut down by an authority with no jurisdiction in any of the countries from which it operated, in an operation which destroyed an arguably legitimate business and shut out millions of people from access to their (legit) data, causing harmful ripples to many other businesses and individuals - an operation that as it turns out, was possibly executed illegally and now may collapse because of it.

 

The Pirate Bay was censored at the behest of a large corporate entity whose only interests are self-serving, again demonstrating that freedom of expression and content on the web is under threat from those who would seek to control it for their own ends.

 

In any discussion on piracy, one can surely stand for progressive technological change, for freedom of speech on the Internet, for new ways of buying and selling intellectual property and for challenging the backwards attitude of many publishers, labels and content promotors, the outrageously disproportionate fines and punishments for those prosecuted for piracy/copyright offences and the oft-made and erroneous assumption that 1 illegal download = 1 lost sale without being "pro-piracy".

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To add:

 

Kickstarter is a wonderful example of a technological platform which is successfully funding crowd-sourced projects in music, film and games, bypassing the parasitic publishing middle men and demonstrating that people will gladly pay (and pre-pay!) for that which they think is worth their money.

 

It encourages risk-taking and takes cultural influence away from corporations and puts it back into the hands of artists and consumers and ensures that the intellectual property rights stay with those to whom it should rightly belong - the creator.

 

This is the kind of thing we should look to in the future and it is the kind of thing that the record labels, movie studios and games publishers will fight tooth and nail to prevent as it pushes them another step closer to redundancy.

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My concern was the apparently very large majority of people on the other site who at the very least tacitly condone piracy. It was an eye opener for me.

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I don't pirate and I'm pretty sure I never will, but I don't have any negative feelings for those who do. What they're doing is after all quite natural.

 

On that basis you wouldn't have negative feelings for other types of thieves,- say, those who stole money from you - "what they're doing is after all quite natural?"

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Like many things in this world, piracy is not a black and white matter. I certainly do not condone it, but I also believe that the manner in which is dealt with is reactionary rather than responsive and only throws more fuel on the fire. There are undoubtedly pirates out there that would download something just because they can, which I firmly believe to be the case with pirates of flight simulation products; these are the people who I believe deserve our ire. But there are also those who undoubtedly pirate due to conditions created by shattered marketplaces that no longer seem to accept economic realities. It is a sad truth that in their effort to crack down on piracy, some companies have turned to measures that punish legitimate customers excessively while the pirates avoid such measures. This, in my opinion, is not a problem solely created by the pirates; to rest the blame solely on their shoulders is excessive and unjust. It is my hope that the industries impacted by piracy can resolve the problem without further alienating consumers and perhaps ultimately encouraging rather than discouraging piracy.

 

On that basis you wouldn't have negative feelings for other types of thieves,- say, those who stole money from you - "what they're doing is after all quite natural?"

 

I would say that most people's reaction would not be that of Bishop Myriel; however, I again think that you have to ask yourself to what extent it is being done because of the greed of the individual and to what extent it is being done due to problems in the system itself.

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But there are also those who undoubtedly pirate due to conditions created by shattered marketplaces that no longer seem to accept economic realities.

 

This is something I don't agree with. We're not talking about food, shelter or warmth. We're talking about entertainment products. The draconian DRM, overly expensive or greedy publisher excuses are just a smokescreen. If you don't like the DRM, price or business model then that doesn't give one a cart blanche to download a pirated version.

 

Here's the best article I have read on the subject, it's well worth a read:

 

http://www.tweakguid...m/Piracy_1.html

 

Note especially the part about the game "World of Goo". It addresses all the usual grievances:

 

i) It's from a small indie developer.

ii) It has no DRM.

iii) It is priced very cheap.

iv) It has received good reviews online and has a very respectable Metacritic score.

 

Yet despite this the developers reckon it had a piracy rate of 90%.

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We're not talking about food, shelter or warmth. We're talking about entertainment products.

 

Their status as being necessities or not does not change the way the market functions. Those who steal for these reasons undoubtedly deserve more sympathy, but that's quite another issue.

 

The draconian DRM, overly expensive or greedy publisher excuses are just a smokescreen.

 

I think it would be great to know to such a degree the precise motivations of everyone who pirates; however, I do not believe this to be the case as we cannot read minds. For some it is undoubtedly a smokescreen and excuse, for others it likely isn't.

 

If you don't like the DRM, price or business model then that doesn't give one a cart blanche to download a pirated version.

 

Nor did I claim in my post that it does, or that their motives justify piracy; merely that the actions that large firms have taken have contributed in their own ways to piracy. In the absence of such contributions, all pirates of a particular product would fall squarely into the former camp as I discussed in my previous post.

 

 

I will take a look.

 

Note especially the part about the game "World of Goo". It addresses all the usual grievances:

 

i) It's from a small indie developer.

ii) It has no DRM.

iii) It is priced very cheap.

iv) It has received good reviews online and has a very respectable Metacritic score.

 

Yet despite this the developers reckon it had a piracy rate of 90%.

 

I've already addressed this scenario in my previous post in the sentence directly preceding the one you quoted, so I won't address it again here except to say again that these are the pirates who do not deserve the benefit of the doubt when they steal from indie developers.

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Flight 1seem to have the right idea. 30day money back guarantee so you know you won't get a dud, and you rarely hear about there stuff being "cracked".

 

 

 

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Yaaarrr, I be fed up to the gunwhales wi' bilge-sucking pirates me hearties. Shiver me timbers if their pillaging ways don't be costing me more in doubloons and pieces of eight to get me paws on the finest FSX fare. 'Tis the cat o nine tails they deserve, a taste o' me cutlass, or a trip to Davy Jones' Locker. Savvy?

 

Al

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Pirates are kind of like hoarders. They download and download and download hoarding up a massive library. Truth is they are not even using the majority of their library just hoarding it.

 

That Kim Dotcom guy is still in my country and I think that trial is going to go on for years.

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What i found funny is the fact that you have to watch 7 minutes about anti-piracy when you buy a legit DVD.

 

PS : If you find a way to get free Airsimmer product, please do so. Ex ET member speaking

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What i found funny is the fact that you have to watch 7 minutes about anti-piracy when you buy a legit DVD.

 

PS : If you find a way to get free Airsimmer product, please do so. Ex ET member speaking

 

You are looking to get a ban...

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You are looking to get a ban...

 

No, absolutely not.

 

Just saying that Airsimmer is worst than piracy, they took money from people that love the A320 project, and then didn't care about them. No news, updates, etc... as of today nothing...

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Bendead, I just checked your account and you have been banned from the ET team for some time, strangely enough you tried to log in again 2 days ago. From the comments regarding other ET members you we're 'the troll of the ET Team' Fortunately I never had to deal with you.

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Bendead, I just checked your account and you have been banned from the ET team for some time, strangely enough you tried to log in again 2 days ago. From the comments regarding other ET members you we're 'the troll of the ET Team' Fortunately I never had to deal with you.

 

Of Course !!!

 

A lot of my posts were about bad ET management and bad support. Of course I expected to be ban, negative post when you are minus 1200 feet on a U-boat are always tricky.

 

I spent my money to help an A320 addon maker, but you kept my money and haven't made any progress !

 

So if you are a true gentleman, I will see a refund. If not I will keep destroying your reputation.

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If not I will keep destroying your reputation.

No you won't. All of your posts will now be previewed before you are allowed to post. If that doesn't get your attention, you won't be posting at all...

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Piracy hurts everyone, plain and simple.

 

Look at what PC gaming in general used to be and what it is now. The quality and quantity of games has decreased drastically. Granted, piracy isn't the only reason for that but it is a big one. Now, more games are on consoles where piracy is a bit more difficult.

 

Now, prices go up, DRM usage goes up, and the pirates now use this as justification to continue. There is no excuse for it.

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There is no excuse for it.

 

congrats.gif Sometimes a few words is enough to sum it up.

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software piracy is thievery plain and simple and there is nothing worse than a thief. kill them with fire

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there is nothing worse than a thief.

 

Lol - are you sure about that?

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Yaaarrr, I be fed up to the gunwhales wi' bilge-sucking pirates me hearties. Shiver me timbers if their pillaging ways don't be costing me more in doubloons and pieces of eight to get me paws on the finest FSX fare. 'Tis the cat o nine tails they deserve, a taste o' me cutlass, or a trip to Davy Jones' Locker. Savvy?

 

Al

 

You are a genuine genius! I can't have been the only one to read this in the tone of Jack Sparrow? Specially the last bit!

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Al, ever thought of doing a stint at the Bard's home in Stratford with that prose? You'd make a fortune with the overseas tourists :LMAO: :LMAO: :LMAO: :LMAO:

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.

 

Look at what PC gaming in general used to be and what it is now. The quality and quantity of games has decreased drastically.

 

I dont think that is the case!

 

The indie game scene is booming and there have been more than enough AAA games on the PC in the last year and on the horizon to ensure neither my Xbox nor PS3 have got a look in. Indeed I have lent the Playstation out for over a year now and haven't missed it.

 

I am playing more quality titles on the PC now than I have in a long, long time!

 

The one related thing that does irk enormously are the measures that some publishers are implementing to try and prevent piracy - measures which only ever inconvenience the paying customer and make not one jot of difference to the pirate. Enforcing "always on" drm methods thinlly disguised as "social enhancements" to a game is just rotten and I wish it would stop.

 

Yes Ubisoft, Maxis and Blizzard - I am looking at you.

 

More publishers should take a leaf out of CD Projekts book -treat your customers with respect, offer up support and new content for free beyond the initial launch of the game and you will win loyal, paying, repeat clients.

 

 

To quote Gabe Newell:

 

"We think there is a fundamental misconception about piracy. Piracy is almost always a service problem and not a pricing problem," he said. "If a pirate offers a product anywhere in the world, 24 x 7, purchasable from the convenience of your personal computer, and the legal provider says the product is region-locked, will come to your country 3 months after the US release, and can only be purchased at a brick and mortar store, then the pirate's service is more valuable."

 

I don't see Valve struggling at the moment...

 

Generally speaking, most habitual pirates will continue to do so if they can, regardless of the price or quality of the product. What people need to do is offer their honest customers a top quality product and quality support without invasive DRM. Allowing customers the opportunity for refunds if they are dissatisfied doesn't hurt either!

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