Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

ViperPilot

Asiana 777 Crash: Survivors plan to file Lawsuit against Boeing...

Recommended Posts

Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

Yes, but that culture is ingrained in the US legal system...noone should be surprised.

 

Canada is a little better in that regard, but not by much I grant you.

Share this post


Link to post

I would have thought Asiana would be an easier mark. Sure, fewer seizable assets in the US, but higher likelihood of a big cash verdict?

Share this post


Link to post

Yes, but that culture is ingrained in the US legal system...noone should be surprised.

 

Canada is a little better in that regard, but not by much I grant you.

Two of the lowest lifeforms on Earth: plaintiff's attorneys and criminal defense attorneys. No principles, just cunning.

 

And, you're right, Canada's not much better. Stay away from Quebec and its French civil law system, and one can manage.

Share this post


Link to post

I don't understand...:

"Hersman (National Transportation Safety Board chief) said analysis of the cockpit voice recorder indicated that until only shortly before impact, the pilots were unaware that the jet was flying far below the target speed and altitude for a safe landing. She added that there was no malfunction of the autopilot, auto-throttle or flight director systems."

Also:

"The National Transportation Safety Board has said pilots told investigators they realized the approach speed was low and set the auto-throttle to correct it, but realized too late that the aircraft speed never increased."

So WHEN exactly did they realize the speed being low? And WHEN exactly did they realize that the change didn't help? Last second changes don't work with jet engines... It still seems like pilot error to me.....

Share this post


Link to post

So WHEN exactly did they realize the speed being low? And WHEN exactly did they realize that the change didn't help? Last second changes don't work with jet engines... It still seems like pilot error to me.....

 

This does seem to be the question everyone wants an answer too, and I agree that this was definitely pilot error.

 

Does anyone know how long it takes the 777 engines to spool up from an idle or just above idle condition?

Share this post


Link to post

And my other issue -clearly visible on the latest animation- is that they came in way too low, so of course the speeds fell down when they were descending -100FPM instead of -700 FPM....

Share this post


Link to post

ViperPilot, on 17 Jul 2013 - 12:49 PM, said:

... for apparent 'malfunction' of the Auto Throttles, thereby causing the crash of the Asiana 777 at San Francisco Intl. Airport on 7/6/2013:

Amazing that......We all know this system was working perfect without really knowing, call it a hunch.

 

Boeing could do what Amtrak did and file a lawsuit against those who filed a lawsuit against Boeing when it is found that Boeing was not at fault. This worked for Amtrak when they were sued for an accident caused by kids switching a train onto a siding. Amtrak turned around and sued everyone that tried to so Amtrak for that incident.

Share this post


Link to post

Amazing that......We all know this system was working perfect without really knowing, call it a hunch.

 

Boeing could do what Amtrak did and file a lawsuit against those who filed a lawsuit against Boeing when it is found that Boeing was not at fault. This worked for Amtrak when they were sued for an accident caused by kids switching a train onto a siding. Amtrak turned around and sued everyone that tried to so Amtrak for that incident.

Wouldn't that be something... the law firm handling the case undoubtedly would appeal, tying the litigation up for years.

 

I think Deb summed it up pretty succinctly in her last press briefing.

Share this post


Link to post

The only one area I can come up with that Boeing could make as an improvement is a design flaw in the passenger seating....

 

When you are sitting on an airline there is a horizontal metal bar in the seat in front of you that is about shin level, when an airplane crashes in a survivable crash like this one then majority of the injuries come from broken legs suffered from impact with this metal bar. When an aircraft catches fire it becomes very difficult to evacuate an aircraft when you have broken a leg (or both) on that metal bar.

 

This design has been known for years and an easy fix. basic seat design hasn't really changed since the B707 other then better materials and in-seat entertainment, other then that no quantum leap forward, whereas the rest of the aircraft has become far more advanced compared to the basic seating. Wouldn't take much to have composites and padding in the seat in front of you to protect your legs so you have a better chance at evacuating.

 

This issue will come up in this lawsuit. Every accident there are always ways to make improvements and this is one area I think should be done.

Share this post


Link to post

 

 


Does anyone know how long it takes the 777 engines to spool up from an idle or just above idle condition?

 

Not only the engines spooling up. Also have to push 200 Tons up in speed.

Share this post


Link to post

I don't understand...:

 

"Hersman (National Transportation Safety Board chief) said analysis of the cockpit voice recorder indicated that until only shortly before impact, the pilots were unaware that the jet was flying far below the target speed and altitude for a safe landing. She added that there was no malfunction of the autopilot, auto-throttle or flight director systems."

 

Also:

 

"The National Transportation Safety Board has said pilots told investigators they realized the approach speed was low and set the auto-throttle to correct it, but realized too late that the aircraft speed never increased."

 

So WHEN exactly did they realize the speed being low? And WHEN exactly did they realize that the change didn't help? Last second changes don't work with jet engines... It still seems like pilot error to me.....

Why did they set the auto throttle I mean if I'm slow I shove the power up myself not wait for the AT to do it.

Share this post


Link to post

"The National Transportation Safety Board has said pilots told investigators they realized the approach speed was low and set the auto-throttle to correct it, but realized too late that the aircraft speed never increased."

 

So WHEN exactly did they realize the speed being low? And WHEN exactly did they realize that the change didn't help? Last second changes don't work with jet engines... It still seems like pilot error to me.....

Exactly so. With the Autothrottle only "Armed" and not "Activated" engine power will only be controllable by the actual power lever positions...

 

...which since they were at flight idle until just the last few seconds clearly indicate pilot inattention at the best, and near-criminal negligence at worst.

Share this post


Link to post

Yesterday, there was an article published by a Forum Admin(?) member, relating to a letter that a US simulator instructor hired by a Korean airline had posted back to him regarding his grave concerns for some of the skills/training methods of aircrew in this particular region. Was an interesting read but I've not been able to find it since. Has it since been deleted?

Share this post


Link to post

I would have thought Asiana would be an easier mark. Sure, fewer seizable assets in the US, but higher likelihood of a big cash verdict?

From what I've read, most of the passengers would have to sue Asiana under South Korean laws, which probably don't allow as high rewards as in the US legal system.

 

See why here:

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/07/15/compensation-payouts-for-asiana-crash-likely-to-be-vastly-different-for/

Share this post


Link to post

Just got done watching a couple air crash investigation episodes about Korean airlines. Wow.

 

This is not an isolated incident. Negligence, if this turns out to be the case here somehow relates to culture. Weird that's possible when it is lives at risk.

 

 

Sent from my Apple communications device.

Share this post


Link to post