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Nathan3219

How short can a 777 land?

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If you want a challenge try flying the left handed pattern and landing on 02R at Santos Dumont in Rio de Janeiro. It's 4341 feet long so you'll get a 1000 more than 7N1 but even light it's tough.

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My son just landed an empty 777F at 7N1 and used less than half of the 3269 ft runway

 

How would you take it off again? Or wouuld you just taxi to the junk yard?  :smile:

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My son just landed an empty 777F at 7N1 and used less than half of the 3269 ft runway. Is this realistic? If you want to try it you'll have to get the freeware 7N1 by Jim Cook from the library.

 

Here's a picture of it, he touched down right at the beginning of the threshold.

http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=9vglsy&s=9#.V8eb7a0S2M8

 

Have a look in the FCOM 1 from page 447/1210 Section 32 but i would guess around 17-1900m

 

Michael Moe

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My son just landed an empty 777F at 7N1 and used less than half of the 3269 ft runway.

 

I used to drive by that airport all the time on the way up to Canandaigua and Rochester. Nice.

 

 

 


Is this realistic?

 

It's probably a tiny bit on the short side, since FSX's ground contact model is pretty unrealistic itself, but we've tried to work around this to the best of our ability.

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The thing is the figures in the FCOM include safety margins which are applied to landing and takeoff distances, so they don't provide an accurate minimum. So it's possible you could manage a landing in a surprisingly short distance. It wouldn't be safe to try it in normal circumstances. However there have been instances of large aircraft being flown into very small airfields to be housed in a museum.

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Very interesting :smile: 

I see also that at a maximum landing weight of a B777-300ER at 251,290 kg, on a flaps 30, no wind, dry runway, autobrake Max, the stopping distance is 1400'. On a poor reported braking action runway, this then extends to 3260'. WoW :excl: 

No chance of taking off again, then.

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A tiny bit on the short side?? :blink: How on Earth do you get a 777 to stop in 1500 feet?

 

With 12 really effective brakes under wings with a method to spoil lift. Not sure how this is so shocking. Have a look at the perf charts for many aircraft out there. A lot of them can stop very quickly, but it's neither friendly to passengers, nor the aircraft.

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Well, it's shocking to me!! I thought it was an achievement to get my Flight1 Cessna Citation Mustang in and out of airfields with asphalt runways only 2000 feet long, so clearly I am clueless when it comes to the braking performance of large airliners :smile:

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Persoanlly, I prefer longer rollouts when landing the 737NGX

 

Thought  this  thread was  about  the 777 :Thinking:

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I used to drive by that airport all the time on the way up to Canandaigua and Rochester. Nice

7N1 is almost literally in my backyard! I do avionics work for all of the tenant aircraft there. If someone DID manage to land a 777, I'm sure airport owner Joe Costa would be impressed.

 

Only problem is that his Jet-A tank is only holds 500 gallons, (mainly used for servicing the occasional turbine helicopter who may stop in now and then), so getting refueled might be a problem!😀

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Thought  this  thread was about  the 777 :Thinking:

 

Is it a criminal offence to mention another aircraft in a 777 thread? :huh:

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7N1 is almost literally in my backyard! I do avionics work for all of the tenant aircraft there. If someone DID manage to land a 777, I'm sure airport owner Joe Costa would be impressed.

 

Nice. It's on my bucket list of places to drop into. I flew over it one dark (and distantly stormy - storms over Lake Ontario) night 9 years ago (as of Sunday, actually) on the way up to PEO. That little 152 had a basic six pack, 2 VOR gauges, radios, and that's it. Compared to the flying I've been doing since then, it's been pretty stupid easy with all these newfangled gadgets. I felt like I was cheating when I was flying my commercial certificate long cross country. Back when it was VORs and NDBs only (<grandpa voice>like when I was flying that Spamcan 152...</grandpa voice>), I was actually working the whole flight on a longer cross country. On my commercial cross country, I actually hit up ATC just to have something to do, since the rest was taken care of by the G1000. To be honest, I would've preferred challenging myself with just steam gauges and no GPS, but the DA40 was a little more cost effective to use for the trip.

 

Is it a criminal offence to mention another aircraft in a 777 thread? :huh:

 

Yes. It's against 14 CFR 91.28.

(For those of you who don't get it. FAR 91.28 does not exist, and I'm joking.)

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Hi there,

 

i had the chance to fly a B777 F full flight sim. To make it a little challanging the sim techi gave me an engine failure so i landed @ Mainz-Finthen. It is alittle airport just north west of EDDF. The airfield has a 3000 feet runway. I was able to land and come to a full stop. So i presume that as "realistic" I was quite amazed by the brake power of this plane.

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During initial training on the 737 we landed the simulator on 19L at KSNA and made it with room to spare. Later we had a crew land one 3500 feet down 19R at SNA and stop without incident......well other than landing 3500 feet down 19R. This was all with 737-800s which some feel had poor braking (not me). I think if a 737-800 could do it a 777 at proportional weights could do it. 

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Something like this you mean?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmakSwlYLs0

Or like this...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ap_nyRzEOMI

 

They actually landed a full sized 747-200 there as well.   Of course, taking it off, no-go!   Dimensions of the runway is the following:

 

http://www.randairport.co.za/information/

 

So yes, definitely possible for the 777, but the taking off...

 

Regards

 

Werner

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Yeah, the take off will probably be done with all seats and the galley removed and a different crew from the one that landed it.

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Bit of real world input on this - the 777 is known as a 'good stopper' according to the 3 pilots I've been working with on our 777 Cadet Program. Emirates operate the 773 to Newcastle, UK which is the shortest runway on their network at 2329m or 7641ft and it's a Captain only, max autobrake landing which is a bit daft really as it's usually stopped well BEFORE the Q400s, A320s and 737s that you normally see there! 

 

United operate to Kahului Airport in Hawaii as part of a rotation including HNL and ORD (well they used to, not sure if they do any more) in the 772 and that looks pretty sporty at 2132m or 6995ft! So much so, we include it as the first line flight of the Cadet training program. In reality at the weights you're operating at for the short hop back and forth to HNL the runway length is really no big deal.

 

The most memorable bit of the HNL leg was the very long taxi out to the reef runway and our salty old UA skipper doing the training recounts the first time he went there as a spotty young DC8 flight engineer. The Captain pulled open the DV window and proceeded to light up a huge cigar. By the time they were ready to line up the cigar was just about done so he flicked it out the window, shut the window and called for the before takeoff checklist….

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Bit of real world input on this - the 777 is known as a 'good stopper' according to the 3 pilots I've been working with on our 777 Cadet Program. Emirates operate the 773 to Newcastle, UK which is the shortest runway on their network at 2329m or 7641ft and it's a Captain only, max autobrake landing which is a bit daft really as it's usually stopped well BEFORE the Q400s, A320s and 737s that you normally see there! 

 

United operate to Kahului Airport in Hawaii as part of a rotation including HNL and ORD (well they used to, not sure if they do any more) in the 772 and that looks pretty sporty at 2132m or 6995ft! So much so, we include it as the first line flight of the Cadet training program. In reality at the weights you're operating at for the short hop back and forth to HNL the runway length is really no big deal.

 

The most memorable bit of the HNL leg was the very long taxi out to the reef runway and our salty old UA skipper doing the training recounts the first time he went there as a spotty young DC8 flight engineer. The Captain pulled open the DV window and proceeded to light up a huge cigar. By the time they were ready to line up the cigar was just about done so he flicked it out the window, shut the window and called for the before takeoff checklist….

 

Yep been to HNL a number of times and the taxi to the reef runway is a long one. Its ok when you're leaving but when on arrival after a 10+ hour day of flying (from NJ) you really want to get out of your seat. That taxi to the gate from the reef feels like another hour! Good part is United 777 I was on let you listen to the ATC comms on the approach.

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Not to mention Singapore Airlines just started flying their 777-200ERs into NZWN which only has a 1815 metre runway and is notorious for its windy landings. Granted it stops in YSCB both ways it's still quite impressive.

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HNL uses 4R for arrivals and 8R for departures currently. I think I read something about 8L having construction or a problem but I can't find it. A nice short taxi from the end of 4R to your gate. Reading the story from Ben at Airline2Sim makes me want the -200ER! - David Lee

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HNL uses 4R for arrivals and 8R for departures currently. I think I read something about 8L having construction or a problem but I can't find it. A nice short taxi from the end of 4R to your gate. Reading the story from Ben at Airline2Sim makes me want the -200ER! - David Lee

This is why every preflight includes a look at FAA NOTAMS...., made so much easier with the internet compared to the reams of yellow teletypewriter paper we used to swim though.  Current HNL notam includes !HNL 09/117 HNL RWY 04R/22L CLSD EXC F22 ACFT FOR HICKAM BARRIER MAINTENANCE CERTIFICATION 1609290030-1609290230... plain text: 4R/22L closed until 29 Sep 0230Z for barrier maintenance.

 

just google faa notam and select notam search. easy.

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