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Hi

Kaby lake 7700k leaked performance tests

http://ranker.sisoftware.net/show_device.php?q=c9a598d1bfcbaec2e2a1cebcd9f990a78abd8aba8ac1e780bd90a187f5c8f9dfb68bbb9df5c8f8dea69bab8de88db080a6d5e8d0&l=en

 

Seems to be approx 7% more performance than 6700k Its inside the 4.2-4.5 boost for 7700k agianst the 6700k 4.0-4.2 boost very small or equal IPC.

 

Mems 2400 avx downclock as the Broadwell-E

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Huh?  Sorry, but this makes no sense to me.

 

Regards

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When are Intel and/or AMD going to release a new CPU that has a significant performance increase over the last generation? I can't help thinking that not much has happened since I purchased an i5 2500k powered system way back in 2011.

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Huh? Sorry, but this makes no sense to me.

 

Regards

 

 

Not sure what you mean, but these are early samples, so clock speed may increase closer to launch.

Intel's road map made it clear that Kaby Lake wouldn't be a game changer, just an incremental increase.

 

 

When are Intel and/or AMD going to release a new CPU that has a significant performance increase over the last generation? I can't help thinking that not much has happened since I purchased an i5 2500k powered system way back in 2011.

 

Not really Chris, Skylake is a significant improvement over your 2500k.

 

Cannonlake is said to be the bigger jump. But then More's law is slowing down. There's only so many transistors that can be jammed into a chip. In fact it was Yield Ramp issues that delayed Cannonlake till 2017.  New technology is in the lab, but it will be a while yet.

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CPU IPC isnt the only determinant thats relevant to us though I believe, the memory improvements allied to Skylake had a positive impact on FSX/P3D I think? Anyway, one unverified report doesnt prove anything... :) K

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Is issue isn't mores law it's more down to voltage and heat dispersion. We can get super high clock speeds but you need liquid nitrogen to cool the cpu Also the shrinking market for PC's are more people move to mobile devices. I don't really get the draw your so limited on a phone or tablet. They are great to travel with though.

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Put it this way, when I decide to upgrade from my current i5 4690k @ 4.6Ghz/2GB GTX 770/16GB Hyper X Fury DDR3-1600 RAM powered system (purchased in August 2014), I want double the performance, otherwise paying up to £1000 starts to feel like throwing money down the drain. In fact, it is entirely possible that I would still have been using that i5 2500k powered PC if it hadn't suffered a double motherboard/GPU failure in July 2014 after three years of decent service. My current system is fine, but the increase in performance over the i5 2500k (which was overclocked to 4.3Ghz) wasn't exactly Earth shattering. A GPU upgrade would probably have kept me going for another two years....

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Is issue isn't mores law it's more down to voltage and heat dispersion. We can get super high clock speeds but you need liquid nitrogen to cool the cpu Also the shrinking market for PC's are more people move to mobile devices. I don't really get the draw your so limited on a phone or tablet. They are great to travel with though.

 

 

 

 

Yes it is More's Law. Higher transistor density equates to more heat. And More's Law states that transistor density doubles every two years . There are other limiting factors also of course.

 

http://ibcomp.fis.edu/speed/transist.htm

 

 

Not for much longer. The doubling has already started to falter, thanks to the heat that is unavoidably generated when more and more silicon circuitry is jammed into the same small area.

 

Put it this way, when I decide to upgrade from my current i5 4690k @ 4.6Ghz/2GB GTX 770/16GB Hyper X Fury DDR3-1600 RAM powered system (purchased in August 2014), I want double the performance, otherwise paying up to £1000 starts to feel like throwing money down the drain. In fact, it is entirely possible that I would still have been using that i5 2500k powered PC if it hadn't suffered a double motherboard/GPU failure in July 2014 after three years of decent service. My current system is fine, but the increase in performance over the i5 2500k (which was overclocked to 4.3Ghz) wasn't exactly Earth shattering. A GPU upgrade would probably have kept me going for another two years....

 

Double the performance is asking a lot Chris... What you want and what's feasible are two different things.

 

Transistors are getting so small that the quantum effects become an issue. As I said though, there's tech in the pipeline that will be revolutionary.

 

 

http://www.nature.com/news/the-chips-are-down-for-moore-s-law-1.19338

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Put it this way, when I decide to upgrade from my current i5 4690k @ 4.6Ghz/2GB GTX 770/16GB Hyper X Fury DDR3-1600 RAM powered system (purchased in August 2014), I want double the performance,

 

I remember a time when I was upgrading my PC every year and spending $1,200 each time for a CPU with double the clock speed.  Now I upgrade about every 3-4 years and spend about $700. My understanding is that the laws of physics have made faster clock speeds impractical for consumer level PCs so they have shifted to adding more cores and optimizing what they can instead of faster clock speeds.

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Yes, but it's getting to the point where upgrading to a new PC is no longer cost effective. I am reluctant to fork out another grand if all I am going to get is a 30% increase in performance.

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Then you wait longer between upgrades, that's all.

Cheers!

 

Luke

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That is what I intend to do, Luke. The problem I had last time was that I was forced to upgrade because of the major system failure. I don't want that to happen again. Those three weeks without a PC were three of the longest weeks of my life....

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Don't worry Chris, they say that carbon nanotube CPU's will be able to reach 1 THz and beyond. New life to Moore's Law and you can start spending big money on a regular basis again.  :smile:

 

We can save all the silicone for grotesquely huge boobs!!! I'm a fan of that.

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I went from i7 3770K OCed to 4.5Ghz to i7 6700K OCed to 4.5Hhz in 3 years and saw some improvement with P3D

 

But its not as much as I wanted or expecting.

 

I think we have to wait 6-8 years between upgrades before seeing real big improvements. The positive to this is, you don't have to spend money every 2 years. LOL :)

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I went from i7 3770K OCed to 4.5Ghz to i7 6700K OCed to 4.5Hhz in 3 years and saw some improvement with P3D

 

But its not as much as I wanted or expecting.

 

I think we have to wait 6-8 years between upgrades before seeing real big improvements. The positive to this is, you don't have to spend money every 2 years. LOL :)

Yep.  I don't worry about performance anymore.  I worry about my overclocked CPU degrading because if it fails I can't replace it.  The technology that I am on isn't available.  If my motherboard fails I will have to buy memory, a motherboard and a cpu, and possibly a new OS if I can't get W7 to install.  All for very little performance gain.

 

Kdub

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I went from i7 3770K OCed to 4.5Ghz to i7 6700K OCed to 4.5Hhz in 3 years and saw some improvement with P3D

 

But its not as much as I wanted or expecting.

 

I think we have to wait 6-8 years between upgrades before seeing real big improvements. The positive to this is, you don't have to spend money every 2 years. LOL :)

Thanks for posting that Manny. I am currently on an I7 3770K at 4.5Ghz and was thinking about upgrading. Think I'll just stay with what I have.

Ted

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Yes, but it's getting to the point where upgrading to a new PC is no longer cost effective.

 

 

Recently, Intel hasn't been able to improve single core performance very much from generation to generation. These days, the only way to improve performance is to upgrade one's GPU. And even that approach is getting strangled by the CPU bottleneck. Look at these single thread benchmarks:

 

https://www.cpubenchmark.net/singleThread.html

 

The i7-4790k even beats the i7-6700k by a small amount.

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In Jays example the results are normalised to equivalent fixed frequencies, in Martins example the 6700 results are skewed as benefits from a better motherboard chipset and memory, differing frequencies and boost. The 6700 is slightly slower than the 4790 as the increased heat density of the 6700 delivers less work by around 8% but well compensated for with the later z170 chipset results in as good as or slightly better performance.

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In other words, nobody with an i7 4790k should even be thinking about "upgrading" :wink:

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In other words, nobody with an i7 4790k should even be thinking about "upgrading" :wink:

 

Of course not, no one has said anyone should... unless they are well off enthusiasts that just love new kit.

 

I came from a 3770K, upgraded because my son was having my old rig. Glad I did though, I'm thoroughly thrilled with Skylake and the GTX 980Ti.

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That was just a little side comment, Martin. I wasn't suggesting that anyone on this thread had mentioned it.......but I have seen posts elsewhere to suggest that others have considered it.

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I'm still on a 2500k lol

 

I expect a large perf increase when I upgrade

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Don't know about the sim, not installed yet, but Iv'e just been playing the BF1 beta at between 140 and 180 frames per second on Ultra settings.

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