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birdguy

Thank you for your service...

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Whenever anyone finds out I am retired military they always say, "Thank you for you service."  Sometimes it's a bit embarrassing and for we Vietnam vets about 45 years too late.

That aside; this afternoon I went to the supermarket and a fireman was in behind me in the checkout line.  I turned around and said, "Thank you for your service."  He was a bit taken aback but smiled and said, "Thank you."  I mentioned being retired military I get it a lot and I though fireman and cops deserved it too.

Maybe I can start something here.

Noel

 

Edited by birdguy

I'm first generation Norwegian American.  You know what they say about Norwegians.  You can always tell a Norwegian, but you can't tell him much.

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20 minutes ago, birdguy said:

Whenever anyone finds out I am retired military they always say, "Thank you for you service."  Sometimes it's a bit embarrassing and for we Vietnam vets about 45 years too late.

That aside; this afternoon I went to the supermarket and a fireman was in behind me in the checkout line.  I turned around and said, "Thank you for your service."  He was a bit taken aback but smiled and said, "Thank you."  I mentioned being retired military I get it a lot and I though fireman and cops deserved it too.

Maybe I can start something here.

Noel

 

During the Los Alamos fires I worked for an Insurance company, California Casualty, and we had many displaced insureds in Los Alamos.  I was WAN manager at that time for our Socal, Arizona (where I lived) and Los Alamos New Mexico branches.  Although not a travel job, I was advised travel might be required to set up a new server or to perform some training, I was happy with that, since my previous job was that of a road warrior, a business systems implementation specialist. 

Anyway, the fire happened and it was an emergency.  I happened to be working late in the Arizona office when our claims manager asked if I could fly to Albuquerque, drive to Santa Fe, and set up a claims office there since their Los Alamos office was closed by the fire.  Essentially they wanted me to set up a working business network over the course of the next day.  I agreed to do it if my boss agreed, he did and I flew out, did my piece, went into Los Alamos during the fire to shut down our servers gracefully and power them off completely to avoid smoke damage in the hard drives.  I even remember showing my ID and business card at a checkpoint, the town was otherwise evacuated.

The Los Alamos fires brought firefighters in from all over the west, including Arizona.  While in Albuquerque waiting for my flight back home to Phoenix, firefighters still in some of their gear appeared among us waiting passengers.  People started applauding them and so did I.  I smugly smiled to myself knowing I was there, behind the fire-lines, helping our insureds, mostly US government workers, with cash assistance and access to their data via the emergency network I had set up.  No single act of my career has been as important to me as my contribution and last minute response to those fires.

I remain close to my former colleagues at that insurance company some 20 years later, they still strive on privately owned by a man and a friend, my age, Beau Brown, who inherited control of his company from his father.  He treated us like equals, not like serfs, he never acted like a company owner, and if he asked you a question about something, it was because he wanted to learn, not to test your knowledge.  For my 40 year career he remains the most modest man, and man whose principles I was most loyal to, in my entire life.  Forget working for big corporations, private enterprise is where I found my niche in my career.

Thanks for the post, raises many memories of my air commutes between Phoenix and Albuquerque, and Phoenix and San Francisco, when I had to visit my company's home office.

John

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Grande_Fire

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I was reading about how some vets don't like the 'hero worship' so much. I guess it can be a bit much over time when all you want is to have a coffee like everyone else and left in peace. Not many countries do it and here in New Zealand a cop, firefighter, soldier etc, it is a job just like anyone else, that phenomena isn't really our culture. We are all on the same bus going in the same direction, only some of us happen to be a cop, firefighter or soldier...etc, but not really any emphasis on anyone in day to day life with exception of ANZAC day or other military services. I think I would prefer it that way

Edited by Matthew Kane

Matthew Kane

 

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People feel that they should say something or show their appreciation in some way. 

I'll walk up to a Vet and thank him for his service sometimes.  

I was rejected for the Vietnam draft and tried to enlist in the Marine Corps, but was rejected from there too (my Mom was relieved).  I guess because of that, I appreciate those who did serve, especially in Vietnam.

A simple "You're welcome" or something similar is adequate.

When someone comes up to you and thanks you for your service, they are really thanking ALL of our military personnel for their service, not just the one being addressed.  

 

Bob

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Robert Yunque

PilotEdge Ratings =   CAT-11 (2016-09-13)  I-11 (2016-10-23)  V-3 (2016-08-01)

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As a Vietnam era veteran I never fail to greet and appreciate an identified or otherwise obvious veteran of any era. And most much appreciate, based on my era, the tone and expression of my greeting, apparently understanding......


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I don't know Matthew.  Few jobs put one in harms way for their fellow man or neighbors as do firemen, policemen, and military members.   It's not like being an accountant or salesman or bank teller.  Recognition of their service in a small way to recognize the dangers they face for us I think is appropriate, although it can get tiresome is overdone.

Noel

 

 

 


I'm first generation Norwegian American.  You know what they say about Norwegians.  You can always tell a Norwegian, but you can't tell him much.

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I hope it don't get tiresome.


Robert Yunque

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3 hours ago, birdguy said:

I don't know Matthew.  Few jobs put one in harms way for their fellow man or neighbors as do firemen, policemen, and military members.   It's not like being an accountant or salesman or bank teller.  Recognition of their service in a small way to recognize the dangers they face for us I think is appropriate, although it can get tiresome is overdone.

Noel

It is not that people don't appreciate what they do, it is that outside the USA it is not as much acknowledged in public but people still appreciate it all the same. I've lived in Canada, USA and New Zealand, you are more likely to enjoy your anonymity in Canada or New Zealand compared to the USA, and some people just prefer it that way. 

 

Edited by Matthew Kane

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18 hours ago, birdguy said:

Whenever anyone finds out I am retired military they always say, "Thank you for you service."  Sometimes it's a bit embarrassing and for we Vietnam vets about 45 years too late.

Noel, that is certainly true. I never was in Vietnam, but that was more luck of the draw than anything else. On my 18th birthday I volunteered for the U.S. Army rather than risk waiting the draft. At least by volunteering, I was able to choose my MOS (31E20 - Field Radio Repair). After AIT at Ft. Gordon, GA's Signal School I was sent to Korea.

When I returned to CONUS, I found out quickly that I was being tarred by the same brush as returning Vietnam soldiers. For the next few decades I kept my service behind my teeth. It has only been a few years since folks have begun saying "Thanks for your service" to me.

For the past few years I've taken to wearing a hat with U.S. Army Veteran embroidered on the front. Several times I've actually had a few who'll ask "Are you a veteran" despite the hat! :laugh:

What has given me the most hope though are the number of young boys and girls who've made it a point to thank me for my service. Perhaps the next generation will do better than in the past.

I too routinely thank police and fire personnel for their service, which to my mind is even more valuable than my own modest contribution.


Fr. Bill    

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Interests: Gauge Programming - 3d Modeling for Milviz

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1 hour ago, n4gix said:

I never was in Vietnam,

Two trips to SE Asia, first flying guns, second time around flying slicks.  Always in an AHC. 🙂 

 

Edited by Bluestar

I Earned My Spurs in Vietnam

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WestPac Cruise 1970 aboard Hancock with Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 129 flying EKA-3B Skywarriors.

 

vaq-129-6.jpg


Charlie Aron

Awaiting the new Microsoft Flight Sim and the purchase of a new system.  Running a Chromebook for now! :cool:

                                     

 

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48 minutes ago, charliearon said:

WestPac Cruise 1970 aboard Hancock with Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 129 flying EKA-3B Skywarriors.

That's very interesting Charlie.  My father and I served int he Navy at the same time (he did over 30 years and I did the minimum to retire).  He was a CIC (EW Officer) over there... USS Long Beach in the 60's and the Connie in the late 60's and early 70's.  He made EW runs over North Vietnam on some Dets (mostly because he wanted to), and trained a lot of Air Force and Navy EW types.

I was merely a fast boat submariner.

 

 


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Growing up in a military family,(Army) during the Viet Nam draft era I always took it for granted that's what a young man was expected to do. I enlisted in 1971 and was one of the last troops with drawn from Viet Nam after the in place cease fire was signed in 73 cutting my tour short. I was always grateful for my time in the Army. It provided me with experiences I would only be able to wonder about other wise. That's why I often feel humbled when some one thanks me for my service. I guess  I feel I'm  the one who should be grateful for the opportunity and experience it afforded me.  Of course I came back whole. My resect and gratitude is for those who did not.

Edited by PATCO LCH
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Vic green

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11 hours ago, Matthew Kane said:

It is not that people don't appreciate what they do, it is that outside the USA it is not as much acknowledged in public but people still appreciate it all the same. I've lived in Canada, USA and New Zealand, you are more likely to enjoy your anonymity in Canada or New Zealand compared to the USA, and some people just prefer it that way. 

 

Same in Ireland, although our forces are so badly paid here it's an insult to our armed forces here. It might be a British approach to be more humble and not shout over the rooftops, and just get on with the job. The same with the fire-services here in Ireland. There is a twitter account and it's mainly about fire prevention and saying well done on their retirement and so forth. 

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Jude Bradley
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19 hours ago, signmanbob said:

People feel that they should say something or show their appreciation in some way. 

I'll walk up to a Vet and thank him for his service sometimes.  

I was rejected for the Vietnam draft and tried to enlist in the Marine Corps, but was rejected from there too (my Mom was relieved).  I guess because of that, I appreciate those who did serve, especially in Vietnam.

A simple "You're welcome" or something similar is adequate.

When someone comes up to you and thanks you for your service, they are really thanking ALL of our military personnel for their service, not just the one being addressed.  

 

Bob

I could not serve, as many of my age wanted to during the Iran hostage crisis, due to some minor but uncorrectable problems with my vision, plus my weight and small stature out of high school (but I sprouted five inches in college and gained 25 pounds, lol).  The service vets gave us in all wars cannot be appreciated enough.  Vietnam protesters who mocked our servicemen did not understand that even if the war was morally wrong, their service is what allowed them the freedom to protest.  These servicemen served in their place, sacrificed their lives, and the same holds true to this day in the unpopular Middle East wars and service elsewhere.  Without their voluntary (and in the case of the draft, sometimes involuntary) service, we would have had to go in their place, the less qualified, or less fit, or those like me who sought an education.  I wanted to go into the ROTC, to be a jet pilot or at least work around aircraft like my Air Force buddy and B52 mechanic, a hydraulics specialist, did.  On a funny note, he almost fell from the top of a B52 once.  He said you could see his scratch marks in the paint as he grabbed on with all his might.  He served in peacetime but even in peace time, our service men sacrifice.  Service in any government capacity (I worked on a contract for the State of Arizona once) is something to be proud of.  Or service in any job you wish to do to your utmost, whether it be breadmaker, or hotelier like I once was, refuse collector, or politician.

John

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