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knukles

Manual solution of OOM

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FSX 32 bit application only sees 4GB of RAM. This program unlocks it, and simulator sees the full amount of RAM.
Your feedback is very important!

 

Called 4gb_putch, unfortunately I can't throw it here


Chvelev Сергей

  

3135.jpg5a2d30bfb275.png

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This isnt doing what you thing it is, it just marks the executable as largeaddressaware, which the executable already has set if you are running SP2


Chris Warner

 

PMDG : JS4100, MD-11, 737 NGX (Soon!)

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This program unlocks it, and simulator sees the full amount of RAM.
Your feedback is very important!

 

No, it will do what MrRoper already said above, and that means 32bit application on 64bit OS will use 4GB instead of only 2GB. You don't need it with FSX and Windows 7 64bit


Zeljko Budovic

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FSX 32 bit application only sees 4GB of RAM. This program unlocks it, and simulator sees the full amount of RAM.

Your feedback is very important!

 

Called 4gb_putch, unfortunately I can't throw it here

Thanks for trying to help but believe me there is no technical way of making a 32-bit process use or see more than 4GiB RAM memory.

 

As the others said, SP2 makes this large address aware so up to 4GiB max.


Wes Meyer

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As the others said, SP2 makes this large address aware so up to 4GiB max.

 

As someone who works in IT as my day job, it kinda pains me to ask this, because I feel like I should have gotten some industry-wide memo or something, but what prompted the recent change to GiB, versus GB?


Kyle Rodgers

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So, GB is actually slightly inaccurate.

 

Makes sense.  It's more of a mouthful to pronounce, and it's extra keys to type, so there's no way I'll use it, but it makes sense...haha.


Kyle Rodgers

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Makes sense.  It's more of a mouthful to pronounce, and it's extra keys to type, so there's no way I'll use it, but it makes sense...haha.

 

 

Kyle,

 

pls. note that, when pronouncing GiB, your OOM will occur almost 300 MB later!!!   :LMAO:


What happened to AVSIM

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Kyle,

 

pls. note that, when pronouncing GiB, your OOM will occur almost 300 MB later!!!   :LMAO:

 

haha - thanks for that. :wink:


Kyle Rodgers

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As someone who works in IT as my day job, it kinda pains me to ask this, because I feel like I should have gotten some industry-wide memo or something, but what prompted the recent change to GiB, versus GB?

 

Yip all correct, what olli and others said. Basically GB = 1000MB and GiB = 1024MB. So a damn 1TB Hard Drive is actually 931GiB, whereas if they advertised it as 1TiB it would actually show up correctly. (Theoretically, windows like to do funny business behind the scenes.

 

Just to make life interesting!


Wes Meyer

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Yes but back in the real world everyone in computing was always well aware that the multiplier was 1024 not 1000. 1 GB of memory would make no logical sense as 1,000,000,000 bytes. It's really only hard disk manufacturers who like to use the SI meaning of the giga prefix to inflate their disk sizes for marketing reasons.

 

So in computing a GB always was a GiB in all but name.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


ki9cAAb.jpg

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True Kevin, true... only marketing

 

The OP has made another fundamental error though, as the 4GiB/GB limit has nothing to do with RAM... Virtual address space, VAS, is the term of the minute, but we all know that... :)

 

A


Andrew Entwistle

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So a damn 1TB Hard Drive is actually 931GiB, whereas if they advertised it as 1TiB it would actually show up correctly.

But large drives are quoted as Tbytes so are correct

 

..but the manufacturers of computer storage devices usually use the term to mean 1 000 000 bytes.

 

http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html


Gerry Howard

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But large drives are quoted as Tbytes so are correct

I just looked on WD's site and they don't treat such large drives any different. They quote disk sizes in GB and TB. A Tbyte is a terabyte, surely.

 

They are strictly speaking correct but if you expect to get 1 TB (in the computing sense of 10244 bytes) you will feel cheated. You'll get around 1012 bytes, about 9% less. Windows keeps up the confusion by not following the same naming standard. For example my laptop HDD is 750 GB according to the manufacturer. Windows "My Computer" reports that as 698 GB (750,145,503,232 bytes). It's not surprising people feel cheated.

 

As a software engineer if I'm working on a computer I think of the units multiplier as being 1024, not 1000. I write and refer to a GB (gigabyte) but always mean a GiB (gibibyte). As an aero engineer I think in terms of the SI definitions. But there's never any confusion in practice.


ki9cAAb.jpg

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you will feel cheated.

I'm not cheated.


Gerry Howard

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