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737_800

A2A Cessna 172 vs. 182

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Hello,

 

I want to buy a small propeller aircraft but not sure which one. I've a lot of experience in jet aircraft like 737 but never have flown any small aircraft seriously, so I missed in my virtual flying career that what in pilot actually starts with, namely a small aircraft. I want to start by zero, though I've knowledge about stuff, however, zero really means going again through theoretical concepts and revise everything or go deeper into detail, as aerodynamics, meteorology, navigation and so on. For that reason I am seeking a god machine. It should be tremendously realistic and accompany my journey as a virtual PPL pilot. I want to start off by learning flying VFR flight (never have done this before seriously, online, because I am an IFR junkie ^^) and go further to fly IFR, without any GPS/FMS. An important point for me is, the aircraft should come with sufficient documentation and manuals.

 

What I know is A2A products are apparently very famous in our flightsim community, so I firstly went to their products. However, I've no idea which Cessna I should take. The C182 is newer, so it might have some new technology in the software used, but normally you would start with an C150/C152/C172. I am planning to fly IFR, so we can exclude the C15X. Or are there any other aircraft that is recommendable for my purpose?

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172, its the place many people started flying first in real life (including myself), then get into the 182 etc. 

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I actually did a similar thing a few years ago, and it was a lot of fun. I did my best to follow a real-world training curriculum, then even simulated a checkride using actual PTS and stuff... Crazy, I know, but I really enjoyed that... :P

 

At that time, however, the choice of quality light GA planes was limited, so I had to do with Carenado's C152. Then, Aerosoft's Katana 4X appeared, and it was a revolutionary product in many respects. I still keep it in my hangar and try to fly it regularly, but it has its limitations (more to do with the actual plane than the model itself, which I still find extraordinary). It's day VFR only, plus it's painfully slow.

 

If I was to do this now, my choice would be between the A2A Skyhawk and the A2A Cherokee. It's really a matter of preference, but the two are beautifully modeled in terms of both flying characteristics and systems (including avionics).The 172 has a slightly more up-to-date set of Bendix-King radios (faithfully reproduced to the tiniest detail).

 

Additionally, A2A offer very flexible avionics options, so you can start with a "bare-bones" VFR setup (two COM/NAVS) plus ADF, DME and autopilot. Then you can use a portable GPS (FSX default Garmin 295), and if you want to use the plane for more advanced flying, there's seamless integration with a full range of third-party GPS units (Reality XP GNS 430/530, Mindstar GNS 430/530 and Flight1 GTN 650/750), so you can upgrade to a fully capable IFR machine as you would do in real life.

 

Of course, the A2A Skylane has all the above, but it's a larger plane that probably wouldn't be your primary PPL trainer, although it will probably serve you longer as your own private aircraft.

 

If you really want to do this with full realism, my choice would be between those three, you just need to see which one is the best fit for your individual preferences.

 

I hope this helps... And enjoy your virtual PPL training, I know I did... I've recently been struggling to find the same kind of fun as I had back then, and the A2A Skyhawk is now helping me regain that.

 

Cheers,

Tym

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I have the A2A 172, 182, and Cherokee. My personal favorite of the 3 is the 182, love the way it handles and it feels more substantial, as a platform, than the 172. I pick the Cherokee 2nd, it has a retro appeal for me, adds some significant differences to the 182 or 172, and might be just what your looking for. As a bonus all 3 allow for full integration of the F1 GTN gauges if you so desire. The A2A J3 is a gem also, no coffee breaks flying that one and take an empty plastic bottle along. The best first plane I can think of to suggest to learn about stick and rudder flying.

 

I also suggest checking out the RealAir Duke Turbine V2 (also can integrate the GTN) and the Lancair Legacy, very different to any of the above and having their own special qualities, not the study level planes (within their level of complexity as aircraft) of the A2A's but wouldn't be without either. The T-Duke config will let you opt for no GPS if you like. We should be getting a V2 Duke B60 in the near(?) future if you want a piston twin instead of turbine, and I suspect it will offer the same GPS options when released. I hope to be surprised at some point down the road with a GTN patch for the Legacy as well.

 

These are my personal choices to fly most of the timetaking all into consideration yoiu've got a nice path to learn and enjoy from J3 to Turbine Twin. 

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A different approach might be to say neither.

 

For the very basics of flying, the A2A Piper Cub is extremely hard to beat.  It manages to give a visceral thrill to basic stick and rudder flying that very little else manages to capture, while still providing all of the little detail that Accu-sim can provide. It doesn't have a walk around, like the 172, the 182, or the Cherokee, but it does have a front seat passenger that responds to your flying.

 

If the Cub doesn't float your boat, I would suggest the 172 or the Cherokee. The 182 is a step-up from the 172.

 

Not an A2A aircraft, but another consideration would be the Diamond DA20-100 Katana from Aerosoft.  It's not an IFR capable airplane, but it was designed as a trainer. In my opinion, it's very much the equal of any of the A2A planes, and in certain areas, surpasses them.  It takes the idea of having to care for your aircraft to a higher level yet and provides an incredibly immersive simulation. 

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My favorites are the Cherokee and the 182.

 

The 172 is less nice to fly IMHO..

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It's genuinely a shame, that you've no quality GPS in it, at this price!

 

I personally tend to the Cessna 172, because if everything goes according to plan I will start my PPL in some years. I know it's still far away but however, when I start my real world flying lessons in all likelihood I am going to fly a C172.

 

It's really difficult to decide, the Piper is an great aircraft, too. I am not a noob, I've more than 600-700 flying hours (online flight, only) in the 737, do you think it's a huge difference to learn flying in a prop? Can you also recommend some (real) documents to get started?

 

I think Cessna 172 will be fine, there are so many out there, I probably can't do anything wrong.

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I'm with Bert...  not a fan of how the 172 flies from A2A...

 

I much prefer their 182.  But I actually like the Cherokee the best of all three.  I learned to fly in a P28A.

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Hmm, even I probably will trained on the C172? Do you think, it's also worth to buy P3D? There is no bundle for FSX and P3D, means, you have to pay more to get them both. As far as I concern this is not necessary, however I don't know if P3D is the future sim or not and an upgrade would be worth it. So I could use P3D for VFR... and use FSX for my general stuff. Always this decisions...

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Both are great, but if you want best realism, start with C172. It is slower, so you will have more time to navigate and focus on other things.

 

I want to start off by learning flying VFR flight (never have done this before seriously, online, because I am an IFR junkie ^^) and go further to fly IFR, without any GPS/FMS. 

 

If you want to learn about dead reckoning and navigation without GPS, you can take a look at a video tutorial here:

http://vfrflight.org/en/tutorials.html

 

(second from the top).

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Get the c182, it'll last you longer and you can use it for more things than just flight training. I find myself using the c182 and the Cherokee much more than the c172 these days. Don't get me wrong, the 172 is a great aircraft it's just been relegated to short circuits duty for me.

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