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frantzy

Hangar not "Hanger"

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I just think it's fun. Last time I went to the US I flew into Washington DC in July. As we left the terminal I commented to my American friends on the humidity (much higher than we have in the UK/Poland) - 'Don't worry' one of them said 'you'll soon acclimate to it'. I thought for a moment and then realised that she meant acclimatise :-) Or to be obligated to do something. Ah - you mean obliged to do something.I have quite a lot of family in the US. Many years ago my dad went to visit his aunt and uncle. My father is an early riser and wanted to tell his aunt that he'd come round to her house at 8am and wake her up. So he said "I'll come round at 8 and knock you up' which he used to mean 'wake up' - the US branch of the family burst out laughing and told him that from their understanding (Detroit, Michigan English) he was going to make his aunt pregnant.Strictly speaking the idiom works both ways in British English depending, like so many things, on context.


Gavin Barbara

 

Over 10 years here and AVSIM is still my favourite FS site :-)

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The enligsh lanagauge fllows by the eye seeing the first and lsat litter of the wrod see wat eye meen???


James (jaydor)

"Let me X-Plane where I fly in 2020"



 

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The enligsh lanagauge fllows by the eye seeing the first and lsat litter of the wrod see wat eye meen???
Exackally!

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The enligsh lanagauge fllows by the eye seeing the first and lsat litter of the wrod see wat eye meen???
I think it´s pritty the same in every other similar germanic language. For exapmle in german ist´s the same. Very astonishing what our brain can do! :smile:

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I geuss it relaly IS the smae in evrey modren lanugauge, Enlgish, Greman, Polsih or any ohter.

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I have read somewhere that the US English is more genuin to UK English as it was been spoken and spelled during the settlers times in the 1700's and on.The UK English evolved to a more high society kind of speaking, while the US English stuck on the original one.Apperently the the UK English was under high influence in the Victorian times to French influences while the US was not.True ? I dont know, but the article was believable.EDIT, we have the same with Dutch speaking, they do also in Belgium, and in South Africa. The South African is even more interresting, since its sounds more like a dialect I speak every day, and not sounding like normal Dutch.

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The one that always gets me is 'loose' for 'lose'. eg I loose power. Loose power would be a joy to behold.My favo(u)rite US UK differences in full vernacular colo(u)rTrunk vs BootHood vs BonnetGreatcoat vs Overcoat!I wonder wher that great US euphemism with definite sinister sulf (ph) urious overtones, " I want you to 'off' him.pH

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British people say "Zed" for "Z"... Silly Brits...
That's the way we read it all around Europe.Same for the Polish. Silly us... :wink:

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The one that kills me is the death and grave desecration of the proper use of the apostrophe 's'


Regards,

Mark

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The one that kills me is the death and grave desecration of the proper use of the apostrophe 's'
That´s a real pain! :smile:

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ColourColorflavourflavorcriticisecriticizeanalyseanalyzecalibrecaliberlitreliteranalogueanalogdifferent ways of saying 'nuclear'etc......'2 nations divided by a common language!'
Oh, there's a whole lotta more...Guttering - Gutters and DownspoutsCar Park - Parking LotBitumen - Asphalt (this one's sort of OK, considering the fact that Asphalt is technically "bituminous pavement"...)Naughty Bits - (well, we'll leave that one alone since there are a myriad of terms that could be used)Awl inn awl, eye thynk Bryts uze tue meny werds wen there ryting an speekeng. Wye uze werds tue harrd to prununce wen yer taulking tue sum one?Bi tha wey... mye spellyng ize impeckeble... pleeze donte mayke fune uf mee.

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Im shocked that nobody has mentioned Altimeter (pronounced: altimiter or alty meter) my instructor used to hate the way I pronounced it (altimiter).Also have you guys actually heard the London accent recently(although there are many) but grammar and the correct use of pronunciation certainly arent a part of it!


Anthony Milner

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In this large country, you can go to different regions and get varying versions of "American English". Some areas show more influence from Irish, Scots and Germans and others more British. For a linguist, this is a fascinating nation.

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