bean_sprout

Quickest Way to Clean Your Rig (internally)

Recommended Posts

Your rig should be near a door or open window.  I found an electric leaf blower does a good job.  Your targets are all of the case entrances which will most likely be fans.  A few blasts and any dust will be quickly blown out.

At some point you may want to do a tear-down and actually clean your fans but when I get there I'm ready for another build.

 

Cheers
bs

Share this post


Link to post
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

I do that too except with a shop vac that has a blower on it. The amount of dust is surprising. 😀

Share this post


Link to post
22 minutes ago, MrSpeaker said:

I do that too except with a shop vac that has a blower on it. The amount of dust is surprising. 😀

I do the same, reverse shop vac, works well

Share this post


Link to post

I just opened my computer case to install a new grahics card, but the amount of dust after 4 years was minimal. This is due to the fact that all openings into the case are protected by dust filters. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I've had one of these for years. Sometimes can be found at local stores for cheap: https://www.amazon.com/Metro-Vacuum-MDV-1BA-DataVac-Computer/dp/B00006IAOR

Sucks and more importantly, blows. And the small nozzles (which concentrate into a very powerful blast) allow you to get into unseen crevices to blow out accumulated dust bunnies. You can even wedge the tip right past the fans of a graphics card to blow out stuff you really don't want in there.

71gTkHiQcoL._SL1500_.jpg

 

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
55 minutes ago, HiFlyer said:

I've had one of these for years. Sometimes can be found at local stores for cheap: https://www.amazon.com/Metro-Vacuum-MDV-1BA-DataVac-Computer/dp/B00006IAOR

Sucks and more importantly, blows. And the small nozzles (which concentrate into a very powerful blast) allow you to get into unseen crevices to blow out accumulated dust bunnies. You can even wedge the tip right past the fans of a graphics card to blow out stuff you really don't want in there.

71gTkHiQcoL._SL1500_.jpg

 

Have had the same vac for six years-works great!

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, HiFlyer said:

I've had one of these for years. Sometimes can be found at local stores for cheap: https://www.amazon.com/Metro-Vacuum-MDV-1BA-DataVac-Computer/dp/B00006IAOR

Sucks and more importantly, blows. And the small nozzles (which concentrate into a very powerful blast) allow you to get into unseen crevices to blow out accumulated dust bunnies. You can even wedge the tip right past the fans of a graphics card to blow out stuff you really don't want in there.

I use a routine ole shop vacuum and a cheap micro tool attachment set.  Virtually no investment and great results.  One small brush, about an inch wide, has its soft bristles at a 45° angle and it is great for reaching tight spots.  The kit has a reducer that fits into a 1 1/4" hose and its reduced opening is less than 1/2 inch.  That accepts the micro tools.  And it vacuums the dust out. It does not blow dust into tight recesses.where it is not seen.

Link to inexpensive kit: https://www.amazon.com/Green-Label-Micro-Vacuum-Attachment/dp/B01HDYEBW8/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1541302703&sr=8-4&keywords=micro+vacuum+attachment+kit

Edited by fppilot

Share this post


Link to post

Remember to hold onto the fan blades as you blow... the bearings are not designed for that airflow!

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
8 hours ago, bean_sprout said:

Your rig should be near a door or open window.  I found an electric leaf blower does a good job.  Your targets are all of the case entrances which will most likely be fans.  A few blasts and any dust will be quickly blown out.

At some point you may want to do a tear-down and actually clean your fans but when I get there I'm ready for another build.

 

Cheers
bs

 

Tear down? Another build when the fans are dirty? 

Can i have your old hardware? You must be replacing parts every month then. 🙂

Not sure about the tear down part. I just slide the side off and blow it out. I live in a dusty area so I do it every 3 motths. Reverse vac like everyone else. 

Edited by Raging Bull

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, WingZ said:

Remember to hold onto the fan blades as you blow... the bearings are not designed for that airflow!

This is good advice. The cooling fans are not made to rotate at the speeds that a powerful blast of external air can induce - especially if the stream of air hits the fan blades off center, which can put an excessive side load on the bearings. 

Share this post


Link to post

I tape used clothes drier fabric softener sheets over intake vents, change them at least once a month, and that eliminates most of the dust that can enter my case.  About once a year I will open the case and use a vacuum to collect any dust that managed to get in and a can of compressed gas duster to blow the dust out of the areas in which the vacuum is not effective.

Share this post


Link to post

The basic premise is to pressurize your case so air flows in reverse.


Cheers 

Share this post


Link to post

Yep, and if you can force sufficient filtered air into the case, exhaust fans could be irrelevant and you would  have good air cooling.  My Antec 900 has two 120 mm intake fans on the front set to medium speed, a single 120 exhaust fan on the back and a 200 mm exhaust fan on the top, both set to low speeds.  I think my case air pressure is balanced, but I cannot swear that it is under positive pressure.  The last thing you want is negative pressure inside the case as that will suck dust in through every crack and crevice.

Share this post


Link to post

IT Dusters CompuCleaner Xpert.

Once a year in Spring, when it gets a little warmer outside. Not much dust to clean though.

Running custom built watercooling, very silent system.

Edited by SimonC

Share this post


Link to post

I use a compressor.  Just put a screwdriver or something in the fans to prevent damaging them.

Share this post


Link to post

PC's used at home don't get all that dusty compared to PC's in factories, particularly ones used near areas with welding and grinding etc. I've seen some really bad ones in factories over the years but they still work year after year, considering a factory is very hot in the summer time over 100 degrees and they get really full of dirt and grime, and probably never get cleaned out.

Usually the ones that end up on the factory floors are ones that were demoted from office use and have been around for about 10 years, so I would say if you never ever cleaned out your home computer it wouldn't kill it, probably just run a bit warmer then it should. People like to be dramatic but it is just dust.

Share this post


Link to post
29 minutes ago, Matthew Kane said:

I would say if you never ever cleaned out your home computer it wouldn't kill it, probably just run a bit warmer then it should. People like to be dramatic but it is just dust.

Hmmmmmmm.....

I would tend to disagree. Having worked on uncountable machines over the years, it's stunning how bad they can get inside. My girlfriend was quick after the first few times to order me out of the house when cleaning peoples machines due to what I called the "Nuclear mushroom cloud" that could billow from such computers when blown out.

It was actually comical watching huge clouds of dust billowing down the street. And a bit shocking.

Some machines were so caked with moisturized dust that it formed something you might see in a dryer lint trap that had never been changed. It stopped fans from spinning (including heatsink fans) and could certainly damage machines.

Smokers were the worst. You couldn't even keep the machines in living areas while working on them as they reeked of cigarette smoke from several feet away, and were often pitch black inside; so caked with particulate that the frozen fans had literally burned out and even melted a bit.....

Just seeing that a few times makes you wonder what the inside of the owners lungs might look like....... 😨

Don't even add animal fur/dander into the mix......

Share this post


Link to post

Speaking of smoking and cleaning inside your computer. Many moons ago when I worked at a service desk where we repaired client pcs there came in a Hewlett Packard that was not booting.

The gray case was yellowed, and reeked of cigarette smoke. Judging by yellowing on the outside of the case, it seemed likely that an ashtray was positioned directly in front of the case.

When we popped the case open we found that everything was caked in a layer of sticky tar. We put our gloves on attempted to remove parts to reseat everything on the motherboard.

As we inspected the motherboard we eventually found a capacitor that had blown open. From the looks of it, the tar had bridged the gap on the terminals and perhaps some condensation had finished the job. These boards in the 386 days weren't using surface mount components without exposed legs.

We called the client to break the news that his pc mainboard was toast and he decided to come pick it up without repair. When he came to the store we opened the case and did him what it looked like inside as we rendered the diagnosis. We explained, "Sir, your has computer died of cancer, perhaps you may want to quit smoking."

The man chuckled and then turned pale when he saw the inside of the case. He thanked us for work and then took his pc and left the store. I still wonder if we made a difference in his life.

-

I'm always amazed at how much dust comes out of my PCs when I clean them, and I clean them quarterly, more or less.

Share this post


Link to post
11 minutes ago, Oracle427 said:

From the looks of it, the tar had bridged the gap on the terminals and perhaps some condensation had finished the job.

Yes! I couldn't think of a word to explain the moistness and stickyness of the interior. It wasn't just dust anymore: It was like the sludge coating the wiring on the wiring inside of an old car engine..... 

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now