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Thomasso

If I manage to master high-end add-on planes, would I be able to fly them in real world?

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Hopefully the "trigger" they pull is not the A/P disconnect or moves the trim which disconnects the A/P which leads to another problem of getting it back in trim so the A/P can be reconnected.  :smile:

 

blaustern

Both the autopilot disconnect and the trimmers (where fitted) are operated with your thumb, I don't know of a 'trigger' operated by your thumb but I'm no expert in guns.

 

I agree it isn't the best description but in all types I've flown pulling your trigger finger with your hand on the stick/yoke will transmit to ATC. Trying to describe how to find and use any of the other transmit switches is much more hit and miss, type dependant (Airbus and Boeing use the switch in the opposite sense) and requires much more knowledge of a flight deck than we can assume in this situation.

 

I understand your concern but I still think it's the best sure fire way to find the transmit switch, curiously, my worry would be that they inadvertently move the control column (which will also disable the autopilot) but this whole scenario is so unlikely that we really don't need to worry too much about the details.

 

If you ever do find yourself in a flight deck and need to transmit, gently grasp the control column (with your hand furthest from the thrust levers) and pull your trigger finger, you will find the PTT switch there.

 

ATB

 

Ian

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I would still declare a Mayday. Because I have two incapacitated pilots. So in effect a medical emergency.

No point, once they figure out you're not a pilot and not a hijacker/terrorist you will be given a service from ATC that's far higher than they give to a mayday. Why waste the time pretending to be a pilot putting everyone's lives at risk if you can just tell them plainly and simply what's happening and let them work their magic.

 

Using 'pilot speak' will simply muddy the waters and confuse the issue, make it clear you are not a pilot and they will help you live out your dream. Make them think you may be some kind of pilot and they'll be very suspicious of this semi trained person who knows a bit about flying and has found his way into a flight deck with two incapacitated pilots (coincidence?). They will try to solve that dilemma before helping you, potentially leaving you to lose control of the aircraft.

 

If this were ever to happen and you save the day, the press will fete you as the worlds greatest hero and saviour but make no mistake, in this situation you are not a pilot, you are not in command and you are not the Captain.

 

I remember when I used to think about this scenario from your point of view, I imagined myself being super cool transmitting the mayday and as we come into land I whip out the stick and finish her off by hand! All the pax go wild and I descend the stairs wearing the Captains hat with 4 marriage proposals and 78 phone numbers in my pocket. I make my proud announcement to the press thanking ATC for all their help, with a nod to PMDG and the Avsim forums for all their sage advice and knowledge.

 

The reality is that the first few times I had to manually handle a real airliner, I was petrified. Despite the years of training and preparation, knocking out the autopilot and feeling the aircraft respond to my inputs for the first time was surreal, intense, exciting and terrifying. Initially you're taught to land 'by numbers' so I knew what to do and when to do it but as the radio altimeter called out ever decreasing numbers my stress levels went though the roof. Even with the gentle encouraging words of the base trainer next to me talking me through everything I still felt overwhelmingly responsible, my first landing was pretty good, my next few merely passable. After a few years on type you stop using the 'numbers' and start to get a feel for it and it's much less stressful. I changed type at the beginning of this year and I was back into 'landing by numbers' and I felt my stress levels rising again. It passes quicker but I'm still not as relaxed landing my new type as I was my old.

 

If you had to be in the seat for a landing, even an autoland (which I personally find more stressful than a manual landing) I think you'll find you are a nervous wreck, the enormous responsibility coupled with basic knowledge and negligible experience will push you over the edge. You'll need all the help you can get and, as useful as your systems knowledge and basic familiarisation of a flight deck (you know every airline has them slightly different, right?) from FS would be, being at the front of a real airliner on your own as it flies itself through the sky at your whim will leave you so overwhelmed, it will be all you can do to close the thrust levers on touchdown.

 

I've digressed and rambled, there's no need to do any piloting in this scenario, talk plainly to ATC and they will sort everything out for you. Anything else is just making everyone else's life harder. Saying "mayday" will not make them suddenly do something or help you any more than they will once they understand your problem. If you wanted to preface your "help me" call with a mayday (although painfully repetitive) that probably wouldn't hurt but, big picture, won't make any difference.

 

Sorry to blather on,

 

Ian

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once they figure out you're not a pilot and not a hijacker/terrorist

In such an unlikely situation, assisting them with this realisation would be my top priority.

 

"This aircraft is not hijacked. Please do not shoot us down. I will comply with any and all instructions..."

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Paul Synnott

 

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The CFI in the video reminds me of one I know. He once noted that all students teach themselves to fly, it's the CFIs job to keep them alive until and while they learn it.

I well remember trying trying to operate yoke the and rudder against his resistance in certain situations because I had not yet developed a feel for pressures needed...

Ian is correct, you are not a pilot in the scenario presented, period.

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Best Regards,

Ron Hamilton ASEL

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Sorry, been away again. Hmm. x3 call.

 

Ok, reality check time. 

 

Any passenger airliner from 737-300 up is usually certified with autoland. You can do an autoland with a CAT1 ILS. They have auto brake systems too. Anything Airbus or bigger than a 737 usually has a Rudder channel in the autflight system so will have roll out guidance and CAT3b capability now.

 

If the autopilot is in when you get your fantasy call up, great. If not just hit CMd A or B and ALt HLD and HDG or similar and strap in whne it levels out steady. You want to look at the top of the Primary EFIS screen and see along the Top line something like HDG, LNAV, VNAV PATH FMC SPEED, etc. If you do all is well.

 

Use the button on the coaming or the one on the com panel on the centre pedestal to speak to ATC. If you don't understand the reply ask them to say again. Always start with a MAYDAY x3 call.

 

With a rated pilot on the other end, it really is not difficult to get a reasonably knowledgeable simmer to dial up the ILS frequency, put hte aircraft on an intercept and descend to a platform altitude to intercept the ILS. Gear is gear, flaps are flaps. Speed is speed. Getting the right sequence of buttons to enable the autoland is straight forward and at the end, the aircraft should come to a stop on the centreline at idle.

 

Once stationary, just shut down the engines and wait. Even putting hte park brake on, the APU and stuff is not necessary. Instant hero.

 

FYI, a the larger the aircraft, the easier it is to hand fly. More inertia and stability. However, the energy management is the key, and hands on it's very easy to get out of the comfort zone. Commercial Pilots rarely do much hand flying, more the pity. I do a lot and my pulse on a windy gusty day into my home airport is rarely more than idling.

 

It's a damn sight harder to get a C172 down with a passenger and unconcious pilot than a 737NG. 

 

Enjoy.

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Mark Jason Harris.

Aged 50. 

FSX, P3D, X-Plane  & DCS. 

Scan 3XS Laptop 8700K 3.7ghz,32GB DDR4, GTX1080 and 4K 17.3 screen. Should allow more easy Oculus Demos out and about too! I've gone MOBILE!!!

B737NG Pilot. Ex Q400, BAe146, ATP and Flying Instructor in the dim and distant past! Now renewed my SEP to fly a friend's  C182RG 

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Well done.  I would think exactly that, Mark.

 

As a PMDG 777 flier, could I guide the real jet to the ground safely with autopilot and autoland?  Heck yeah.


Chris Honke...PMDG Cultist

[P3Dv4 flier, Radar Contact, PMDG 772, MD11, 744v3, NGX, QW 787, LDS 763 and Majestic q400-8 owner]

 

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I should add that on anything without the above aids, I'd try to get the have-a-go into a position that he was straight and level, then configure slowly and be gear and minimum landing flap set nice and early to get used to the basic flying feel then steer onto a long final and coach as required down the slope to a landing. 

 

No heroics just basic gradual skill increase during the event so you minimise surprises and other unneccesary crap.

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Mark Jason Harris.

Aged 50. 

FSX, P3D, X-Plane  & DCS. 

Scan 3XS Laptop 8700K 3.7ghz,32GB DDR4, GTX1080 and 4K 17.3 screen. Should allow more easy Oculus Demos out and about too! I've gone MOBILE!!!

B737NG Pilot. Ex Q400, BAe146, ATP and Flying Instructor in the dim and distant past! Now renewed my SEP to fly a friend's  C182RG 

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Anyone in real life that knows I'm into flight simming ALWAYS asks me this question. Here is my take on it:

 

In a scenario where both pilots were incapacitated and a stewardess was looking for a volunteer to bring the plane in to land, I reckon any hardcore simmer would have a great chance of getting it on the ground safely. There are of course certain things that will be different. Would you know how the apply reverse thrust? There's no F2 key in a real plane. Do you know how to lower the flaps? You don't just "click" the lever in a real plane. Do you know how to speak to ATC? Do you know where the PTT buttons is? Etc etc etc.

 

But yes, I reckon it could be done by many simmers, assuming you had a plane that was flying normally without any failures, and you had a very helpful pilot talking you through the approach.


Best regards,

 

Neal McCullough

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It's those what ifs that are lethal. So far all discussions have winds calm and mild to no weather, and there is no declared unusual attitude introduced. Visibility 10 plus.

Way too many favorable assumptions for my tastes. :nea:


Best Regards,

Ron Hamilton ASEL

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I wonder if these same people would be so quick to volunteer to go under the knife in surgery if they found out their doctor was not a real doctor but learned everything he knew on WebMD.

 

Come on, want to volunteer. I never cut into a real person my entire life, but I carve a pumpkin every year. Can't be that hard to take out your appendix.


Ken

Join Elite Air Taxi a free VA http://www.flyelite.net

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No one is denying that proficient flightsimmers understand the principles and basics of operating the autopilot system in an aircraft like the 737NG if they are proficient at doing it in flightsim.  But lets be honest, there are 737 flightsimmers who make their way through life on the cusp of slapdashery and vague understanding -  and there are those who truly understand what they are doing and why.  

 

Therein will lie the difference  - in addition the  underestimated reality of the situation which not everyone will be able to cope with equally well, regardless of how big a Top Gun they think themselves to be.

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And round and round we go.

 

If it was an automated surgery machine, and i played surgery simulator x and was competent with the controls. and the doc became incapacitated while operating, i'd press the 'stitch up patient' button, you betcha.

 

on another note, its amusing most of the guys saying that it could probably be done (under certain conditions) are the real life pilots..

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This discussion reminds me of the movie, "The Flight of the Phoenix."  A plane crashes in the desert and the passengers build a new plane out of the pieces.  Luckily, one of the passengers is an accomplished aircraft designer.  But then, after much work on the new plane has been completed, the passengers find out that he is a designer of model airplanes.

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its amusing most of the guys saying that it could probably be done are the real life pilots.

On balance, I think that is a much preferred situation

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