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So, the only component left on my computer that can be upgraded is my PSU, which is a Dynex brand rated at 520W. What I run under this PSU is in my signature.

 

I have heard feedback from the community that Dynex is not something I should be using, so I am thinking of replacing my current PSU with maybe a CX750 or a TX650 from Corsair. Which would be better, and what performance gain/stability would be brought with a brand-name PSU with increased wattage?

 

Also, I have heard of a phenomenon called coil whine which happens on either the PSU or GPU. Would this upgrade cause my GPU to produce coil whine?

 

Thanks in advance.

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For starters, you reduce your chances of a PSU failure smoking your PC...I've seen motherboards and other components destroyed as collateral damage due to catastrophic PSU failures. Personally, I'm a believer in some overkill in the PSU department--I'd get the 750 if it were me to have a little more headroom.

 

A quality PSU is more likely to give you stable, properly-regulated current, which contributes to overall system stability. There is no performance gain to be had from a PSU upgrade.

 

It's impossible to predict under what circumstances any system might produce coil whine.

 

Cheers

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For starters, you reduce your chances of a PSU failure smoking your PC...I've seen motherboards and other components destroyed as collateral damage due to catastrophic PSU failures. Personally, I'm a believer in some overkill in the PSU department--I'd get the 750 if it were me to have a little more headroom.

Yep, current draw and how your power supply handles it means a lot. The more current that is drawn by your MB, graphics cards, fans, HDD, SSD, and DVD, the harder the power supply has to work. If your current 520 watt power supply is having to keep up with 500 watts of constant draw and having peaks at times where it has to supply more current, the possibility of it overheating and failing, with subsequent spiking of voltage to the rest of your system, is greatly increased.

 

With your current system and the possibility that you may want to add things later on, a 750 watt power supply is not really overkill.

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I, too, am a believer in reasonable overkill when it comes to the PSU.  Running a PSU at or near maximum rated output increases heat production, component failure, and reduces its lifespan. 

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Adding to the good advice tendered above,  I recommend you consider only those PSU's displaying "Gold" in their specs.  True, they cost a little more, however being more efficient will probably save you more that over time as well as providing more day-to-day stability.

 

Many brands out there.  Few manufacturers.  Suggest you do your research. 

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Ive had corsair hx620 and ran solid for 4yrs. Its still going strong overseas ln a friends pc. Now ive had an ocz gold 850watt for over two yrs and ive had no problems ever. They say the town i live in has inconsistent power so it surges from time to time but ive seen no sign of rhis. Im running an overclocked 2500k, two ssds, four hdds, dvd rom, 6fans including cpu cooler, a gtx770, dedicated sound card. I recommend looking for a sale, a 750watt psu from legacy brand and gold or platinum rating ahould be plenty. What will you be runing off it?

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PSU is the heart of the PC, a healthy and stable PSU will reduce chance of circuit degradation due to voltage oscillations (specially on the VGA).

 

I recommend you a 600w to 700 PSU, brand is important, more expensive doesn't mean better. My recommended brands are:

 

-Antec

-Seasonic

-XFX (XXX and all the new series, all made by Seasonic).

-Corsair

-Be Quiet

-CoolerMaster (Silent Pro Gold).

-Enermax

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At least get a semimodular one. Makes cable management so much easier. And yes, get a 850 watt or higher, then you are prepared if one day P3D can use 2 GPU's

Anders

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How many of you have actually measured how much power you are using? A 4770K and a GTX 760 won't pull more than 180W from the wall using FSX. Unless you're running SLI and two top end video cards, 550W will be plenty.

 

Cheers

 

Luke

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Seasonic is pretty good, I am using one.....and if you are running a SLI setup, you would need between 600w to 800w, depending on the cards.  Get the ones with 80 PLUS GOLD certification. 

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How many of you have actually measured how much power you are using? A 4770K and a GTX 760 won't pull more than 180W from the wall using FSX. Unless you're running SLI and two top end video cards, 550W will be plenty.

 

Cheers

 

Luke

 

Measuring wattage "from the wall" is not nearly the same as the wattage pulled from the power supply. From the wall, you are looking at 120VAC. From the power supply, you are looking at regulated DC voltages. Two very different critters in many respects.

Of course, a person could simply take the specs of the components in the system that the power supply will be feeding and add up the wattage to make a decisions on what to get...

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There are "wattage calculators" on the internet that can be used to sort out the PSU requirements for a computer system.

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Measuring wattage "from the wall" is not nearly the same as the wattage pulled from the power supply. From the wall, you are looking at 120VAC. From the power supply, you are looking at regulated DC voltages. Two very different critters in many respects.

Of course, a person could simply take the specs of the components in the system that the power supply will be feeding and add up the wattage to make a decisions on what to get...

 

The rules of electricity and physics still apply. If you're pulling a set amount from the wall, once it goes through the power supply and is converted to DC, there's going to be some losses and wastage. It can only be in one direction - down!

 

If you can draw 200W from the wall but have 300W being drawn from the power supply, then you have a Nobel Prize in your future. Or a separate power cable to your power supply. :)

 

Adding up the specs isn't a bad idea - I did that with the TDP on my CPU and GPU and discovered that they didn't exceed 200W.

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

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How many of you have actually measured how much power you are using? A 4770K and a GTX 760 won't pull more than 180W from the wall using FSX. Unless you're running SLI and two top end video cards, 550W will be plenty.

 

Cheers

 

Luke

I have - kill a watt measured a mere 360w peak with my system, excluding led monitor , while testing CPU stress with GPU 3dmark

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Run 760gtx and 3570k off corsair cx600 been going two years no problems. With power efficiency improvements of 900 series could swap 760gtx to 970gtx without needing psu upgrade.

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The rules of electricity and physics still apply. If you're pulling a set amount from the wall, once it goes through the power supply and is converted to DC, there's going to be some losses and wastage. It can only be in one direction - down!

 

If you can draw 200W from the wall but have 300W being drawn from the power supply, then you have a Nobel Prize in your future. Or a separate power cable to your power supply. :)

 

Adding up the specs isn't a bad idea - I did that with the TDP on my CPU and GPU and discovered that they didn't exceed 200W.

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

Never said the laws of physics didn't apply and I didn't say that you would have more wattage drawn from the pwo3er supply than from the wall.

 

However, I did say that ac and dc are two different critters and they are. I also said that the best method of figuring out what size PSU is needed is to take a look at the specs for everything in the system and add up the wattage requirements.

 

As just a small illustration of things, I have a 35 amp, 12VDC, power supply for radio equipment. I regularly draw a good 30 amps out of it measured inline at the output of the power supply... it's running on a 120VDC circuit protected by a 15 amp circuit breaker. Of course, plugging those values into a wattage calculation means I am barely drawing 3 amps out of the wall to drive my 12VDC power supply at 30 amps (360 watts).

 

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As just a small illustration of things, I have a 35 amp, 12VDC, power supply for radio equipment. I regularly draw a good 30 amps out of it measured inline at the output of the power supply... it's running on a 120VDC circuit protected by a 15 amp circuit breaker. Of course, plugging those values into a wattage calculation means I am barely drawing 3 amps out of the wall to drive my 12VDC power supply at 30 amps (360 watts).

 

I think we're in agreement - the only caveat I would have is that one should look at the CPU+GPU TDP rather than the rated specs. GPU manufacturers radically overstate their PSU requirements because there are a ton of crappy power supplies out there.

 

Cheers!

 

Luke

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Luke, I agree. There are a lot of crappy PSUs on the market. However, I like taking equipment manufacturers at their word mostly. There have been times I felt I 'knew better' and found out I didn't... Now, I tend to go a bit the other way and 'over engineer' things.

In my radio example, I installed the same model radio in my vehicle. The manufacturer suggested a minimum of 10 gauge wire for supplying power... turns out the manufacturer was right! I tried smaller wire, 14 gauge, and had terrible operation... increasing the size of the supply wire, and reducing resistance, cleared everything up.

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